^TNX - Treasury Yield 10 Years

NYBOT - NYBOT Real Time Price. Currency in USD
1.7900
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 2:59PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close1.7900
Open0.0000
Volume0
Day's Range1.7900 - 1.7900
52 Week Range1.4290 - 2.9190
Avg. Volume0
  • Stock market news: December 11, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: December 11, 2019

    U.S. stocks were higher and Treasury yields declined Wednesday following Federal Reserve’s final monetary policy decision of the year. In this, central bank officials decided to keep key interest rates at current levels and telegraphed rates would remain on hold through next year.

  • Stock Market 2020: JPMorgan sees the S&P climbing to 3,400
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock Market 2020: JPMorgan sees the S&P climbing to 3,400

    With the end of the year and the decade fast-approaching, Wall Street strategists have begun to deliver their expectations about where the stock market will close out 2020.

  • Powell says changes to Fed’s inflation-fighting framework will be meaningful
    MarketWatch

    Powell says changes to Fed’s inflation-fighting framework will be meaningful

    Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday that changes to the Fed’s inflation framework, to be announced next year, will be meaningful.

  • MarketWatch

    Treasury yields drop as Fed and Powell suggests rates will remain low

    U.S. Treasury yields retreated on Wednesday after the Federal Reserve’s policy statement and interest-rate projections indicated the central bank would keep rates at current levels next year.

  • Fed signals no change in interest rates in 2020 in more upbeat view of the economy
    MarketWatch

    Fed signals no change in interest rates in 2020 in more upbeat view of the economy

    The Federal Reserve Wednesday signaled it is more upbeat about the economy and policy is on hold for now.

  • Benzinga

    Fed Stands Pat: Leaves Rates Unchanged And Hints It Might Stay That Way Awhile

    After three rate cuts in a row, the Fed decided to leave things alone Wednesday and take a little time to see how things play out heading into the new year. The Fed’s decision to keep its benchmark Fed funds rate at a steady 1.5% to 1.75% likely didn’t come as a big surprise to anyone following the market lately. “The Committee judges that the current stance of monetary policy is appropriate to support sustained expansion of economic activity, strong labor market conditions, and inflation near the Committee’s symmetric 2 percent objective,” the statement said.

  • MarketWatch

    Fed's Powell says central bank could buy shorter-term coupon debt

    Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said on Wednesday that the central bank could potentially expand its Treasury bill purchasing program, if necessary, to include shorter-term coupon-bearing securities, while speaking in a news conference after the Fed said it would hold rates steady at 1.5% to 1.75%. Powell said that, for now, the Treasury's current pace of bill purchases of $60 billion per month was sufficient. The buying began in October and will continue through at least the second quarter of next year. The moves are intended to inject reserves back into the financial system, which may have held back banks from lending their funds freely to cash-starved market participants. As the central bank raises the level of reserves next year, the volume of the Fed's repo operations should shrink, said Powell. He also added the central bank could tweak the current repo operations to prevent a recurrence of stresses in short-term funding markets.

  • There’s a huge change coming from the Fed (just not today)
    MarketWatch

    There’s a huge change coming from the Fed (just not today)

    The really big news coming from the Fed is likely to be delivered in January, and it will have an impact longer than just a day.

  • Consumer inflation rises again as 12-month rate hits one-year high, CPI shows
    MarketWatch

    Consumer inflation rises again as 12-month rate hits one-year high, CPI shows

    U.S. households paid more for energy, health care and rent in November, pushing the rate of consumer inflation up to the highest level in a year. The consumer price index rose 0.3% last month.

  • For the stock market, impeachment is just a sideshow
    MarketWatch

    For the stock market, impeachment is just a sideshow

    Do stock and bond markets care about impeachment? The stock market is preoccupied, at least as portrayed by the media, with the status of trade negotiations between the U.S. and China over a phase-one deal that would provide some tax relief to China in exchange for its commitment to increase purchases of U.S. agricultural products. “Obsessed” is more like it, with every intimation that an agreement is nearing conclusion or facing hurdles sending stock prices (SPX)(DJIA) soaring or tumbling.

