005930.KS - Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

KSE - KSE Delayed Price. Currency in KRW
46,500.00
+800.00 (+1.75%)
At close: 3:30PM KST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close45,700.00
Open46,000.00
Bid46,500.00 x 0
Ask46,550.00 x 0
Day's Range45,750.00 - 46,600.00
52 Week Range36,850.00 - 48,450.00
Volume12,562,635
Avg. Volume11,007,358
Market Cap309.328T
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.11
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateJul 29, 2019 - Aug 2, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield1,416.00 (3.10%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-03-28
1y Target Est54,903.00
  • Bloomberg18 hours ago

    Apple Hires Key Chip Designer From ARM as Own Efforts Ramp Up

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. hired one of ARM Holdings Inc.’s top chip engineers as the iPhone maker looks to expand its own chip development to more powerful devices, including the Mac, and new categories like a headset.The company hired Mike Filippo in May for a chip architect position, according to his LinkedIn profile. At ARM, Filippo was a lead engineer behind chip designs that power the vast majority of the world’s smartphones and tablets and was leading a new push into parts for computers. ARM, owned by SoftBank Group Corp., designs microprocessors and licenses technology that is fundamental to the chip development efforts of Apple, Samsung Electronics Co., Qualcomm Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co.Prior to his work at ARM, Filippo was also a key designer at chipmakers Advanced Micro Devices and Intel Corp. ARM confirmed Filippo’s departure. Apple didn’t respond to a request for comment.“Mike was a long-time valuable member of the ARM community,” a spokesman for the U.K.-based company said. “We appreciate all of his efforts and wish him well in his next endeavor.”For Apple, the hire could help fill the void left by the departure of Gerard Williams III earlier this year. Williams was Apple’s head architect of chips used in the iPhone and iPad. Apple’s A series chips power its mobile devices using ARM technology. Its Mac computers have used processors from Intel for nearly two decades.The company initiated a plan several years ago to replace Intel chips in its Mac computers with processors based on the ARM architecture as early as 2020. Filippo’s experience in more advanced chips like those in servers would assist in that effort. The company is also planning to expand its in-house chip making work to new device categories like a headset that meshes augmented and virtual reality, Bloomberg News has reported.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Gurman in San Francisco at mgurman1@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • BTS Made an App That Lets You Chat With Its Members (Sort Of)
    Bloomberg2 days ago

    BTS Made an App That Lets You Chat With Its Members (Sort Of)

