^GSPC - S&P 500

SNP - SNP Real Time Price. Currency in USD
3,135.96
-9.95 (-0.32%)
At close: 5:16PM EST
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Previous Close3,145.91
Open3,141.86
Volume1,596,216,273
Day's Range3,135.46 - 3,148.87
52 Week Range2,346.58 - 3,154.26
Avg. Volume3,547,575,714
  • Global ETFs accumulate a record $6T in assets under management
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Global ETFs accumulate a record $6T in assets under management

    Global ETFs have accumulated a record $6T in assets under management. Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith and ETF Trends CEO Tom Lydon discuss.

  • The perfect jobs report to end the 2010s: Morning Brief
    Yahoo Finance

    The perfect jobs report to end the 2010s: Morning Brief

    Top news and what to watch in the markets on Monday, December 9, 2019.

  • Stocks Drop With U.S. Futures; Treasuries Edge Up: Markets Wrap
    Bloomberg

    Stocks Drop With U.S. Futures; Treasuries Edge Up: Markets Wrap

    (Bloomberg) -- European stocks fell alongside U.S. equity-index futures in the countdown to major central bank meetings and a deadline for fresh American tariffs on Chinese goods. Treasuries edged higher and the dollar was steady.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index declined for a second day as all 19 sectors traded in the red. Contracts for the main U.S. gauges also dropped, with investors turning more cautious as they await news on whether Washington will go ahead with a planned Dec. 15 tariff hike on imports from China. European bonds also edged down.The picture was more mixed in Asia, where a regional benchmark declined overall in below average volumes but shares in South Korea and China bucked the broader retreat. Japan’s 10-year bond yield briefly touched zero for the first time since March.Investors appear to be pulling back before a slew of significant events in the next few days, from Federal Reserve and European Central Bank policy meetings to a general election in Britain. The biggest focus arguably remains on whether the U.S. and China can avert a new round of protectionist duties.“The idea that we have a relatively calmer period of time in the U.S.-China trade tensions is obviously very important,” Ben Powell, BlackRock Investment Institute’s chief Asia-Pacific strategist, said. However, “this is just a temporary period of relative calm,” he said. “The tensions between the U.S. and China are structural and persistent.”Elsewhere, the Mexican peso strengthened on growing optimism that approval is close for USMCA, the trilateral trade accord to replace Nafta. Oil slipped.Here are some key events to watch this week:The Federal Reserve decides on interest rates on Wednesday, followed by a press briefing from Chairman Jerome Powell.The next European Central Bank policy decision is on Thursday.The U.K. holds a general election Thursday.These are some of the main moves in markets:StocksThe Stoxx Europe 600 Index decreased 1% as of 9:08 a.m. London time.Futures on the S&P 500 Index dipped 0.4%.Germany’s DAX Index decreased 1.2%.South Korea’s Kospi index gained 0.4%.The MSCI Asia Pacific Index decreased 0.2%.CurrenciesThe Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed.The British pound rose 0.2% to $1.3169.The euro gained 0.1% to $1.1075.The Japanese yen was little changed at 108.58 per dollar.The Indian rupee strengthened 0.2% to 70.908 per dollar.BondsThe yield on 10-year Treasuries dipped one basis point to 1.81%.The yield on two-year Treasuries declined one basis point to 1.61%.Germany’s 10-year yield rose one basis point to -0.30%.Japan’s 10-year yield declined one basis point to -0.013%.CommoditiesWest Texas Intermediate crude slipped 0.4% to $58.76 a barrel.Gold rose 0.2% to $1,464.35 an ounce.LME nickel fell 1.9% to $13,080 per metric ton.\--With assistance from David Wilson.To contact the reporters on this story: Andreea Papuc in Sydney at apapuc1@bloomberg.net;Todd White in Madrid at twhite2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sam Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks dip as tariff deadline approaches

    Market uncertainty before the tariff deadline was reinforced by comments from U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Monday, who said President Donald Trump did not want to implement tariffs but did want to see "movement" from China. In the euro zone, Christine Lagarde holds her first meeting and news conference as ECB chief on Thursday.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Asian shares edge down as tariff deadline hems bets

    Asian equity markets eased slightly on Tuesday, tracking Wall Street declines as investors fretted over a Dec. 15 deadline for the next round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports to take effect. Pan-region Euro Stoxx 50 futures were down 0.03% and German DAX futures were 0.14% lower in early trade, while FTSE futures added 0.1%.

