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‘Women are going to decide this election,’ says Time’s Up leader Tina Tchen

Kristin Myers
·3 min read

Margins in the presidential election remain narrow, especially in key states of Pennsylvania and Georgia where former Vice President Joe Biden maintains a lead, according to the Associated Press (AP).

Exit polls from the AP show that 52% of men voted for President Trump, compared to 44% of women — and some reports say that the gender gap could be widest in the 2020 election compared to years previous.

“I believe that women are going to decide this election,” said Tina Tchen, CEO of the advocacy group Time’s Up. “Both up and down the ballot.”

Tchen said there were many factors pushing women to vote differently from men this year, including enthusiasm over a Black, Asian woman as candidate for vice president.

“I also think what we have been watching for the last six months is how women have really borne the brunt of this pandemic,” Tchen added. “Women are 80% of frontline workers. Women are taking on 60% to 70% of the additional caregiving that’s happening at home.”

Tchen said that women were voting for an answer for these frontline issues that have disproportionately impacted women, and “making their voice heard” on those critical issues.

According to AP’s exit polling data, one of the biggest discrepancies lie among Black voters: 12% of Black men voted for Trump, compared to 6% of Black women. While some have posited the Black gender gap is due to “chauvinism’ while Black male voters have told Yahoo News that there are many economic reasons driving them to support Trump.

“Black women are living the economic issues,” Tchen explained. “And they have an understanding of how a change needs to happen on that.”

Tchen also pointed out that even before the pandemic, the economy wasn’t one that “worked for Black women. I think Black women understand that because, as I said, they are living it every day. They lived it before the pandemic, and it's exacerbated even now over these last six months.”

Black men, however, Tchen said, have different experiences than their female counterparts, around earnings and tax brackets.

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - NOVEMBER 05: A woman participates in a protest in support of counting all votes as the election in Pennsylvania is still remains too close to call on November 5, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With no winner yet declared in the election, attention is focused on the outcome of a few remaining swing states.  (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - NOVEMBER 05: A woman participates in a protest in support of counting all votes as the election in Pennsylvania is still remains too close to call on November 5, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With no winner yet declared in the election, attention is focused on the outcome of a few remaining swing states. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Though Trump did grab more of the Black vote in 2020 than he did in 2016, an overwhelming majority of Black voters did vote for Biden.

“We've seen the Black vote's been a cornerstone of democratic coalition, for generations, really,” Tchen explained. “And we are really seeing it in stark relief now in this election. It will propel the issues that are of concern to the Black community in the next several months.”

But the vote is only the first step to “making change,” Tchen explained.

Once the election is over, she said, “don’t let up.”

“Then get back to work to make sure that the issues that you care about get addressed, you know, as things happen, both in your statehouse, in your city council, as well as in Congress and in the White House,” she said.

Kristin Myers is a reporter at Yahoo Finance. Follow her on Twitter.

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