    (Bloomberg) -- K-pop sensation BTS has racked up a string of firsts over an astonishing six-year run. Now the seven-member group star in their very own smartphone game, marrying two of South Korea’s hottest exports.Netmarble Corp., the country’s biggest mobile-app publisher, has unveiled a game featuring global K-Pop phenom BTS, the latest attempt to wed the country’s tech and entertainment industries to drive economic growth.“BTS World” contains previously undisclosed videos and photos of the boy band. The game takes players to their pre-debut days to recruit and train the singers. Users can pay to quicken the process of guiding the seven young men to stardom. Created by local developer Takeone Company Corp. and published by Netmarble, the game also features video and text chats with BTS members based on pre-written scripts.It’s the first major mobile title to focus exclusively on a K-Pop group, a testament to the rapidly growing clout of two of Korea’s most promising exports -- games and K-Pop -- as Hyundai cars struggle to regain momentum and Samsung semiconductors undergo an industry downturn.BTS or Bangtan Sonyeondan, which translates as Bulletproof Boy Scouts, has amassed millions of fans around the world thanks in large part to social media. The band’s Love Yourself campaign, which calls on people to take better care of themselves and encourages them to speak out on social issues, has resonated in particular with young fans.“Managing BTS myself would make me feel closer to the members,” said Paik Ji-min, a 29-year-old South Korean fan who flew to London to attend a BTS concert and said she would be willing to spend about 50,000 won (around $43) playing the game. “Just the thought of it makes me smile ear to ear.”Netmarble already plans a sequel to BTS World, seeking to maximize profit from what has arguably become the biggest K-Pop success after singer Psy. BTS has 20 million followers on Twitter and has made television appearances on Saturday Night Live and Ellen DeGeneres’s talk show. This year, the band sold out London’s 90,000-seat Wembley Stadium in just 90 minutes.The company’s founder, Bang Jun-hyuk, teamed up with relative Bang Si-hyuk of Big Hit Entertainment, the agency behind BTS, to develop the game. The entrepreneur is betting the recipe will re-energize growth at Netmarble, which trades about 20% lower than when it listed in 2017.“Even though it’s based on story-telling, as you progress you can discover a lot of missions and gaming elements,” Seungwon Lee, Netmarble’s chief global officer, told Bloomberg Television. “It’s sufficient incentive to keep motivating users to play.”BTS creator Bang Si-hyuk, who is also known as Hitman, told Bloomberg in 2017 that the company was diversifying into intellectual property-protected content that could possibly multiply its revenue. Big Hit is now worth an estimated $2 billion, according to the Hyundai Research Institute. The company is drawing on the popularity of the band to collaborate with Line Corp. for character merchandise and Mattel Inc. for dolls. The K-pop industry is worth about $5 billion, according to the government-affiliated Korea Creative Content Agency.Read More: High School Dropout Turns Billionaire on Games Firm IPONetmarble, whose titles include Lineage 2 Revolution and Marvel Future Fight, ranked 5th among publishers of Google Play and Apple iOS apps last year in terms of revenue, according to analytics firm App Annie. Founded in 2000, the Seoul-based company has drawn backing from Chinese giant Tencent Holdings Ltd. and South Korean conglomerate CJ Group.Vey-Sern Ling, a Bloomberg Intelligence analyst, said it may be relatively easy to generate money from players because they’re already fans who display a strong willingness to pay for BTS content. But the lifespan of the game could be limited. “Once the content is consumed there should be very little reason to play on, just like how you wouldn’t watch the same movie multiple times,” Ling said.Read More: ‘Hitman’ Worth $770 Million With K-Pop Craze Rocking the PlanetTo contact the reporters on this story: Sohee Kim in Seoul at skim847@bloomberg.net;Sam Kim in Seoul at skim609@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • If Loeb Likes Breakups, Another Target Awaits
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    If Loeb Likes Breakups, Another Target Awaits

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Dan Loeb wants to split up Sony Corp. to enhance its value. The company isn’t the only household name in Japanese electronics that might benefit from the treatment.Panasonic Corp. shares have dropped more than 40% over the past 12 months after a partnership with Tesla Inc. disappointed; the company forecast earnings will decline; and a restructuring plan put forward last month failed to convince investors. The firm is trading on a multiple of 3.8 times enterprise value to Ebitda, compared with a five-year average of 4.6 times.Loeb’s Third Point LLC has called for a spinoff of Sony’s semiconductor business, aiming to reduce the stock’s so-called conglomerate discount – the situation where a company is valued at less than the sum of the different businesses it owns. It’s an analysis that could equally be applied to Panasonic.Last month, the Osaka-based company released a mid-term plan that will increase its number of divisions to seven from four. Panasonic aims to shift its focus away from the automotive business, which is struggling under the shadow cast by the difficulties in its relationship with Tesla. The electronics maker also announced a series of partnerships and alliances, and estimated restructuring costs of about 90 billion yen ($840 million), according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.Analysts say Panasonic still doesn’t have a coherent strategy, and investors clearly want more change. So could a breakup be the solution?The answer from a sum-of-the-parts analysis is a clear: maybe. If Panasonic listed all its business segments separately and they traded at the mid-point of their peer-group ranges of between 4 times and 9 times enterprise value to Ebitda, then the combined value would be 2% higher than the company’s current market capitalization of about $20 billion. At the high end of the ranges, Panasonic could increase its value by as much as 32%. At the low end, though, there’s a similar amount of downside.(1)Analysts in Japan have questioned Loeb’s proposal for Sony. While they lauded his effort to improve the company’s valuation, they also cast doubt on whether the activist investor’s proposals were feasible or made strategic sense. A Sony split may unlock value now but, as my Bloomberg Opinion colleague Tim Culpan asked, what’s the vision for the future? As Sony analysts have pointed out, Loeb has reversed course since 2013, when he recommended that the company sell part of its film unit.This uncertainty is precisely where a breakup proposal may make sense for Panasonic, though. Pulling apart its various businesses – grouped broadly under appliances, automotive and industrial systems, connected solutions and eco solutions – would enable investors to put their money where they see value and growth prospects, without being encumbered by laggard businesses.For instance, sales for the connected solutions segment rose 6.9%(2) in the 2019 fiscal year, helped by the Tokyo Olympics in 2020 and growing demand from businesses to help automate tasks. Itochu Techno-Solutions Corp., which competes in a similar business, is trading on a forward price-earnings ratio of 23 times.Panasonic thought the automotive business would drive its profitability over the past three years. Even here, running the unit separately could create more value. Panasonic has teamed up with Toyota Motor Corp. and already has partners other than Tesla. With demand for electric cars and the pace of adoption being reassessed, the company could take time to leverage its technology advantage. In the process, the segment’s rising fixed costs won’t weigh down other more profitable businesses. In fact, investors might give a standalone battery business a higher valuation, as they’ve done with South Korean battery-makers Samsung SDI Co. and LG Chem Ltd.Analysts at Credit Suisse AG downgraded the stock on Friday, noting that they see “no signs of a rebound in earnings in the near term,” and that it was unclear how the company and its profit would look after the restructuring. Earnings at the auto business, where the analysts earlier saw potential for sales growth, is unlikely to improve over the medium term, they said.There are additional reasons why a breakup should be considered. For one, the government is incentivizing spinoffs with tax breaks. Meanwhile, domestic institutional investors are becoming more activist: The rejection rate for takeover defense measures has risen over the past six years to 80.5% from 40%, according to Goldman Sachs. That’s close to the 85% rate for foreign investors.Panasonic has some thinking to do. Loeb, meanwhile, might just have a new target. --With assistance from Elaine He. (1) Sum-of-the-parts analysis for Panasonic is based on FY2019 operating profit for each segment and used the following assumptions:1. Average enterprise value to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization for peer group of each segment.2. A range of two times above and below average multiple.(2) Includes exchange-rate effects.To contact the author of this story: Anjani Trivedi at atrivedi39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Samsung's new SmartThings camera and smart plug don't need the hub
    Engadget3 days ago

