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Symantec Ends Discount Program with NRA Amid School Shooter Backlash

Jonathan Vanian

is ending a partnership deal with the National Rifle Association amid backlash against it after the recent school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

The cybersecurity giant said Friday on Twitter that it "has stopped its discount program with the National Rifle Association."

Symantec , which sells security software like Norton AntiVirus, has offered discounts to NRA members for products its LifeLock identity theft software, according to the NRA’s website. The website lists several benefits that NRA members can receive from companies like and credit card processing firm Clearent.

Symantec didn't elaborate on why it chose to end its discount program, but earlier this week, the progressive advocacy organization ThinkProgress highlighted the security firm as one of several companies that offer discounts to NRA members.


Other companies to have ended similar discount programs since the Florida shooting include First National Bank of Omaha, which said it would stop offering an NRA Card because of "customer feedback."


Enterprise, which operates car rental services like Alamo and National Car Rentals, also said Thursday that it would end its discount program with the NRA.


Insurance group also told USA Today on Thursday that it would end auto and home insurance discounts to NRA members.

The recent school shooting in which Nikolas Cruz used an AR-15 assault rifle to kill 17 people at a Florida high school has caused a number of advocacy groups and politicians like Senators Jeff Flake (R-Az.) and Diane Feinstein (D-Calif.) to call for tougher gun control laws, including raising the minimum age for buying rifles to 21 from 18.

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The NRA has countered by saying that certain politicians, advocacy groups, and the media are "exploiting" the shooting, according to the BBC.


Fortune contacted the NRA for comment and will update this story if it responds.

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