  • ‘Gundlach ratio’ suggests bond yields may rise
    MarketWatch

    ‘Gundlach ratio’ suggests bond yields may rise

    Anyone who has followed Jeffrey Gundlach, the chief executive of DoubleLine and the so-called bond king, knows he likes one market-based predictor for bonds.

  • Financial Times

    Fed holds rates steady with no change through 2020

    The Federal Reserve left its policy rate unchanged at 1.5-1.75 per cent and indicated without dissent that it had no plans to make any more changes in 2020. After a two-day meeting in Washington on Wednesday, policymaker predictions for the likely future path of the Fed’s policy rate showed a decisive shift toward a more accommodative path over the next three years. In September, when the Fed last published its predictions, the median policy rate proposed for 2022 by participants in the Fed’s Open Market Committee was 2.4 per cent. That has dropped to 2.1 per cent.

  • MarketWatch

    2-year Treasury yield rises to four-week high on China tariff delay reports

    U.S. Treasury yields bounce off their lows to end higher on Tuesday on expectations for a delay to tariffs on China, even as White House officials offering conflicting comments on the eventual outcome.

  • U.S. productivity falls revised 0.2% in third quarter — first decline since 2015
    MarketWatch

    U.S. productivity falls revised 0.2% in third quarter — first decline since 2015

    The decline in U.S. productivity was a bit less in the third quarter than previously reported, but it still marked the first negative reading since 2015. productivity fell 0.2%.

  • MarketWatch

    Pelosi backs revamped U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade pact

    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday announced that Democrats would back the revamped U.S-Mexico-Canada trade pact negotiated by President Donald Trump. At a press conference, Pelosi said Democrats were able to wrest last-minute concessions on enforcement that make the USMCA palatable. Analysts said Pelosi will try to pass the deal before the holiday break. Pelosi said she worked closely with Richard Trumka, the president of the AFL-CIO trade union, during the final negotiations over the weekend.

  • MarketWatch

    U.S. and China trade officials are planning for delay of Dec. 15 tariffs: report

    U.S. and Chinese trade negotiators are "laying the groundwork" to delay new tariffs that were set to go into force on Dec. 15, according to The Wall Street Journal. Economists are worried about these new tariffs because they would hit U.S. consumers, who have been the bright spot in the economy. The report, which quotes unnamed officials on both sides, said the two countries are haggling over how to get China to commit to massive purchases of U.S. farm products.

  • Paul Volcker was the last Fed chairman who said no pain, no gain
    MarketWatch

    Paul Volcker was the last Fed chairman who said no pain, no gain

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul A. Volcker, who died over the weekend at 92, was a towering figure both in stature (he was 6 foot, 7 inches tall) and in his role in American life: He broke the back of inflation for at least a generation, maybe two. A cottage industry of “Fed watchers” had to glean what the central bank was doing from what happened in money markets or, as I’ve liked to joke, by watching which way the ashes fell from Volcker’s signature cigars. When President Jimmy Carter appointed him in August 1979, the consumer-price index was rising at nearly a 12% annual clip.

  • MarketWatch

    Long-term government bond yields slip as traders gear up for Fed and ECB meetings

    U.S. Treasury yields fall slightly on Monday as traders stayed on the sidelines ahead of coming meetings by the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank.

  • MarketWatch

    Former Fed chairman Paul Volcker dies at 92

    Paul Volcker, the former Federal Reserve chairman who had a second career pushing for reform on Wall Street, has died at 92, according to numerous reports. Volcker was a legendary Fed chairman at the central bank for his fight against inflation in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Volcker was praised for establishing the Fed's credibility to control inflation. After the 2008 financial crisis, Volcker pushed for reform. He said in his memoir published in the fall of 2018 that he was worried about the impact of money in the political system.