    Samsung's new SmartThings camera and smart plug don't need the hub

    Samsung is adding a camera, a WiFi smart plug and a smart bulb to its range ofSmartThings devices available in the US

  • Indonesian iPhone Retailer Surges as It Nears Partnership With Juul
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    Indonesian iPhone Retailer Surges as It Nears Partnership With Juul

    (Bloomberg) -- Shares of PT Erajaya Swasembada, an Indonesian distributor of Apple Inc.’s iPhones and Samsung Electronics Co.’s smartphones, surged the most in more than a year after the company said it was close to a tie-up with electronic cigarette manufacturer Juul Labs Inc.Erajaya will soon announce details of the partnership with Juul, Budiarto Halim, president director, said by phone on Monday. “I’m currently bound by a non-disclosure agreement,” he said.Juul has signed an exclusive distribution deal with one of Erajaya’s units and will begin to retail e-cigarettes in greater Jakarta area, Java and Bali from the end of this month, Citigroup Inc. said in a report, without saying where it got the information. In the launch stage, the product will consist of Juul basic kit, charger and refill kits, analysts Vivi Lie and Ferry Wong wrote in the report.Juul’s device will have a one-year warranty and the roll-out will be supported by marketing campaigns on television, digital, billboards and print media, Citi said. Still, its impact on combustible cigarette market will be relatively limited and it is more likely Juul will attract vape users and non-smokers in urban areas, it said.Indonesia is one of the world’s largest markets for cigarettes and known for a variety of clove cigarettes it produces. The market is dominated by cigarette makers PT Hanjaya Mandala Sampoerna, a Philip Morris International Inc. unit, and PT Gudang Garam.Erajaya’s shares jumped 19%, the most since April 30, 2018, while its Indonesian counterpart PT Hanjaya Mandala Sampoerna fell 1.5%. The nation’s benchmark index Jakarta Composite Index closed 0.4% lower.(Updates share moves in final paragraph.)\--With assistance from Rieka Rahadiana.To contact the reporter on this story: Tassia Sipahutar in Jakarta at ssipahutar@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Divya Balji at dbalji1@bloomberg.net, Thomas Kutty AbrahamFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Samsung exec says the Galaxy Fold is ‘ready to hit the market’
    TechCrunch8 days ago

    Samsung exec says the Galaxy Fold is ‘ready to hit the market’

    As we asked back in February, “We're ready for foldable phones, but are theyready for us?” The answer, so far, has been an enthusiastic, “not really

  • Huawei’s Troubles Are a Big Opportunity for Ericsson and Nokia
    Bloomberg8 days ago

