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Why Goldman Sachs, a Wall Street powerhouse, is going after the masses

Jordan Malter
Why Goldman Sachs, a Wall Street powerhouse, is going after the masses

The investment bank was founded by Marcus Goldman 150 years ago, and has been a major player in banking for over a century.

Marcus' son, Henry, revolutionized company valuations, leading to the IPO of Sears Roebuck in 1906.

The company was the gold standard in investment banking for decades helping bring Ford Motor F and Disney DIS public.

And partners including Henry Paulson and Jon Corzine got fantastically rich when the company went public in 1999.

But the firm's reputation took a beating during the financial crisis, eventually leading to one of the most interesting pivots in Wall Street history. Now, the company is going after the regular consumer with a new digital banking product, Marcus, and a partnership with Apple AAPL .

Watch the video above for an in-depth look at the history of Goldman Sachs and what's next for the storied firm.

— CNBC's Hugh Son contributed to this report and video.

See also:

  • How JP Morgan Chase became the largest bank in the U.S.

  • Why the Airbus-Boeing duopoly dominate 99% of the large plane market

  • The lost art of dividend investing



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