0939.HK - China Construction Bank Corporation

HKSE - HKSE Delayed Price. Currency in HKD
5.690
-0.100 (-1.73%)
As of 1:31PM HKT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close5.790
Open5.650
Bid5.690 x 0
Ask5.700 x 0
Day's Range5.620 - 5.730
52 Week Range5.550 - 7.210
Volume265,428,135
Avg. Volume323,848,398
Market Cap1.441T
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.24
PE Ratio (TTM)5.00
EPS (TTM)1.139
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.35 (6.03%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-02
1y Target Est9.19
  • China Traders Bet Big on a Lagging Bank Stock in Hong Kong
    Bloomberg

    China Traders Bet Big on a Lagging Bank Stock in Hong Kong

    (Bloomberg) -- It’s trading near its lowest levels since 2016 and has lost $44 billion in value since an April peak -- but mainland investors can’t seem to get enough of China Construction Bank Corp.The Hong Kong-listed shares of the lender, one of China’s big four state-controlled banks, have seen mainland inflows of HK$6.2 billion ($790 million) over the past 19 sessions through Aug. 14, based on the latest data compiled by Bloomberg. That’s more than 17% of Chinese investors’ total spending during the buying streak.A low valuation and healthy dividend yield make it attractive, said Terry Sun, a Hong Kong-based analyst with CMB International Securities Ltd. China Construction Bank’s A shares traded at about a 40% premium over the Hong Kong-listed shares last week, the biggest gap among the big four lenders.China’s central bank introduced a revamped market benchmark rate this week aimed at lowering borrowing costs for households and companies to support the economy. While that’s seen to bring down industry rates, Sun expects the bank’s net interest margin to be more stable than peers, and says its large proportion of retail loans will help shield it from the impact.Personal banking contributed to nearly 40% of China Construction Bank’s revenues for last year, the highest ratio among the big four lenders, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The stock rose as much as 1.4% in Hong Kong before paring the gain to 0.7% Wednesday.Hong Kong was the world’s worst-performing major stock market over the past month, roiled by weeks of protests, a weakening yuan and the fallout from the China- U.S. trade war. That has helped bring valuations on the Hang Seng Index down towards the lowest since late 2016, encouraging the buying streak from mainland investors.China Construction Bank traded at a record low of below 0.64 times book value earlier this month, and its estimated dividend yield is at 6.2%, higher than that of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd., the nation’s biggest lender and another favourite of mainland investors.Further upside is expected in the coming months, with earnings to offer encouragement, said Wang Zhen, an analyst with UOB-Kay Hian Holdings Ltd. “As an industry leader, the bank has strong ability to adapt to and withstand the unfavourable macro-environment. The stock should perform well in the coming months.”(Updates with Wednesday’s close.)\--With assistance from Jun Luo.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Amanda Wang in Shanghai at twang234@bloomberg.net;Mengchen Lu in Shanghai at mlu157@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sofia Horta e Costa at shortaecosta@bloomberg.net, David Watkins, Charlie ZhuFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China Could Use a Libor-Rigging Scandal
    Bloomberg