    Huawei’s Troubles Are a Big Opportunity for Ericsson and Nokia

    (Bloomberg) -- Over the past two decades, China’s Huawei Technologies Co. has come to dominate the global telecom equipment market, winning contracts with a mix of sophisticated technology and attractive prices. Its rise squeezed Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB, which responded by cutting jobs and making acquisitions. Now, with Huawei at the center of a U.S.-China trade war, the tide is turning.Nokia and Ericsson—fierce rivals themselves—have recently wrested notable long-term deals from Huawei to build 5G wireless networks, to enable everything from autonomous cars to robot surgery. Analysts say more could come their way as Huawei grapples with a U.S. export ban and restrictions from other governments concerned that its equipment could enable Chinese espionage.“Huawei will, for the foreseeable future, face a broader cloud of suspicion,” said John Butler, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in New York. “Nokia and Ericsson are well positioned to benefit.”In May, the European companies both won 5G contracts from SoftBank Group Corp.’s Japanese telecom unit, replacing Huawei and Chinese peer ZTE Corp. Ericsson signed a similar pact in March with Denmark’s biggest phone company, TDC A/S, which had worked with Huawei since 2013 to modernize and manage its network.Other carriers, expecting government curbs on Huawei, have started removing its equipment from sensitive parts of their systems. BT Group Plc is taking Huawei out of its network core, and Vodafone Group Plc has suspended core equipment purchases from Huawei for its European networks. Deutsche Telekom AG, which has Huawei throughout its 4G system, is re-evaluating its purchasing strategy.Nokia and Ericsson are Europe’s final survivors of a merciless winnowing of more than a half-dozen telecom equipment providersAs dozens of phone companies—including those in Canada, Germany and France—plan to choose 5G suppliers in the coming months, Cisco Systems Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are also vying for deals. But the key beneficiaries of Huawei’s difficulties are likely to be the two Europeans, which compete directly with the Chinese company in supplying radio-access network equipment.Since last year, the Trump administration has pushed allies to bar Huawei from 5G, citing risks about state spying—allegations the company has denied. The move in May to block Huawei’s access to U.S. suppliers escalated the campaign. The company’s founder, Ren Zhengfei, now predicts the U.S. sanctions will cut its revenue by $30 billion over the coming two years.Outside the U.S., security concerns have led Australia, Japan and Taiwan to bar Huawei from 5G systems. The Chinese company also risks losing meaningful work in Europe and emerging markets where countries could follow with their own limits, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.Publicly, executives from Nokia and Ericsson have been careful not to come off as critical of Huawei. Both manufacture in China and sell gear to Chinese phone carriers, and Nokia has a big research and development presence there. Nokia says it has already been forced to shift some of its supply chain away from China to reduce the impact of tariffs imposed by the Trump administration.QuicktakeHow Huawei Became a Target for GovernmentsInstead of piling on Huawei, the European carriers have trumpeted their 5G successes, each using slightly different metrics. Ericsson claims it has the most publicly announced 5G contracts—21—while Nokia says it has raked in more commercial 5G deals than any other vendor (42). Huawei says it has signed 46 5G contracts. A spokesman for Huawei declined to comment further about its position relative to rivals.Ericsson is “first with 5G,” after building high-speed networks for companies such as AT&T Inc., Swisscom AG in Switzerland and Australia’s Telstra Corp., said Chief Technology Officer Erik Ekudden. “You see that in some markets that we are attracting more customers.”Nokia is winning 5G deals “quite handsomely,” Chief Executive Officer Rajeev Suri told Bloomberg TV on June 10.While Suri said more carriers are likely to swap out Huawei gear in countries that have announced restrictions, the situation is less clear in Europe. “We don’t know yet the impact of specific operator plans,” he said in an interview. “We also don’t know where this geopolitical thing will end up.”Nokia and Ericsson are Europe’s final survivors of a merciless winnowing of more than a half-dozen telecom equipment providers. Bloated costs, a cyclical marketplace, cash-strapped customers, and the relentless rise of Huawei—aided by access to generous Chinese state financing—helped push the likes of Canada’s Nortel Networks Corp. and Germany’s Siemens AG out of the industry.Nokia paid some $2 billion in 2013 to buy Siemens out of a joint venture established to compete against Ericsson and Huawei. Then in 2015, it spent another almost $18 billion acquiring Alcatel-Lucent to broaden its product offering after pushing through more than 25,000 job cuts in the preceding three years. Still, Huawei’s share of the $33 billion of sales in the global mobile infrastructure market surged to 31% in 2018 from 13% in 2010, IHS Markit data show.Huawei, despite its troubles, remains a potent rival. Many phone companies in Europe deem its base stations, switches and routers technologically superior. Fully excluding Huawei and ZTE from 5G would raise radio-access network costs for European phone companies by 40%, or 55 billion euros ($62 billion), the GSMA industry group predicts in an unpublished report seen by Bloomberg. Nokia and Ericsson would have to almost double production to absorb Huawei and ZTE’s business in Europe and could struggle to meet demand, the GSMA report says.Quicktake5G and EspionageBengt Nordstrom, CEO of telecom consultancy Northstream AB, says the situation is perilous for everyone in the industry, as vendors’ budgets could be hit if Huawei faces greater restrictions. “Many component suppliers are already in a tough situation,” Nordstrom said. “They need to spend a lot of money on research, and that means they need access to the entire global market.”For carriers, swapping vendors isn’t as simple as flipping a switch. It takes about two years to plan and implement such a technology shift and install the new equipment, Nordstrom said.Both Nokia and Ericsson are working to make it easier for carriers to switch. Nokia has developed what it calls a “thin layer” of its 4G technology to connect to a new 5G system, allowing a carrier to avoid a wholesale swap of another supplier’s equipment. Ericsson also has a solution to allow a carrier to swap out only a portion of existing infrastructure, and says it can make some areas work side-by-side with Ericsson’s 5G gear.Nokia and Ericsson can agree on one thing: Claims of Huawei’s technological superiority are overblown. They note that they’re involved in the latest networks in the U.S., where carriers are rolling out 5G faster than the Europeans.“We compete quite favorably with Huawei,” Suri said, “with or without the current security concerns.”(Updates to add Nokia and Ericsson production estimate in sixth-last paragraph. An earlier version of the story corrected the ninth paragraph to reflect that Telstra Corp. is an Australian company.)\--With assistance from Caroline Hyde, Kati Pohjanpalo and Angelina Rascouet.To contact the authors of this story: Stefan Nicola in Berlin at snicola2@bloomberg.netNiclas Rolander in Stockholm at nrolander@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, David RocksFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Samsung's Galaxy Note 10 launch reportedly planned for August 7th
    Engadget8 days ago

