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Today's Pickup: C.H. Robinson makes a $50,000 donation to St. Christopher Truckers Relief Fund

FreightWaves
·3 min read

Good day,

The St. Christopher Truckers Relief Fund (SCF) has announced a $50,000 donation from C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHRW). The donation is one of the largest SCF has ever received, the organization said, and comes at a time when resources are being stretched thin,

"Alongside all the healthcare workers, truck drivers on the road right now are true heroes, battling this virus on the frontlines," Dr. Donna Kennedy, SCF executive director, said. "Within the next two weeks we expect to see a significant increase in truckers contracting the coronavirus, many of whom do not have healthcare coverage or the financial means to support their families. This is going to be a major problem for everyone, including the drivers, the industry, the economy, and Americans across the country."

The St. Christopher Truckers Relief Fund provides resources and financial assistance to truck drivers and their families who are out of work due to illness or injury. SCF also provides health and wellness programs.

"The pivotal role that truck drivers play in keeping our economy moving has been made even clearer in recent weeks as we have faced the COVID-19 crisis. We are proud to play a role in the incredible work St. Christopher Fund is doing to support the driver community, as they continue to get us the supplies we all need during this difficult time," Angie Freeman, chief human resources and ESG officer, and president of the C.H. Robinson Foundation, said.

SCF noted that truck drivers are at increased risk due to the numerous touchpoints in their day, from human interaction at delivery and pickup points, to pens, public restrooms and visits to truck stops and travel centers.

Truckers needing assistance from SCF may apply by clicking here. To donate to SCF's mission to support truckers and their families in financial need, click here, or contact Shannon Currier at shannon@truckersfund.org.

Did you know?

Economist Thomas Fullerton predicts U.S. towns near the Mexican border, which rely heavily on trade between the nations, could see unemployment north of 20% by June.

Quotable:

"Our technical leadership knew it was capable and when we started seeing shortages we said. ‘Wow, maybe this is an opportunity for us to fill a void.'"

– Amy Davis, vice president of Cummins Filtration, on the company's ability to take material used in filtration products as feedstock for N95 respirator masks.

In other news:

Amazon postpones Prime Day

Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN) Prime Day has been postponed until at least August, according to reports. The day, or in the case of last year, days, traditionally boosts freight volumes in July. (Retail Dive)

Rush hour is no more

One positive to come out of the COVID-19 is that those who need to travel are doing so faster as fewer cars on the roads have resulted in increased highway speeds. (Bloomberg)

Car makers extend shutdowns

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. (NYSE: FCAU) and Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (NYSE: HMC) are extending their U.S. plant closures into May. Both companies had expected to restart production next week. (Wall Street Journal)

Shippers moving to rail, trucks in Europe

The volatile cost of airfreight is forcing some European shippers to move to trucking and rail services to move goods. (The Loadstar)

Canadian National cutting rail capacity

Canadian National Railway Company (NYSE: CNI) is eliminating some capacity due to declining volumes now and the potential for low volumes into 2021, it said. (Financial Post)

Final thoughts

The low price of diesel fuel may be coming to an end as oil markets have trended up in the past two days on news that Russia and Saudi Arabia are close to working out their differences and cutting oil supplies. Diesel dropped another 3-plus cents last week to just $2.58 nationally.

Hammer down, everyone!

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