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U.S. NRC denies license to Oklo Power's nuclear reactor project in Idaho

·1 min read

Jan 6 (Reuters) - The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Thursday denied a license to Oklo Power LLC to build and operate the company’s Aurora compact fast reactor in Idaho.

Oklo, a company focused on commercializing advanced nuclear fission power, was denied the license as it failed to provide information on several issues involving the Aurora design, the NRC said in a statement.

Oklo submitted the application on March 11, 2020, seeking an NRC license for an advanced reactor to be built at the Idaho National Laboratory site. The proposed Aurora design would use heat pipes to transport heat from the reactor core to a power conversion system.

NRC accepted the application for the project on June 5, 2020. After reviewing reports on various topics Oklo had submitted, the regulator concluded that they were missing important details.

"Oklo’s application continues to contain significant information gaps in its description of Aurora’s potential accidents as well as its classification of safety systems and components," said Andrea Veil, NRC Director of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

The company is free to submit a complete application in the future and will have 30 days to request a hearing regarding the NRC's decision after the publication of an upcoming Federal Register notice. (Reporting by Ashitha Shivaprasad in Bengaluru; Editing by Bill Berkrot)