    Samsung's Galaxy Note 10 launch reportedly planned for August 7th

    While we're waiting for news on the foldable Galaxy phone, Samsung is stillplanning its usual big event to launch the next Galaxy Note

  • Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks
    Engadget10 days ago

    Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks

    This morning a Samsung customer support account tweeted an odd warning that,to prevent malicious software attacks on your smart TV, you should scan it forviruses every few weeks

  • Reuters11 days ago

    Huawei prepares for 40%-60% fall in international smartphone shipments- Bloomberg

    Huawei Technologies Co Ltd is preparing for a 40% to 60% decline in international smartphone shipments, Bloomberg reported https://bloom.bg/2XQRiqH on Sunday. The Chinese technology company is looking at options that include pulling the latest model of its marquee overseas smartphone, the Honor 20, according to the article, which cited people familiar with the matter. Executives will be monitoring the launch and may cut off shipments if the sales are poor, it said.

  • Samsung's Lee Looks Beyond Next 10 Years With 6G, System Chips
    Bloomberg11 days ago

    Samsung's Lee Looks Beyond Next 10 Years With 6G, System Chips

    (Bloomberg) -- Samsung Electronics Co. Vice Chairman Jay Y. Lee said the company will pursue investment in future businesses including sixth-generation mobile networks and system semiconductors as the South Korean tech giant faces a rapidly changing global business environment that has already put pressure on profit.Lee, the company’s de facto leader, last week held discussions with Samsung executives on potential collaboration with platform companies on 6G mobile networks, blockchain technologies and artificial intelligence, Samsung said in an emailed statement on Sunday.It’s the first time that Lee has publicly discussed the potential for 6G technology, as Samsung and rivals including Apple Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co. race to commercialize services based on 5G networks, which launched in South Korea in April.“We should challenge ourselves with a resolution to make new foundations, moving beyond the scope of protecting our past achievements,” Lee said in the statement.In addition to guidance on investment plans for its system semiconductors, the executives also reviewed risk-response plans for Samsung’s chip business and discussed challenges posed by structural changes in the technology industry, according to the statement.Samsung’s statement didn’t specifically mention ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China or bans on rival Huawei, two issues that have weighed on the global economic outlook and complicated supply chains for manufacturers.\--With assistance from Sam Kim.To contact the reporter on this story: Sohee Kim in Seoul at skim847@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Andrew Davis at abdavis@bloomberg.net, Tony Jordan, Stanley JamesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Samsung's Galaxy Fold delay could extend through July?
    Engadget12 days ago