    China Could Use a Libor-Rigging Scandal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Eighteen banks coordinating to calibrate a market-driven rate – cynics could be forgiven for thinking that another Libor-rigging scandal is around the corner in China. Perversely, such an outcome would be a good sign for its financial system. Over the weekend, the People’s Bank of China made the loan prime rate, which banks offer to their best clients, the new benchmark for pricing corporate loans. It works a bit like Libor, the key global rate that determines borrowing costs for everything from student loans to derivatives: Every month, 18 banks will submit their one-year loan prime rates to the PBOC, which will publish an average after removing the highest and lowest quotes.It isn’t inconceivable that Chinese lenders, like their peers in the U.S. and Europe, would be tempted to collude and fix these rates to their advantage. But you need to have a market before you can manipulate it. In China, banks still don’t know how to price loans without hand-holding from the central bank. A case in point: Lenders in the developed world use market-driven benchmarks to determine their loan rates. Banks in Hong Kong, for instance, base mortgage rates on one-month Hibor, the city’s main interbank rate. In the U.S., loans with longer duration are priced against Treasuries of the same tenor. No such standards exist in China’s loan market. Some banks link their loan rates to Shanghai’s Libor equivalent; some to Chinese government-bond yields; and some to the savings deposit rates they offer. Still others equate their loan prime rates to the coupons of their own bonds, which means they don’t earn a penny from originating these loans. This dysfunction helps explain why the PBOC is asking these 18 banks to base their loan prime rates on their cost of borrowing from the central bank – China’s bank-loan market needs a pricing benchmark. It’s also understandable that the central bank is frustrated with the status quo. Lenders have enjoyed cheaper funding in recent months, as the PBOC has pumped liquidity into the system through open-market operations. Yet they haven’t passed lower borrowing costs on to clients: Many banks simply apply the central bank’s policy one-year lending rate of 4.35%, tag on a small discount of, say, 10%, and blindly offer this minimum loan rate.As a result, and much to the PBOC’s ire, interest rates for bank loans have held steady, despite a lower cost of borrowing in the bond and money markets. In its statement, the central bank warned against lenders setting “hidden floors” that would maintain lenders’ profit margins.Expanding the list of banks to 18 from 10 – and including regional and rural commercial banks – will also create extra work for the PBOC. Whereas the Big Four commercial banks can rely on China’s thrifty households for deposits, regional banks have to seek funding from the interbank market. Bank of Xi’an Co., for instance, gets more than a quarter of its funding from short-term loans in the interbank market, compared with roughly 10% for China Construction Bank Corp.This makes smaller banks’ access to funding much more volatile. If a lender such as Bank of Xi’an has a big repo loan due over the next week, wouldn’t its loan prime rate have to shoot higher? Bureaucrats at the PBOC will need to spend a good deal of time babysitting these small-town bankers – and teach them a thing or two about cash-flow management. While it’s laudable that the PBOC finally took the long-awaited step – six years, to be exact – in interest-rate reform, one can’t help wondering if China’s bank-loan market is ready. What we will end up seeing is a lot of window guidance. The PBOC can only wish that Chinese bankers are as clever as those in London.(Corrects the legend in the chart, which was reversed.)To contact the author of this story: Shuli Ren at sren38@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian markets. She previously wrote on markets for Barron's, following a career as an investment banker, and is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • HSBC Gets the Cold Shoulder in China
    Bloomberg

    HSBC Gets the Cold Shoulder in China

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s hard not to see HSBC Holdings Plc’s exclusion from China’s interest-rate reform as a snub.Hong Kong’s biggest bank wasn’t included in a list of 18 lenders that will participate in pricing for a new loan prime rate that the People’s Bank of China will start releasing Tuesday. The roster includes foreign lenders Standard Chartered Plc and Citigroup Inc., which have smaller China businesses than HSBC.It’s the latest sign that all may not be well in HSBC’s relations with Beijing, after a turbulent period that has seen the departures  this month of Chief Executive Officer John Flint and the bank’s Greater China head, Helen Wong. HSBC shares fell 13% in Hong Kong this year through last Friday, compared with a decline of less than 1% in the benchmark Hang Seng Index.London-based HSBC, which is also Europe’s biggest bank, has made China a key plank of its growth strategy. The lender is the third-largest corporate bank in the country by market penetration, according to data provider Greenwich Associates LLC. That places it ahead even of China Construction Bank  Corp. and Agricultural Bank of China Ltd., two of the nation’s big four state-owned lenders. Standard Chartered and Citigroup don’t rank among the top five, according Gaurav Arora, head of Asia Pacific at Greenwich.It could be argued that HSBC’s focus on big corporate clients means it’s less attuned to the loan market for small and medium-size enterprises that are the focus of China’s changes to its interest-rate regime. That would be a stretch, though. Corporate banking is a scale game. And even though StanChart may have a greater preponderance of smaller clients, HSBC surely has many similar customers. Citigroup’s inclusion makes more sense: It’s the only U.S. bank in China with a consumer-lending business that spans credit cards to SME loans. The list also includes less influential domestic lenders such as Bank of Xian Co. Those searching for reasons why HSBC may have fallen into China’s bad books may point to Huawei Technologies Co. Liu Xiaoming, China’s ambassador to the U.K., summoned Flint to the embassy earlier this year to interrogate him over the bank’s role in the arrest and prosecution of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei, the Financial Times reported Monday. The then-CEO told him HSBC had no option but to turn over information that helped U.S. prosecutors build a case against Meng, the FT said. On Aug. 9, an HSBC spokeswoman denied that Wong’s departure as Greater China head was linked to any issue involving Huawei, pointing out that she announced her resignation before Flint’s departure. Still, the bank has faced criticism in China’s state-owned media over its role in the case. The way HSBC helped the U.S. Department of Justice acquire documents concerning Huawei was unethical, the Global Times reported previously, citing a source close to the matter. The bank was likely to be included in China’s first “unreliable entity” list of companies that have jeopardized the interests of Chinese firms, it said.The timing of China’s interest-rate snub won’t do anything to quell jitters, coming a day after Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. CEO Rupert Hogg resigned amid criticism from Chinese regulators over its stance on employee participation in Hong Kong’s protests. Beijing is becoming more muscular in its attitude to the city’s unrest and foreign-owned businesses aren’t being spared. In an increasingly politicized environment, even a business that’s been around for 154 years will have to tread carefully. To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Some China Construction Bank (HKG:939) Shareholders Are Down 19%
    Simply Wall St.