  • Wall Street’s Fear Gauge Is Acting Up. That Could Signal Trouble
    Bloomberg

    Wall Street’s Fear Gauge Is Acting Up. That Could Signal Trouble

    (Bloomberg) -- At this point, most investors probably just want the year to be over to book their gains -- especially now that the Cboe Volatility Index is behaving in a way that’s preceded stock losses in the past.The VIX, also known as Wall Street’s “fear gauge,” jumped 16% on Monday to 15.86, while the S&P 500 Index retreated just 0.3% and is still less than a percent away from its record high.Citigroup Global Markets Inc. strategists William O’Donnell and Edward Acton saw the action as “very interesting,” noting that the VIX experienced a “bullish hammer reversal pattern against major horizontal support.” In other words, a technical indicator shows the gauge is likely to keep rising.That happened just after the S&P 500 and VIX, which move in opposite directions about 80% of the time, rose in tandem for two straight weeks for the first time since early May. Back then, an almost 7% slump in the S&P 500 followed in the next month.There are several events this week that may be spurring investors to hedge: rate decisions by the Federal Reserve and European Central Bank, and the Dec. 15 date the Trump Administration is set to impose tariffs on another $160 billion of imports from China.Investors looking for levels on the VIX might want to focus on the 18 area, which represents half of the closing high from last December and is about 50% above this year’s low, according to strategist Todd Salamone of Schaeffer’s Investment Research. The 20 strike is another one to watch as that’s where heavy call-option open interest begins for the Dec. 18 expiration, he said in a note Monday.Salamone highlighted one more key level -- the 24-25 zone, which would be a test of the year-over-year breakeven, as the VIX ended 2018 at 25.42.To contact the reporter on this story: Joanna Ossinger in Singapore at jossinger@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Anstey at canstey@bloomberg.net, Cecile Vannucci, Lianting TuFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Stock Market, Apple On China Trade War Watch; Boeing, MongoDB, Stitch Fix Move On News
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Stock Market, Apple On China Trade War Watch; Boeing, MongoDB, Stitch Fix Move On News

    Dow Jones futures: The stock market rally and Apple stock await China trade war clarity from President Trump on Dec. 15 tariffs. MongoDB, Stitch Fix, Boeing were movers overnight.

  • Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Asian shares ease slightly as tariff deadline looms

    Asian equity markets ticked down on Tuesday, tracking Wall Street losses as investors fretted over a Dec. 15 deadline for the next round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports to take effect. Adding to the market uncertainty were comments from U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Monday that while President Donald Trump did not want to implement tariffs, he did want to see "movement" from China.

  • TheStreet.com

    Dow Futures Slide, Global Stocks Stall as Amid U.S.-China Trade Talk Standstill

    Wall Street futures weaken as investors continue to keep risk appetite in check ahead of today's Fed meeting in Washington and a lack of movement in U.S.-China trade talks.

  • Global Markets: Stocks dip as tariff deadline approaches
    Reuters

    Global Markets: Stocks dip as tariff deadline approaches

    Global stock markets fell for a second day on Tuesday, as caution over a Dec. 15 deadline for the next round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports weakened risk appetite and limited outsized market moves. Market uncertainty before the tariff deadline was reinforced by comments from U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Monday, who said President Donald Trump did not want to implement tariffs but did want to see "movement" from China. In the euro zone, Christine Lagarde holds her first meeting and news conference as ECB chief on Thursday.

  • Stocks dip as tariff deadline approaches
    Reuters

    Stocks dip as tariff deadline approaches

    Global stock markets fell for a second day on Tuesday, as caution over a Dec. 15 deadline for the next round of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports weakened risk appetite and limited outsized market moves. Market uncertainty before the tariff deadline was reinforced by comments from U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Monday, who said President Donald Trump did not want to implement tariffs but did want to see "movement" from China. In the euro zone, Christine Lagarde holds her first meeting and news conference as ECB chief on Thursday.