    Samsung's Galaxy Fold delay could extend through July?

    The strange case of Samsung's Galaxy Fold may drag on throughout the summer, according to a report in The Korea Herald . The outlet -- which reported in May that Samsung would reach a conclusion on the launch in a couple of days -- now says that according to company officials, if it were going to launch in July then they'd be preparing by now. It also mentions CEO DJ Koh telling another outlet just last week that the device would arrive before July. So what's the truth? At this point it's tough to discern beyond the company's actions. In a week, we'll be two months clear of Samsung announcing a delay in the launch after several reviewers experienced broken units. A week later Samsung told investors it would still release the device , and planned to announce a new launch date in the coming weeks.

  • Loeb's Sony Split Makes Sense. But Then What?
    Bloomberg13 days ago

    Loeb's Sony Split Makes Sense. But Then What?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Dan Loeb wants to split up Sony Corp.In a seven-page letter and 100-slide presentation, Third Point LLC’s founder and CEO outlined what Sony’s shares have been saying for years: The company is worth more than the sum of its parts.Any Sony investor ought to share the frustration of Third Point, which owns a $1.5 billion stake. After posting losses for six out of seven years, Sony just notched its fourth consecutive annual profit (up 87% in the year through March 31).  While this turnaround lifted shares, they’ve remained largely stagnant since the end of October 2017, when PlayStation demand spurred a fourfold increase in quarterly operating profit.The company’s return on common equity went from negative 5.5% in fiscal 2015 to 27.3% in the most recent year, while its return on invested capital has expanded almost fivefold in the past two years. Yet the shares are trading at a mere 12.6 times estimated forward 12-month earnings, below the 18.6 times for Nintendo Co. and 14.9 times for Canon Inc.(1)To that end, Loeb’s latest push for change at the Japanese electronics giant includes a request to spin off the semiconductor business and keep core Sony focused on gaming, music and pictures. The mechanics are deceptively simple, and thanks to new tax laws in Japan, potentially quite lucrative.Sony needn’t run an IPO in the traditional sense of selling some shares in one of its divisions. Instead, it can split into two listed companies: New Sony and Sony Technologies. The latter would house the chip business, and every existing Sony shareholder would get an equivalent stake in both. To do this, management would need to admit something that’s been clear for a decade: Sony messed up.Twenty years ago, the company was poised to become what Apple Inc. is today. Back then, Sony owned the portable music market. It invented the Walkman, and when CDs came along it brought out the Discman. The advent of digital music, a catalog of its own, and a range of components to put it all together meant that Sony should have invented the iPod and iTunes. But it didn’t. And, as Steve Jobs proved, you don’t need to own the various parts to dominate the whole. And yet Sony has held on to these disparate parts far longer than it should have.In my view, Sony should keep all of its various divisions together if, and only if, there are demonstrable synergies. Samsung Electronics Co. proves that such synergies aren’t only possible but extremely valuable. The South Korean company’s ownership of displays, memory chips and semiconductor manufacturing allows it to keep churning out the best smartphones every year (that is, when they don’t explode). Yet Loeb’s strategy doesn’t adequately address what Sony should do after that. Third Point mentions that post split, New Sony would have room to raise debt, given its inefficient balance sheet, should it need to make acquisitions. It already has $25 billion in total cash, and net cash of $3.6 billion while free cash flow last year was $8.6 billion.Third Point notes that Sony has the capacity for $34 billion in buybacks over the next three years while keeping net leverage(2) under 1 times. Unfortunately the two buybacks it already announced this year, for a total of 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion), have done little to boost the stock. Perhaps share performance was muted by the tough macroeconomic environment, especially in tech. If that’s the case, then it’s worth noting that a global slowdown and continued U.S.-China tensions aren’t likely to disappear anytime soon. The case for a reorganization is compelling and shouldn’t be ignored. But both Loeb and Sony management need to spend more time working out what to do with the New Sony.(1) Third Point notes that one reason for a split would be to allow the new entities to be better compared against appropriate peer groups.(2) Third Point defines net leverage as net debt/Ebitda.To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • AT&T cancels Samsung Galaxy Fold orders
    TechCrunch14 days ago

