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Is it still worth studying at a US university as an international student?

Ananya Bhattacharya
A student walks through the Diag on the University of Michigan campus amid reports of college football cancellation, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S., August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Emily Elconin
A student walks through the Diag on the University of Michigan campus amid reports of college football cancellation, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S., August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Emily Elconin

The US has long benefitted from welcoming international students to its campuses. In exchange for receiving world-class education and often some work experience, students engage with American culture, contribute billions of dollars to the economy, and create strong connections with their US peers. When it works, the system can be a powerful form of soft…

 

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