009540.KS - Korea Shipbuilding & Offshore Engineering Co.,Ltd.

KSE - KSE Delayed Price. Currency in KRW
124,500.00
+500.00 (+0.40%)
At close: 2:52PM KST
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Previous Close124,000.00
Open123,500.00
Bid124,500.00 x 0
Ask125,000.00 x 0
Day's Range122,500.00 - 125,000.00
52 Week Range93,800.00 - 146,500.00
Volume82,292
Avg. Volume188,016
Market Cap8.804T
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.09
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateOct 28, 2019 - Nov 2, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend Date2013-12-27
1y Target Est162,333.00
  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Volkswagen's Renk first in line of potential divestitures - sources

    Volkswagen is likely to launch the sale of transmissions maker Renk in the autumn as the German carmaker streamlines operations to free up funds for investment in electric vehicles, people close to the matter said. Volkswagen said last month it would explore a full or partial sale, joint ventures or partnership for Renk, which has a market capitalisation of 700 million euros ($785 million). Renk is 76%-owned by Volkswagen's family ownership holding Porsche SE, with the rest of the shares widely held.

  • Reuters

    Trafigura ships more Asian gasoline to Americas on new tanker

    * Shipment comes at a time of refinery outages in U.S. SINGAPORE, March 28 (Reuters) - Commodity trader Trafigura is shipping this month a second newly built crude tanker with Asian gasoline onboard to South America amid strong demand in the West, four industry sources who closely monitor petrol trade flows said on Thursday.

  • Reuters

    Samsung Heavy turned down offer to buy Daewoo - KDB

    SEOUL (Reuters) - Samsung Heavy Industries turned down an offer to take over rival shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, the top shareholder of Daewoo said on Tuesday. State-funded Korea ...

  • South Korea to combine world's two biggest shipbuilders in $2 billion deal
    Reuters

    South Korea to combine world's two biggest shipbuilders in $2 billion deal

    Hyundai Heavy Industries, the world's biggest shipbuilding group, has announced a share swap deal worth 2.1 trillion won ($1.98 billion) to take over second-ranked Daewoo and create a global heavyweight controlling over 20 percent of the market. State-funded Korea Development Bank (KDB) owns 55.7 percent of Daewoo, and has said it intends to sell the stake and consolidate the country's three biggest shipbuilders - which includes Samsung Heavy Industries Co Ltd - into two. The combination of two of the giant shipbuilders would ease competition and excess capacity, which have depressed ship prices, KDB Chairman Lee Dong-gull said at a news conference.

  • Reuters

    South Korea's KDB signs conditional deal with Hyundai Heavy over Daewoo stake sale

    SEOUL (Reuters) - Korea Development Bank, the biggest shareholder of Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co Ltd, on Thursday said it has signed a conditional deal with Hyundai Heavy Industries Group ...

  • Hyundai Heavy held talks with Daewoo Shipbuilding to buy stake - official
    Reuters

    Hyundai Heavy held talks with Daewoo Shipbuilding to buy stake - official

    SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korean shipbuilding giant, Hyundai Heavy Industries Group, is interested in buying a stake in rival Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, a Hyundai official told Reuters on ...

  • Reuters

    Saudi Aramco doubles down on S.Korea with $1.6 bln bet on Hyundai Oilbank

    State-owned Saudi Aramco plans to invest up to $1.6 billion for a nearly 20 percent stake in South Korean refiner Hyundai Oilbank, expanding its foothold in one of its biggest Asian buyers of crude oil. Saudi Aramco is already the biggest shareholder in South Korea's No.3 refiner, S-Oil Corp, with a 63.41 percent stake, and the latest deal should help Aramco boost crude oil sales to Hyundai Oilbank, the South's smallest refiner by capacity.

  • Reuters

    Empty shipyard and suicides as 'Hyundai Town' grapples with grim future

    When Lee Dong-hee came to Ulsan to work for Hyundai Heavy Industries five years ago, shipyards in the city known as Hyundai Town operated day and night and workers could make triple South Korea's annual average salary. To support their family, Lee's wife took a minimum wage job at a Hyundai Motor supplier. The Lee family's fortunes mirror the decline of Ulsan, which is now reeling from Chinese competition, rising labour costs and its over-reliance on Hyundai - one of the giant, family-run conglomerates or chaebol that dominate South Korea.