^GSPC - S&P 500

SNP - SNP Real Time Price. Currency in USD
2,888.68
+41.08 (+1.44%)
At close: 4:51PM EDT
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Previous Close2,847.60
Open2,864.74
Volume2,063,083,134
Day's Range2,864.74 - 2,893.63
52 Week Range2,346.58 - 3,027.98
Avg. Volume3,497,689,531
  • San Francisco doesn't care about the stock market
    Yahoo Finance

    San Francisco doesn't care about the stock market

    San Francisco is home to hot IPOs like Uber, Lyft, Slack and Pinterest. Big swings in the stock market get less attention than sizeable moves with any of the cities biggest publicly traded names.

  • Bonds, yields, and why it matters when the yield curve inverts: Yahoo U
    Yahoo Finance

    Bonds, yields, and why it matters when the yield curve inverts: Yahoo U

    The yield curve inversion had markets tumbling amid concerns of a coming recession, but what is a "yield curve" and how (and/or why) does it invert?

  • Predicting what happens next in stocks will get trickier this fall when markets navigate a roller coaster of big events
    MarketWatch

    Predicting what happens next in stocks will get trickier this fall when markets navigate a roller coaster of big events

    But rather than call it quits, investors may want to stay invested in stocks as the barrage of potentially market-moving events kick off, from China tariffs to Brexit to central bank meetings, which could yield more global interest rate cuts

  • Famed short-seller questions Trump as ‘the world’s greatest negotiator’
    MarketWatch

    Famed short-seller questions Trump as ‘the world’s greatest negotiator’

    President Donald Trump told reporters on Tuesday that he’s delaying some tariffs on Chinese imports to give consumers some holiday shopping relief. Short-seller Jim Chanos used his “Diogenes” Twitter account to question his wisdom.

  • Stock-market investors rattled by bond market’s ‘warning shot’ — here’s what’s next
    MarketWatch

    Stock-market investors rattled by bond market’s ‘warning shot’ — here’s what’s next

    The bond market sent a warning, and this time the stock market listened. Investors will be looking for clues in the week ahead that policy makers are listening, too.

  • Copy insiders and buy these stocks — because they see no recession looming
    MarketWatch

    Copy insiders and buy these stocks — because they see no recession looming

    With everyone from DoubleLine Capital’s Jeffrey Gundlach to inverted yield curve disciples now forecasting a recession, it must be time to join the crowd and sell stocks, right? Actually, this is exactly the wrong thing to do right now.

  • Briggs & Stratton stock falls to 44-year low after surprise loss, dividend cut and plant closure
    MarketWatch

    Briggs & Stratton stock falls to 44-year low after surprise loss, dividend cut and plant closure

    Shares of Briggs & Stratton were rocked Thursday to levels last seen in the 1970s, after the maker of gasoline engines and outdoor power equipment reported a surprise fiscal fourth-quarter loss, lowered its full-year outlook and slashed its quarterly dividend.

  • Goldman: Huawei deadline could further escalate a ‘full-blown economic conflict’ between U.S., China
    MarketWatch

    Goldman: Huawei deadline could further escalate a ‘full-blown economic conflict’ between U.S., China

    U.S.-China trade tensions could escalate next week following the expiration of an export ban against Chinese telecom giant Huawei

  • Consumer debt is not a ticking time bomb that will kill the economy
    MarketWatch

    Consumer debt is not a ticking time bomb that will kill the economy

    The U.S. economy has a ton of problems to worry about, but there’s one part that’s solid: consumers’ balance sheets.

  • Here’s what smart rich people really do with their nest egg
    MarketWatch

    Here’s what smart rich people really do with their nest egg

    Most people think they’re above average in intelligence, relationship status and professional achievement. Social scientists call this “illusory superiority.” My business partner Scott Puritz, has found the one area where even above-average people, objectively smart, rich, successful professionals, seem to wave the white flag and admit to not understanding — money and investing. “One of the most shocking things is the low-level financial literacy throughout our culture,” Puritz told the Washington Post.