    AT&T cancels Samsung Galaxy Fold orders

    AT&T has cancelled early orders for the Samsung Galaxy Fold. Tom's Guide first reported the cancellation, noting that AT&T said the Galaxy Fold would be available again to order as soon as Samsung announces a new launch date. The Samsung Galaxy Fold was originally scheduled to launch on April 26.

  • AT&T cancels Galaxy Fold pre-orders due to lengthy delay
    Engadget14 days ago

    AT&T cancels Galaxy Fold pre-orders due to lengthy delay

    AT&T held on to people's Galaxy Fold pre-orders even after Best Buy cancelled reservations back in May. Now that it's been almost a couple of months since Samsung's foldable device was supposed to come out, though, the carrier has decided that it's time to void pre-orders, as well. According to Tom's Guide , AT&T has sent out emails telling customers that their foldable phone pre-purchases have been cancelled. "Unfortunately," the letter reads, "Samsung delayed the release of the Fold, which means we can't ship your phone." The AT&T customers affected by the cancellation will receive a $100 promotion card and will be able to place another order once Samsung has a final release date.

  • Samsung's next The Wall TV can stretch to 292 inches with 8K
    Engadget15 days ago

    Samsung's next The Wall TV can stretch to 292 inches with 8K

    Samsung's 146-inch The Wall TV? Appropriately, Samsung is hyping up the use of its Ambient Mode to decorate your space with art when you're not using the TV. Samsung hasn't detailed the pricing as we write this, but let's be honest -- if you need to ask, you're probably not the target audience for this behemoth.

  • Reuters16 days ago

    New chip to let headphones respond to Amazon's Alexa by name

    Knowles Corp, a major supplier of microphones to Apple's iPhone and many other smart devices, on Tuesday released a new chip that will allow battery-powered wireless headphones to respond to Amazon's Alexa voice assistant by saying the assistant's name. Previously, users of most Alexa-enabled headphones have had to press a button on the side of the headphones to awaken the assistant. Consumers have become accustomed to calling out names for popular voice assistants, such as Amazon.com Inc's Alexa, Apple Inc's Siri or Google Inc's Google Assistant.

  • TheStreet.com17 days ago

    How to Use Samsung Pay

    Samsung Pay is a mobile payment and digital wallet application released originally in South Korea in 2015, supporting contactless payments and near-field communications, along with magnetic secure transmission to support magnetic stripe-only payment terminals. Samsung acquired LoopPay, which was a crowdfunded startup company, in February 2015. Before Samsung Pay, Google introduced Android Pay - now Google Pay - the same year.

  • Reuters17 days ago

    Vietnam's Vingroup says new phone plant can make 125 million units a year

    Vingroup JSC, Vietnam's biggest listed firm by market value, said on Monday it has started work on a second smartphone factory with a capacity to produce 125 million units a year. The new factory in the capital, Hanoi, will vastly increase Vingroup's current capacity of five million units at its facility in the northern city of Haiphong, the conglomerate said in a statement. Construction is expected to be completed by early 2020 and the jump in capacity will help the company meet orders from Europe and the United States, Vingroup CEO Nguyen Viet Quang said in the statement.

  • Reuters18 days ago

    China calls in foreign tech firms after Huawei sales ban - sources

    China summoned global technology companies for talks last week following last month's U.S. ban on selling technology to China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd , two people familiar with the matter told Reuters on Sunday. The blacklisting of Huawei, the world's largest maker of telecoms network equipment, bars U.S. companies from supplying it with many goods and services due to what Washington said were national security issues, a potentially crippling blow that sharply escalated U.S.-China trade tensions. Soon afterwards, Beijing announced it would release its own list of "unreliable" foreign entities.

  • Samsung Q70R midrange QLED TV brings style and substance
    CNET3 days ago

    Samsung Q70R midrange QLED TV brings style and substance

    With full-array local dimming and Samsung's sweet design and features, the Q70R is a solid choice for Samsung fans who don't have money to burn.