U.S. markets closed
  • S&P 500

    4,232.60
    +30.98 (+0.74%)
     
  • Dow 30

    34,777.76
    +229.23 (+0.66%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    13,752.24
    +119.39 (+0.88%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    2,271.63
    +30.21 (+1.35%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    64.82
    +0.11 (+0.17%)
     
  • Gold

    1,832.00
    +16.30 (+0.90%)
     
  • Silver

    27.57
    +0.10 (+0.38%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.2168
    +0.0100 (+0.83%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    1.5770
    +0.0160 (+1.02%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3990
    +0.0097 (+0.70%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    108.5820
    -0.5030 (-0.46%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    59,329.81
    +3,521.21 (+6.31%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,480.07
    +44.28 (+3.08%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,129.71
    +53.54 (+0.76%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    29,357.82
    +26.45 (+0.09%)
     

Steroid dexamethasone reduces deaths among patients with severe COVID-19 - trial shows

·1 min read

LONDON, June 16 (Reuters) - Giving low doses of the generic steroid drug dexamethasone to patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 reduced death rates by around a third among those with the most severe cases of infection, trial data showed on Tuesday.

The results, described as a "major breakthrough" by scientists leading the UK-led clinical trial known as RECOVERY, suggest the drug should immediately become standard care in patients treated in hospital with the pandemic disease, the researchers said.

"This is a result that shows that if patients who have COVID-19 and are on ventilators or are on oxygen are given dexamethasone, it will save lives, and it will do so at a remarkably low cost," said Martin Landray, an Oxford University professor who is co-leading the trial.

His co-lead investigator, Peter Horby, said dexamethasone - a generic steroid widely used in other diseases to reduce inflammation - is "the only drug that's so far shown to reduce mortality - and it reduces it significantly."

"It is a major breakthrough," he said.

There are currently no approved treatments or vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus which has killed more than 431,000 globally. (Reporting by Kate Kelland and Alistair Smout, editing by Timothy Heritage)