  • Barrons.com

    Harvard University Sold Apple and Facebook Stock — and Bought Alphabet

    Harvard University’s endowment made some bold stock trades in the calendar second quarter. Harvard Management Co., or HMC, the entity that manages the endowment, oversaw $405 million in U.S.-traded equities as of June 30.

  • Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump
    MarketWatch

    Here’s the game plan for U.S. stock investors if China retaliates against Trump

    In the past, China has shown extraordinary restraint in response to U.S. tariffs and President Trump’s critical tweets. This is a critical time for investors. All investors ought to consider doing the same.

  • Barrons.com

    Big IPOs, Like Beyond Meat, Have Had a Good Year. WeWork Wants In.

    Most of 2019’s biggest initial public offerings have outperformed the S&P 500, relative to their offer prices. That’s likely one reason WeWork’s parent, We Co., has filed for an IPO.

  • Barrons.com

    Stocks Swing Wildly as Yield Curve Flips. Is There a Recession Out There?

    Normally, these signs would be enough to make investors plan for the end of the bull market, even if the market has a habit of rising between the first inversion and the start of a bear. But these aren’t normal times.

  • Barrons.com

    When Defensive Stocks Are No Longer the Best Defense

    Gains for defensive stocks have been so big that it might be time to do the unthinkable: Buy some cyclical stocks.

  • Barrons.com

    Wall Street Has Abandoned Oil and Gas Stocks. You Shouldn’t.

    The beaten-down energy sector is starting to look oversold. That’s misguided. Here are some picks to play a rebound.

  • When To Sell Growth Stocks: Why The Relative Strength Line Can Flash Weakening Health
    Investor's Business Daily

    When To Sell Growth Stocks: Why The Relative Strength Line Can Flash Weakening Health

    Price and volume trends can tell you if a stock is poised to head higher or lower. A stock's relative strength line, is also an invaluable tool to help you decide when to sell.

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Surged 307 Points Because Buying Bonds Is Played Out

    U.S. stocks surged Friday as Treasury bond yields finally stopped falling after a volatile week. Still, they couldn’t climb enough to end the week in the black.

  • What Happened in the Stock Market Today
    Motley Fool

    What Happened in the Stock Market Today

    On a day stocks bounced back, NVIDIA shares rose after the company reported a strong quarter, as did those of Deere despite challenges in the agricultural industry.

  • Dow ends up 300 points after volatile week but stocks still end down for week
    MarketWatch

    Dow ends up 300 points after volatile week but stocks still end down for week

    U.S. stocks were on the rise Friday, but Wall Street was still on track for weekly losses, as U.S. Treasury yields recovered from multi-year lows and investors continued to track U.S.-China trade negotiations.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Dollar firms, stocks soar on ECB rate cut expectations

    U.S. and European stocks surged on Friday on expectations the European Central Bank will cut interest rates but the dollar pared gains against the euro after a report said the German government was prepared to take on new debt to lift the economy. The dollar hit a two-week high against the euro as expectations of ECB stimulus weighed on the single currency and bullish data showing a jump in U.S. homebuilding permits to a seven-month high also helped lift the greenback. The euro rebounded to pare most losses after Der Spiegel magazine said the German government would be prepared to ditch its balanced budget rule and take on new debt to counter a possible recession.

  • Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall Street ends sharply higher on German stimulus optimism

    U.S. stocks rebounded on Friday as an ebbing bond rally and news of potential German economic stimulus brought buyers back to the equities market, closing the book on a tumultuous week. Germany's coalition government is willing to suspend its balanced budget rule and take on debt, according to Der Spiegel magazine, raising hopes that Europe's largest economy could steer itself away from recession and cooling worries over a global economic slowdown. David Carter, chief investment officer at Lenox Wealth Advisors in New York, agreed, but added that underlying anxieties remain.

