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Stocks making the biggest moves premarket: Biogen, Boeing, Walmart, Apple, Clorox & more

Peter Schacknow

Check out the companies making headlines before the bell:

Biogen BIIB — Biogen shares are tumbling after the drugmaker and Japanese partner Eisai discontinued late-stage trials of an Alzheimer's treatment. That came after an independent data monitoring committee said the treatment was unlikely to meet its primary goal.

Conagra CAG — The food producer beat estimates by 2 cents a share, with adjusted quarterly profit of 51 cents per share. Revenue was slightly below Street forecasts, however, and the company lowered its full-year organic sale outlook.

Darden Restaurants DRI — The parent of Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, and other restaurant chains reported quarterly profit of $1.80 per share, 5 cents a share above estimates. Revenue and same-restaurant sales also beat forecasts, and Darden also increased its full-year outlook.

Lands' End LE — The apparel retailer reported adjusted quarterly profit of 50 cents per share, above the 41 cents a share consensus estimate. Revenue also beat Wall Street forecasts. Comparable-store sales rose 9.1 percent, compared to a Refinitiv consensus estimate of a 2.0 percent increase.

Boeing BA — Boeing remains under pressure in the aftermath of the most recent 737 MAX crash, with NBC News confirming that the FBI has joined the investigation into the certification process for the jet. Boeing's vice president for commercial plane marketing, Randy Tinseth, told a Bank of America/Merrill Lynch conference in London on Thursday that he expected the Federal Aviation Administration to certify updates to the jet's flight control software, on board displays, flight manual, and training.

Levi Strauss — Levi Strauss will begin trading Thursday after the jeans maker's initial public offering priced at $17 per share, above the expected range of $14 to $16. That gives the company a market value of $6.6 billion.

Micron Technology MU — Micron reported adjusted quarterly profit of $1.71 per share , 4 cents a share above estimates. The chipmaker's revenue also topped Street forecasts. Micron's revenue forecast for the current quarter was below estimates, however, and the company is also trimming its capital expenditures as well as idling some production lines amid what it calls a challenging market environment.

Walmart WMT — Chief Technology Officer Jeremy King is leaving the retail giant , after leading a revamp of Walmart's e-commerce platform. King had been with Walmart since 2011.

Williams-Sonoma WSM — Williams-Sonoma earned an adjusted $2.10 per share for its latest quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $1.96 a share. The housewares retailer's revenue also beat forecasts, although its same-store sales increase of 2.4 percent was slightly below analysts' projections. The company announced a 5 cents a share dividend hike to 48 cents per share, and increased its stock buyback program by $500 million.

Guess GES — Guess missed estimates by 5 cents a share with adjusted quarterly profit of 70 cents per share, though the apparel maker's revenue beat forecasts. Guess gave a weaker-than-expected forecast for the current quarter and full year.

Apple AAPL — The Wall Street Journal will be part of Apple's new subscription news service, but The New York Times and Washington Post will not. That's according to the Times , which said Apple has been asking publishers for about half the subscription revenue that the service generates.

Clorox CLX — Clorox is suing rival household products maker Reckitt Benckiser, saying the British company is falsely claiming in ads that its Lysol products are superior to those made by Clorox.

Tootsie Roll Industries TR — The candy maker was ordered by a judge to temporarily stop using its packaging for its new Charms Mini Pops. Spangler Candy Co. had sued Tootsie Roll, saying that the Mini Pops packaging too closely resembles the packaging for its Dum Dums lollipops.

Herman Miller MLHR — Herman Miller reported adjusted quarterly profit of 64 cents per share, beating the consensus estimate of 60 cents a share. The office furniture maker's revenue came in below forecasts. The company also gave a better-than-expected current-quarter and full-year earnings forecast.



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