    Some China Construction Bank (HKG:939) Shareholders Are Down 19%

    Investors can approximate the average market return by buying an index fund. While individual stocks can be big...

  • What Should Investors Know About The Future Of China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939)?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should Investors Know About The Future Of China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939)?

    Looking at China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939) earnings update in March 2019, analyst consensus outlook...

  • Moody's

    State Elite Global Limited -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of China Construction Bank Corporation

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of China Construction Bank Corporation and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers. This publication does not announce a credit rating action and is not an indication of whether or not a credit rating action is likely in the near future.

  • Reuters

    China April bank lending seen moderating, policy support still on track - Reuters poll

    New bank loans in China likely pulled back in April from strong levels the previous month, but may still outpace the historical trend as the central bank keeps up efforts to support cash-strapped smaller companies, a Reuters poll showed. Chinese banks are expected to have extended 1.2 trillion yuan (135.9 billion pounds) in net new yuan loans in April, falling from 1.69 trillion yuan in March but still ahead of 1.18 trillion yuan in the same month last year, a median estimate in a Reuters survey of 32 economists showed. Bank lending jumped 20 percent in the first quarter to a new record -- and there are some signs the economy is slowly responding -- but there are also concerns that a prolonged, heavy credit burst could fuel a further rise in bad loans as banks loosen lending standards.

  • Reuters

    China Big Five banks post modest profit growth amid loan push

    BEIJING/SINGAPORE (Reuters) - China's five biggest state-owned banks posted a modest growth in quarterly profit as policymakers pushed them to make more loans, but the results still missed expectations amid the lingering impact of an economic slowdown. Net profits at the country's so-called Big Five banks, led by Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd (ICBC), grew by more than 4 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier. The gain comes on the heels of disappointing 2018 fourth quarter when four of the five turned in their weakest profit growth in more than two years as business activity slowed and they sharply increased provisions for bad loans.

  • Investing.com

    China’s Four Largest Banks’ Bad Loans Hit Multi-Year Highs

    Investing.com - Bad loans at China's four largest lenders grew at the fastest pace since 2017 in the first quarter, Bloomberg reported citing financial statements.

  • Reuters

    China's big banks post modest first-quarter profit growth

    BEIJING/SINGAPORE(Reuters) - China's five largest state-owned banks posted modest first-quarter profit growth, though slightly below expectations, as policymakers pushed lenders to make more loans to support the slowing economy. Net profits at the country's so-called Big Five banks, led by Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd (ICBC), grew by more than 4 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier. The gain comes on the heels of disappointing 2018 fourth-quarter results that saw four of the five lenders posting their weakest quarterly profit growth in more than two years as business activity slowed and they sharply increased provisions for bad loans.