  • What to expect on Sunday as the U.S. slaps new tariffs on China
    MarketWatch

    What to expect on Sunday as the U.S. slaps new tariffs on China

    Markets are trembling ahead of yet another salvo — and likely countersalvo — in the conflict between the world’s two largest economies approaches. This one, writes Tanner Brown, is both substantive and symbolic.

  • Paul Volcker was the last Fed chairman who said no pain, no gain
    MarketWatch

    Paul Volcker was the last Fed chairman who said no pain, no gain

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul A. Volcker, who died over the weekend at 92, was a towering figure both in stature (he was 6 foot, 7 inches tall) and in his role in American life: He broke the back of inflation for at least a generation, maybe two. A cottage industry of “Fed watchers” had to glean what the central bank was doing from what happened in money markets or, as I’ve liked to joke, by watching which way the ashes fell from Volcker’s signature cigars. When President Jimmy Carter appointed him in August 1979, the consumer-price index was rising at nearly a 12% annual clip.

  • Barrons.com

    Here’s How Much Stock You Should Own When You Retire

    This article originally appeared on MarketWatch, a sister publication of Barron’s. We publish articles from other Dow Jones sites when we think our readers will enjoy them. You’ve put money aside for retirement year after year, sometimes the max, sometimes less when you had expenses to pay. You’ve invested it well, so now you have a good enough nest egg to carry you through the next phase of your life—retirement.

  • Why raising taxes on the rich isn’t so crazy
    MarketWatch

    Why raising taxes on the rich isn’t so crazy

    Democrats are not satisfied with the economy. Yes, unemployment is way down and the stock market (DJIA)(SPX) is way up, but average hard-working Americans are still having a hard time getting ahead. Imposing higher taxes on the rich would actually help the economy grow faster, Democrats say.

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Fell 105 Points Because Trump’s China Tariffs Can Kick In Next Week

    The main U.S. stock indexes closed with small losses. The trade talk progress is in focus as a new round of tariffs on Chinese imports is set to take effect on Dec. 15.

  • U.S. stock market snaps 3-day win streak as China tariff deadline comes in focus
    MarketWatch

    U.S. stock market snaps 3-day win streak as China tariff deadline comes in focus

    Dow book a triple-digit loss Monday, and all three major U.S. stock indexes end lower, as investors wait on global central bank policy updates this week and a key tariff deadline on Sunday.

  • GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks, gold little changed as trade war spurs concerns
    Reuters

    GLOBAL MARKETS-Stocks, gold little changed as trade war spurs concerns

    Global equity markets traded flat on Monday on hopes officials would delay more U.S. tariffs set to take effect on Chinese goods this coming Sunday, while gold held firm as investors hedged against a possible escalation in the trade war. Crude oil prices fell and the dollar slipped against the safe-haven Swiss franc after data showed Chinese exports in November shrank for the fourth straight month, reviving concerns about damage to global demand caused by the 17-month trade spat. The Dec. 15 deadline that will usher in $156 billion in U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods stirred caution, leading MSCI's all-country world index to trade flat while shares on Wall Street slid and European equities closed lower.

  • MarketWatch

    Stitch Fix shares rise 6% on revenue jump, names president

    Stitch Fix Inc. shares rose 6% in after-hours trading Monday after the online personal-styling service reported first-quarter results that exceeded analysts' estimates. Stitch Fix reported a loss of $178,000, or 0 cents a share, compared with net income of $10.7 million, or 10 cents, in the year-ago period. Revenue grew 21% to $444.8 million from $366.2 million a year ago. Analysts surveyed by FactSet had expected a loss of 6 cents a share on revenue of $441.1 million. Stitch Fix shares are up 46.4% this year. The S&P 500 index has gained 25.1% this year. Separately, Stitch Fix said Elizabeth Spaulding, global head and founder of Bain & Company's digital practice, will join as president. She will report to Chief Executive Katrina Lake, effective Jan. 27.

  • US STOCKS-Wall St falls as Apple, health shares drag, tariff deadline looms
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall St falls as Apple, health shares drag, tariff deadline looms

    U.S. stocks pulled back on Monday from near-record levels, as Apple and healthcare shares fell and investors braced for a busy week of political and economic news, including a potential turning point in the U.S.-China trade dispute. Investor hopes of at least an initial U.S.-China agreement have helped push major stock indexes to record highs, with the benchmark S&P 500 hovering about 0.5% below its all-time high. "The market is ... in a little bit of a wait-and-see mode," said Chuck Carlson, chief executive officer at Horizon Investment Services in Hammond, Indiana.