  • MarketWatch

    Dow ends Friday over 300 points higher -- already marking one of the wildest month for stocks since December

    U.S. stock indexes on Friday finished sharply higher, wrapping up a volatile week for Wall Street, marked by concerns about weakening corporate earnings and uncertainty over the health of the U.S. and global economy. The Dow Jones Industrial Average [: DJIA] closed up 307 points, or 1.2%, to 25,886, the S&P 500 index ended 1.4% higher to 2,889, while the Nasdaq Composite Index closed 1.7% higher at 7,896 (on a preliminary basis). For the week, however, the Dow finished 1.5% lower, the S&P 500 ended down 1%, while the Nasdaq retreated 0.8%. The Dow marked its eighth move of at least 1% so far this month, the most 1% moves since December 2018 when it had 12, according to Dow Jones Market Data. Investors will be looking for guidance from central-bank policy makers next week when Federal Reserve officials are slated to meet at the Jackson Hole symposium on Thursday, a day after minutes from the Fed's July 31 policy gathering is released. This past week was marked by heightened anxieties about a domestic recession after the 10-year Treasury rate fell below that of the 2-year Treasury note briefly on Wednesday, a condition that has been an accurate predictor of economic recessions in the months after the so-called yield-curve inversion takes place.

  • Stocks Rise, Treasuries Fall on Stimulus Bets: Markets Wrap
    Bloomberg

    Stocks Rise, Treasuries Fall on Stimulus Bets: Markets Wrap

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.U.S. stocks rose for a second day as investors got a reprieve from trade posturing and speculation mounted that European officials will bolster stimulus if growth in the region continues to sputter. Treasuries nudged lower, lifting yields from multiyear lows.The S&P 500 jumped more than 1%, notching its 13th straight session with an intraday move of that magnitude as August volatility persisted. The index lost 1% in the five days for a third straight drop. Bulls got ammunition when on a report Germany would engage in deficit spending in the event of a recession. A day earlier, a European Central Bank official said monetary stimulus would be greater than investors anticipated. Germany’s Dax surged and the region’s bonds retreated.In the U.S., chipmakers paced Friday’s advance after Nvidia Corp.’s after quarterly sales and profit beat estimates. Banks also rose as the yield curve steepened, with two-year rates slipping and 10-years turning higher. Deere & Co. rebounded even after cutting guidance, blaming in part the trade war for undermining sales. In Asia, shares in Hong Kong rallied, Chinese stocks edged higher and Korean equities fell.The prospect for strong European stimulus bolstered confidence that the U.S. economy would be spared some of the ill-effects of the slowdown in that region. Investors remained on edge over trade after a week of back-and-forth headlines delivered wild swings in the equity and bond markets. With traders gunning for more rate cuts from the Federal Reserve, chair Jerome Powell may give a hint of his thinking when he speaks Aug. 23 at the annual central bankers retreat in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.“The Fed, in order to keep this expansion going, needs to provide additional accommodation,” Tiffany Wilding, U.S. economist at Pacific Investment Management Co., told Bloomberg TV. “Whether they are able to arrest the downturn -- there is some question around that. Ultimately we think that they will be able to.”Here are the main moves in markets:StocksThe S&P 500 Index gained 1.45% as of 4 p.m. New York time.The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 1.2%.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index rose 1.2%.The Shanghai Composite Index climbed 0.3%.The MSCI Emerging Market Index increased 0.7%, trimming the week’s loss to 1.1%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index rose 0.1%, pushing its weekly advance to 0.5%.The euro fell 0.1% to $1.1092.The British pound jumped 0.5% to $1.2146.The onshore yuan dipped 0.1% to 7.04 per dollar.The Japanese yen declined 0.2% to 106.34 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries rose two basis points to 1.5454%.The yield on two-year Treasuries fell one basis point to 1.48%.Germany’s 10-year yield rose three one basis points to -0.685%.Britain’s 10-year yield climbed six basis points to 0.466%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude rose 0.6% to $54.76 a barrel.Iron ore climbed 0.3% to $86.75 per metric ton.Gold futures decreased 0.6% to $1,522.60 an ounce.\--With assistance from Nancy Moran, Adam Haigh and Yakob Peterseil.To contact the reporters on this story: Jeremy Herron in New York at jherron8@bloomberg.net;Sarah Ponczek in New York at sponczek2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, ;Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Namitha JagadeeshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.