U.S. Markets closed
1 / 8

Arrival of a Tougher GED

Kaylin Wainwright, center, works with student Natnael Gebremariam, left, at a computer during a General Educational Development test preparation class at the Sonia Gutierrez Campus of the Carlos Rosario International Public Charter School in Washington. Seated right is student Sibusiso Kunene. Americans who passed part, but not all, of the GED test are rushing to finish it before a new version rolls out in January. About 1 million Americans who took the high school equivalency exam could be affected. GED scores will be wiped out when the new version arrives. Test takers will have to use a computer instead of pencil and paper. And the cost will be significantly higher, at $120. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Arrival of a Tougher GED


Americans who passed part, but not all, of the GED test are rushing to finish it before a new version rolls out in January. About 1 million Americans who took the high school equivalency exam could be affected. GED scores will be wiped out when the new version arrives. Test takers will have to use a computer instead of pencil and paper. And the cost will be significantly higher, at $120.