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Whoever leaked the Josh Allen tweets may have made the move too early

Mike Florio

Assuming that the timing of the release of the Josh Allen tweets wasn’t simply one gigantic coincidence, someone specifically leaked the information in an effort to make Allen look bad so late in the process that he won’t have time to undo the damage. If that’s the case, whoever did it possibly may have made the move too early.

Think about the 2016 draft, during which a video of Laremy Tunsil smoking marijuana from a gas-mask bong happened just as the process was getting started, forcing teams at the top to scramble on the fly in an effort to decide whether to draft him or to not draft him. This time around, teams had from the moment their decision-makers woke up this morning until the teams are on the clock to come up with a plan for proceeding.

It allows the teams to conduct more research, to speak directly to Allen about the tweets, to spend time trying to figure out who leaked the information and why, and ultimately to decide whether to take him off the draft board or to lower his position on it.

Before those decisions are made, owners surely will be involved. While many (if not most . . . if not all) owners find a way to get involved without appearing to be involved, this gives them a much more clear opening to ask questions, drop hints, and/or issue mandates. As a practical matter, it provides the owner with cover for pushing the needle toward a player the owner wants, if the owner previously was inclined to not push for Josh Allen.

Regardless, there’s now much more time for these activities to occur. So if someone did this on purpose, they should have waited until much closer to the outset of the draft in order to create maximum chaos.