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We Think Bioceres Crop Solutions (NYSEMKT:BIOX) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt

Simply Wall St

David Iben put it well when he said, 'Volatility is not a risk we care about. What we care about is avoiding the permanent loss of capital.' When we think about how risky a company is, we always like to look at its use of debt, since debt overload can lead to ruin. As with many other companies Bioceres Crop Solutions Corp. (NYSEMKT:BIOX) makes use of debt. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

Why Does Debt Bring Risk?

Debt assists a business until the business has trouble paying it off, either with new capital or with free cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. By replacing dilution, though, debt can be an extremely good tool for businesses that need capital to invest in growth at high rates of return. When we think about a company's use of debt, we first look at cash and debt together.

View our latest analysis for Bioceres Crop Solutions

How Much Debt Does Bioceres Crop Solutions Carry?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that as of March 2019 Bioceres Crop Solutions had US$112.1m of debt, an increase on US$91.0m, over one year. On the flip side, it has US$7.14m in cash leading to net debt of about US$105.0m.

AMEX:BIOX Historical Debt, July 31st 2019

A Look At Bioceres Crop Solutions's Liabilities

According to the last reported balance sheet, Bioceres Crop Solutions had liabilities of US$144.7m due within 12 months, and liabilities of US$37.6m due beyond 12 months. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$7.14m as well as receivables valued at US$73.1m due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$102.1m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

This deficit isn't so bad because Bioceres Crop Solutions is worth US$217.1m, and thus could probably raise enough capital to shore up its balance sheet, if the need arose. But we definitely want to keep our eyes open to indications that its debt is bringing too much risk.

We use two main ratios to inform us about debt levels relative to earnings. The first is net debt divided by earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA), while the second is how many times its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) covers its interest expense (or its interest cover, for short). Thus we consider debt relative to earnings both with and without depreciation and amortization expenses.

Bioceres Crop Solutions shareholders face the double whammy of a high net debt to EBITDA ratio (6.8), and fairly weak interest coverage, since EBIT is just 0.58 times the interest expense. This means we'd consider it to have a heavy debt load. Even worse, Bioceres Crop Solutions saw its EBIT tank 30% over the last 12 months. If earnings continue to follow that trajectory, paying off that debt load will be harder than convincing us to run a marathon in the rain. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But you can't view debt in total isolation; since Bioceres Crop Solutions will need earnings to service that debt. So if you're keen to discover more about its earnings, it might be worth checking out this graph of its long term earnings trend.

Finally, while the tax-man may adore accounting profits, lenders only accept cold hard cash. So the logical step is to look at the proportion of that EBIT that is matched by actual free cash flow. In the last three years, Bioceres Crop Solutions's free cash flow amounted to 43% of its EBIT, less than we'd expect. That weak cash conversion makes it more difficult to handle indebtedness.

Our View

On the face of it, Bioceres Crop Solutions's interest cover left us tentative about the stock, and its EBIT growth rate was no more enticing than the one empty restaurant on the busiest night of the year. But at least its conversion of EBIT to free cash flow is not so bad. We're quite clear that we consider Bioceres Crop Solutions to be really rather risky, as a result of its balance sheet health. So we're almost as wary of this stock as a hungry kitten is about falling into its owner's fish pond: once bitten, twice shy, as they say. Even though Bioceres Crop Solutions lost money on the bottom line, its positive EBIT suggests the business itself has potential. So you might want to check outhow earnings have been trending over the last few years.

When all is said and done, sometimes its easier to focus on companies that don't even need debt. Readers can access a list of growth stocks with zero net debt 100% free, right now.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.