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VIEWING CHINA FROM AFAR: Magical Traditional Chinese Medicine (5) - Orthopedics

·3 min read

This short film shows how TCM orthopedics restore bone injuries with just their fingers

Featured Image for People's Daily Online West USA Inc

Featured Image for People's Daily Online West USA Inc
Featured Image for People's Daily Online West USA Inc

SAN FRANCISCO, June 17, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A series of video programs on traditional Chinese medicine produced by People's Daily Online show how traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is being practiced and promoted in China and the United States. The videos will also showcase how TCM has been used to improve the health of those living in different communities. In this short film, we will learn about how magical TCM orthopedics is.

An old Chinese proverb says that if a person injures one of their bones, they will need to spend 100 days to restore it. Different from Western medicine's treatment for bone dislocation, the hands of TCM practitioners may be able to restore bones and relieve tendons, and the body may feel lightened in just several minutes, according to the short film.

A patient suffering from a stiff knee went to the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology at the Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital in China's Guangdong Province. Chief Physician Dr. Lin Dingkun, who unaided any equipment or auxiliary medicine, treated him only using his finger to press, knead, rotate and shake the patient's ailing knee. The patient felt more relaxed and could gradually bend his knee again.

Lin believes that the source of pain originates from where the tendons and bones are connected. As a result, one suffers from bone dislocation and other ailments when one's tendon is out of balance.

The most distinctive practice of TCM orthopedics is manual treatment. It relies on only the hands, experience with manipulation, and the theories of TCM, such as human meridians, bones, joints, and reflex zones. According to the short film, the practitioner may be able to help patients with chronic orthopedic injuries to clear their meridians, adjust their Qi and blood, heal lesions, treat chronic muscle and bone diseases, and relieve pain.

More and more people have suffered from lumbar and cervical spondylosis in current society. In the short film, Ms. Yang is a typical patient. Lin concluded that there had some lumps and joints were misaligned, then he treated with a series of simple manipulations—such as pressing the acupressure points, smoothing out the meridians, and joint reduction manipulation, which restored the balance of the tendons and bones.

Dr. Zhao Guangwei treated a patient suffering from misaligned fourth and fifth thoracic vertebrae in California. First, Dr. Zhao loosened the patient's backbones by rotating, rubbing, and manipulating the back, then pushed with the patient's exhalation, "snapping" the bone back.

Dr. Liu Hao, a famous TCM practitioner in California, said that traditional Chinese medicine relies on just three fingers, a few needles, and a pen to cure disease. This method, used by practitioners for thousands of years, gets at the heart and essence of traditional Chinese medicine.

Amy Zhou
Phone: 919.564.8043
Email: usawest@people.cn

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This content was issued through the press release distribution service at Newswire.com.

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