  • Here’s the hard-money call for why the boom in the economy and stock market will continue
    MarketWatch

    Here’s the hard-money call for why the boom in the economy and stock market will continue

    You might think the hard-money, recession-at-every-corner crowd would be predicting an imminent reversal in the stock market given the 20% gain for the Dow Jones Industrial Average this year. Not necessarily.

  • MarketWatch

    U.S. government bond yields end higher after big gains in new jobs

    U.S. Treasury yields closed higher Friday after data from the Labor Department showed the U.S. created 266,000 new jobs in November, more than expected and the biggest monthly gain since January.

  • Former Fed advisor on jobs: Donald Trump and Jerome Powell can ‘take another victory lap’
    Yahoo Finance

    Former Fed advisor on jobs: Donald Trump and Jerome Powell can ‘take another victory lap’

    The November jobs report crushed expectations on Friday, sending the stock market surging.

  • U.S. sees hiring surge in November as economy adds 266,000 new jobs
    MarketWatch

    U.S. sees hiring surge in November as economy adds 266,000 new jobs

    The economy produced a robust 266,000 new jobs in November and the unemployment rate returned to a 50-year low, reflecting the resilience of a rock-solid U.S. labor market.

  • Even Skeptics Can’t Ignore These Jobs Numbers
    Bloomberg

    Even Skeptics Can’t Ignore These Jobs Numbers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- One of the most popular talking points in markets lately has been that the U.S. jobs report, long seen as a crucial indicator of the broader health of the economy, is actually not as important as it’s made out to be. Instead, it’s all about inflation, or central banks providing liquidity, or the latest news about striking a trade deal.For one day at least, it was all about jobs data again for bond traders.In what could only be described as blockbuster numbers, payrolls surged by 266,000, the most since January and beating all estimates in a Bloomberg survey calling for a 180,000 gain, according to a Labor Department report Friday. On top of that, the prior month’s advance was revised upward by 28,000, to 156,000. Average hourly earnings rose 3.1% from a year ago, topping expectations for 3% growth. The unemployment rate dipped to 3.5%, rather than sticking at 3.6% as analysts anticipated. Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields soared almost 8 basis points in a flash, climbing to 1.86%, the highest since mid-November. It was the biggest instant reaction to payrolls data the market has experienced all year. The only somewhat comparable move was on July 5, when yields ended the trading session 10 basis points higher, after a relatively small increase at first. But even then, when job gains trounced estimates by 64,000, the previous month’s figures were revised lower, the unemployment rate unexpectedly increased and wage growth fell short. It wasn’t across-the-board strength like these November numbers.The data was so good, in fact, that futures traders have finally started to believe that the Federal Reserve will truly hold interest rates steady next year. Fed funds futures are now only pricing in 23 basis points of easing for all of 2020, or less than one typical quarter-point cut. These numbers should calm any fears of an impending recession, and with it another yield-curve inversion.Given that the hurdle for the central bank to raise interest rates again is so high, traders will probably hesitate to whittle those wagers down much further. But it should simplify Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s message to investors at his Dec. 11 press conference: Monetary policy is in a good place and the central bank will be patient from here to see if inflation picks up. And the economy? It’s definitely in a good place — the latest payrolls report proves it.To contact the author of this story: Brian Chappatta at bchappatta1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brian Chappatta is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering debt markets. He previously covered bonds for Bloomberg News. He is also a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    Markets In 'Goldilocks' Mode Amid Strong Job Gains, Steady Wage Gains

    November turned into an employment bonanza, helped in part by the return of workers from a strike at General Motors Company (NYSE: GM). If you add the Labor Department’s upward revisions of a combined 41,000 jobs for September and October to this impressive November tally, new jobs growth has averaged a very healthy 205,000 the last three months and 180,000 for the year to date. Not too shabby for an economy that many analysts say is in the last stages of a growth phase.