  • MarketWatch

    Dow sinks 105 points as health-care selling and worries about China's economy weigh on market

    U.S. stocks ended solidly lower Monday as buying appetite abated, following economic reports that pointed to weakness in China's economy, highlighting worries about a global economic recession. Health-care shares, meanwhile, also weighed on the broader market, with that category declining 0.7%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average declined by 105 points, or 0.4%, at 27,910, the S&P 500 index slipped 0.3% to 3,135, while the Nasdaq Composite Index retreated 0.4% to 8,622. All closing levels are on a preliminary basis. On Friday, stocks soared after a better-than-expected jobs report sparked a rally. Equity benchmarks on Monday, however, finished near their lows of the session ahead of the Dec. 15 deadline for 15% import duties on $156 billion of annual consumer imports to take effect. Data out of Beijing showed that China's exports unexpectedly dropped 1.1% in November from a year earlier, while shipments to the U.S. fell 23%, reflecting the weight of the U.S.-China trade clash. Investors will watch for the start of the Federal Reserve's two-day policy meeting, which kicks off Tuesday, with no expectation that the central bank will make changes to interest rates but hope that that officials may offer guidance on future policy. In corporate news, Shares of Chevron Corp. fell 0.6% after Citi analyst Alastair Syme downgraded the stock to neutral from buy.

  • U.S. Stocks Decline, Bonds Mixed on Trade Jitters: Markets Wrap
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Stocks Decline, Bonds Mixed on Trade Jitters: Markets Wrap

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. stocks fell in thin trading as investors turned cautious ahead of a week full of potential catalysts, from central bank meetings to a looming tariff deadline. Treasury 10-year notes held modest gains.The S&P 500 ended at session lows in volumes below the 30-day average. Weak China export data added to concern, with investors awaiting news on whether Washington will go ahead with a planned Dec. 15 tariff hike. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index retreated. Stock indexes posted modest increases in Tokyo and Seoul, though gains mostly fizzled in Hong Kong and Shanghai.The pound edged higher as polls continued to show the U.K. Conservative Party on course to win a majority in Thursday’s election, which would likely mean Britain leaving the European Union by Jan. 31. Gold and the yen were also slightly higher.With time running out for the U.S. and China to reach a deal that would ward off an escalation in tariffs, markets will be watching closely for any signs of progress. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said Friday the two sides are haggling over the amount of American farm products Beijing is willing to purchase. Data showed China’s exports fell 1.1% in November, with those to the U.S. tumbling 23%, underscoring why the Asian nation may want to resolve the dispute.“There’s no upside risks on the horizon,” Katrina Ell, an economist at Moody’s Analytics, said on Bloomberg TV. “It is weighted to the downside and that big downside risk is coming from the trade war.”Also in focus for investors this week will be central banks, with policy meetings at the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank that may offer clues on whether more monetary easing is in store in 2020.Elsewhere, oil slipped, trimming last week’s rally spurred by Saudi Arabia promising significant additional production cuts beyond what was agreed with fellow OPEC+ members.Here are some key events to watch this week:The Federal Reserve decides on interest rates on Wednesday, followed by a press briefing from Chairman Jerome Powell.China reports on inflation Tuesday, and data on credit growth is due at some point in the coming weekThe next European Central Bank policy decision is on Thursday.The U.K. holds a general election Thursday.These are some of the main moves in markets:What’s your 2020 vision? Terminal users are invited to join the Markets Live blog’s survey.\--With assistance from Vildana Hajric.To contact the reporter on this story: Sam Potter in London at spotter33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Yakob PeterseilFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • These companies have low labor costs that can turn into a stock payday for you
    MarketWatch

    These companies have low labor costs that can turn into a stock payday for you

    DEEP DIVE One of the best aspects of the slow but sustained growth of the U.S. economy has been that hourly wages have been growing faster than the overall economy. This is wonderful for consumers. But with slow growth overall, the tight labor market can put a damper on corporate profits and hurt investors’ returns.