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U.S. safety agency probes 1.7 million Hondas after braking complaints

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FILE PHOTO: American Honda Motor introduces the 2018 Honda Accord at the Garden Theater in Detroit
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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) -U.S. safety regulators said they are investigating 1,732,000 Honda Motor vehicles over reports of inadvertent braking that increases the risk of a collision.

The probe comes a week after the transport agency said it was opening a formal investigation into 416,000 Tesla vehicles over complaints of unexpected brake activation tied to its driver assistance system Autopilot.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said it has received 278 complaints that allege braking incidents "occurring with nothing obstructing the vehicle's path of travel", with six alleging a collision with minor injuries.

Honda said it will cooperate with the investigation, which the NHTSA said will affect the 2018-2019 model year Honda Accord and 2017-2019 model year Honda CR-V, and continue its own internal review.

A preliminary evaluation by the NHTSA is the first phase before the agency could issue a formal recall demand.

(Reporting by Hyunjoo Jin; Editing by Tomasz Janowski and Alexander Smith)