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Super Bowl Ads Measured In Social Media Mentions

Laura Brodbeck

With arguably one of the biggest nights for advertising over, brands that paid billions to air a commercial during the Super Bowl are raking in the data to see whether their ads were successful.

While things like brand recognition and the desire to buy new products will take some time to account for, advertisers are able to see whether their commercials had an impact on consumers by measuring chatter about them on social media sites like Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR) and Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB).

Big Winners

Engagement Labs, which has developed a scoring system in order to rate how well a brand is interacting with the public, used metrics like engagement, impact and responsiveness to measure how well some of the Super Bowl's biggest spenders performed.

Related Link: Are Super Bowl Ads Worth The Money?

During the week of the Super Bowl, TurboTax and KIA MOTORS CORP KRW5000 (OTC: KIMTF) ads performed the best on Facebook, while Avocados From Mexico and Apartments.com saw the most hype on Twitter.

On game day, Allstate Corp (NYSE: ALL) was the most talked about on Twitter, as the company ran a promotion entering users into a draw for $250,000 if they tweeted.

Distractions

However, one of the biggest concerns for advertisers is whether their ads were impactful in the way they were intended. For example, last year, Nationwide Mutual Insurance was all over the media for its controversial ad about child safety, which featured a dead boy. In that case, Nationwide got a lot of attention, but not in a positive way.

The same was true for PepsiCo, Inc. (NYSE: PEP) this year, as the company's Mountain Dew commercial – which featured a creature that combined a puppy, baby and monkey – generated over 68,000 tweets during the game, but for the most part the public found the ad to be weird rather than funny.

Image Credit: Public Domain

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