  • Reuters

    China Construction Bank posts 4.2 pct Q1 profit rise, misses estimates

    BEIJING/SINGAPORE, April 29 (Reuters) - China Construction Bank Ltd (CCB), the country's second-largest lender by assets, posted a lower than expected 4.2 percent increase in first-quarter profit as its ...

  • Reuters

    Malaysia's Proton to get $455 mln financing from China Construction Bank

    Malaysia's national carmaker Proton has secured 1.88 billion ringgit ($455.10 million) in banking facilities from China Construction Bank to fund expansion around the region, it said in a statement late Friday. The loans are earmarked for Proton's growth plans to be the number one automotive brand in Malaysia and number three in ASEAN by 2027, the company said. "Expansion to foreign markets is critical for sales growth while obtaining financing allows the company to invest in the many projects required to turn Proton into a truly global automotive brand," Chairman Syed Faisal Albar said in the statement.

  • At HK$7.01, Is China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939) Worth Looking At Closely?
    Simply Wall St.

    At HK$7.01, Is China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939) Worth Looking At Closely?

    China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939) saw significant share price movement during recent months on the SEHK, rising to highs of HK$7.18 and falling to the lows of HK$6.49...

  • What Are Analysts Saying About China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939) Earnings Trajectory?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Are Analysts Saying About China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939) Earnings Trajectory?

    Want to participate in a research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and earn a $60 gift card! The most recent earnings update China Construction Bank Corporation's (HKG:939) released in December 2018 indicated...

  • Reuters

    China's top banks warn of 'fragile' bad loans scenario as economy slows

    BEIJING/HONG KONG (Reuters) - China's top four state-controlled banks warned bad loans could rise and interest margins would shrink industry-wide, as three of them posted their weakest quarterly profit growth in more than two years. Top lender Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) reported flat net profit of 58.05 billion yuan ($8.63 billion) for the fourth quarter, the first time it has seen no growth in a quarter since the July-September 2016 quarter. Agricultural Bank of China Ltd (AgBank), the third-largest lender, also posted a drop of 5.4 percent on Friday in fourth-quarter net profit, its first quarterly decline since 2015.

  • Investing.com

    Asian Stocks Mixed; Brexit in Focus as May Vows to Resign if Deal is Passed

    Investing.com - Asian stocks were mixed in morning trade on Thursday. The Brexit saga continues to unfold as U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said she would resign if Parliament backs her Brexit deal.

  • Reuters

    China Construction Bank posts first quarterly profit drop since 2015

    * Profit at 40.55 bln yuan vs 43 bln yuan analyst view -Reuters calc * NPL 1.46 pct at December-end vs 1.47 pct three months prior * Net interest margin at 2.31 pct from 2.34 pct at September-end * (Adds ...

  • Reuters

    China Construction Bank's Q4 profit dips 1 pct, missing estimates

    SINGAPORE/HONG KONG, March 27 (Reuters) - China Construction Bank Corp (CCB) reported a 1 percent drop in fourth-quarter net profit on Wednesday, missing analysts' estimates. China's second-biggest lender ...

  • Reuters

    BRIEF-China Construction Bank's 2018 Net Profit Up 5.1 Pct

    March 27 (Reuters) - China Construction Bank Corp : * SAYS 2018 NET PROFIT UP 5.1 PERCENT Y/Y * SAYS NPL RATIO AT 1.46 PERCENT AT END 2018 * SAYS COMMON EQUITY TIER 1 RATIO AT 13.83 PERCENT AT END 2018 ...

  • What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939)?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939)?

    If you want to know who really controls China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share registry. Generally speaking, as a companyRead More...

  • Does China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939) Have A Place In Your Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does China Construction Bank Corporation (HKG:939) Have A Place In Your Portfolio?

    Want to participate in a short research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and you could win a $250 gift card! Over the past 10 years China ConstructionRead More...