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Tesla is willing to license Autopilot and has already had 'preliminary discussions' about it with other automakers

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Darrell Etherington
·2 min read
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Tesla is open to licensing its software, including its Autopilot highly-automated driving technology and the neural network training it has built to improve its autonomous driving technology. Tesla CEO Elon Musk revealed those considerations on the company's Q4 earnings call on Wednesday, adding that the company has in fact already "had some preliminary discussions about licensing Autopilot to other OEMs."

The company began rolling out its beta version of the so-called 'full self-driving' or FSD version of Autopilot late last year. The standard Autopilot features available in general release provide advanced driver assistance (ADAS) which provide essentially advanced cruise control capabilities designed primarily for use in highway commutes. Musk said on the call that he expects the company will seek to prove out its FSD capabilities before entering into any licensing agreements, if it does end up pursuing that path.

Musk noted that Tesla's "philosophy is definitely not to create walled gardens" overall, and pointed out that the company is planning to allow other automakers to use its Supercharger networks, as well as its autonomy software. He characterized Tesla as "more than happy to license" those autonomous technologies to "other car companies," in fact.

One key technical hurdle required to get to a point where Tesla's technology is able to demonstrate true reliability far surpassing that of a standard human driver is transition the neural networks operating in the cars and providing them with the analysis that powers their perception engines is to transition those to video. That's a full-stack transition across the system away from basing it around neural nets trained on single cameras and single frames.

To this end, the company has developed video-labelling software that has had "a huge effect on the efficiency of labeling," with the ultimate aim being enabling automatic labeling. Musk (who isn't known for modesty around his company's achievements, it should be said) noted that Tesla believes "it may be the best neural net training computer in the world by possibly an order of magnitude," adding that it's also "something we can offer potentially as a service."

Training huge quantities of video data will help Tesla push the reliability of its software from 100% that of a human driver, to 200% and eventually to "2,000% better than the average human," Musk said, while again suggesting that it won't be a technological achievement the company is interested into keeping to themselves.