0I50.IL - TRIP.COM GROUP LTD TRIP.COM GRO

IOB - IOB Delayed Price. Currency in USD
23.92
-0.07 (-0.27%)
As of 4:21PM GMT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close23.99
Open23.96
Bid22.19 x N/A
Ask24.65 x N/A
Day's Range23.92 - 24.21
52 Week Range21.77 - 38.75
Volume270
Avg. Volume6,369
Market CapN/A
Beta (5Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • Trip.com Group Limited Reports Unaudited Fourth Quarter and Full Year of 2019 Financial Results
    PR Newswire

    Trip.com Group Limited Reports Unaudited Fourth Quarter and Full Year of 2019 Financial Results

    Trip.com Group Limited (Nasdaq: TCOM) ("Trip.com Group" or the "Company"), a leading provider of online travel and related services, including accommodation reservation, transportation ticketing, packaged tours and in-destination services, corporate travel management, and other travel-related services, today announced its unaudited financial results for the fourth quarter and full year ended December 31, 2019.

  • Hedge Funds Were Dumping Trip.com Group Limited (TCOM) Before The Coronavirus
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Were Dumping Trip.com Group Limited (TCOM) Before The Coronavirus

    Coronavirus is probably the 1 concern in investors' minds right now. It should be. On February 27th we published an article with the title Recession is Imminent: We Need A Travel Ban NOW. We predicted that a US recession is imminent and US stocks will go down by at least 20% in the next 3-6 […]

  • Business Wire

    Avoiding the Bureaucracy Trap: Lessons From the Singapore Government--a Brief Version of James Liang's Op-Ed

    Owing to their wealth of resources, large organizations have a significant advantage in implementing large-scale projects. However, they are also burdened complicated and bloated workforces, which often lead to excessive bureaucratic red tape. Author: James Liang, Co-founder and Chairman of Trip.com Group Ltd. (Nasdaq: TCOM) * James Liang is an economist and entrepreneur. Trip.com Group Ltd. is one of largest OTAs in the world. The opinions expressed here are his own. Trip.com Group Ltd. was not involved in its creation.

  • Top Execs at China’s Largest Online Travel Site Forgo Salaries
    Bloomberg

    Top Execs at China’s Largest Online Travel Site Forgo Salaries

    (Bloomberg) -- Trip.com Group Ltd.’s top two executives will stop drawing salaries, part of a series of wage-cutting moves at China’s biggest online travel service provider to cope with the coronavirus outbreak.Chairman James Liang and Chief Executive Officer Jane Sun will no longer receive salaries beginning this month, and other members of the company’s top management will also voluntarily cut theirs by as much as half until the travel industry recovers, Sun wrote in an internal memo reviewed by Bloomberg News.Apart from front-line workers in the company’s service department, pay increases for other employees will also be suspended temporarily, the memo added.Trip.com, known domestically as Ctrip, is one of the largest players in an industry that’s been walloped by the global epidemic. The company, which provides everything from hotel and flight reservations to packaged tours and train ticketing, has seen demand plummet as Covid-19 spreads around the world and forces a cascade of travel advisories.In China, authorities and large employers have encouraged people to stay home. Shopping malls and restaurants are empty; amusement parks and theaters are closed; non-essential travel is all but forbidden. Last month, when the nation was the center of the outbreak, countries like U.S. and Japan warned citizens to avoid travel to China, further dampening demand for hotels and transportation. More recently, some Chinese cities have begun to restrict arrivals from overseas, as growing coronavirus outbreaks elsewhere prompt Beijing to enact curbs on inbound travel.“At present, the domestic epidemic situation is entering a relatively stable stage, but the prospects for the global epidemic situation is still unclear. While maintaining confidence in the future, we must also take a rational view and prepare for a long-term fight against the epidemic,” Sun’s memo said.Prior to the current public-health crisis, Trip.com’s business was also negatively impacted by the months-long pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong that severely curtailed visits to the city by mainland Chinese tourists.“This measure comes at a time when virus outbreak extends globally and makes it uncertain when to expect a recovery in the travel industry,” said SWS Research Co. analyst Mandy Jia. “But Trip.com is the No. 1 leader in the online travel agency industry. The virus crisis may shut down some smaller businesses and benefit the industry leader,” she said.\--With assistance from Natalie Lung.To contact the reporter on this story: Jinshan Hong in Hong Kong at jhong214@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rachel Chang at wchang98@bloomberg.net, Colum Murphy, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Coronavirus Got You Working From Home? Expect a Pain in the Neck

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The banging comes first, followed by the screaming. I could try to blot out the noise and carry on, but proximity to family is supposed to be one of the benefits of working from home. My one-year-old son knows there’s a computer keyboard on the other side of the door that needs a merry bashing with his tiny fists. I relent, as always, steering him toward an old desktop rather than my work laptop. He soon tires, and toddles off in search of fresh excitement.Like hundreds of other employees in Bloomberg’s Hong Kong bureau, I have been working from home for the past several weeks. How long exactly is hard to say, without checking. With no clear separation between the home and work, the hours and days blur into each other. There’s a constant sense of extended hiatus. Like the residents of Casablanca, we are waiting, waiting for that plane (or subway, rather) out of here and back to the office.For futurists, the business disruption wrought by the coronavirus is a dream come true. In 2014, a study by researchers at Stanford University challenged the notion that employees permitted to work from home might spend their time eating popcorn on the sofa and watching Netflix. On the contrary, they found that home working led to a 13% performance increase, while employees who volunteered for the nine-month trial reported improved work satisfaction and their attrition rate halved. The company in that case study, perhaps prophetically, was Chinese: Ctrip (now known as Trip.com Group Ltd.), a Shanghai-based and Nasdaq-listed travel agency then with 16,000 employees.Now the global spread of the coronavirus offers a far larger and wider natural experiment in the technical, logistical and human challenges of having large numbers of people work remotely. Companies from Twitter Inc. and HSBC Holdings Plc to Dentsu Group Inc. have advised, encouraged or required at least some staff to work from home. How well businesses function under these conditions could have a lasting impact on our approach to work.For me, the technical hurdles have been insignificant — trivial, to use a word beloved of techies — and nothing that Bloomberg’s technical support team couldn’t sort out relatively quickly. I have found the principal challenges to be physical and psychological.Hunching over a small laptop screen for a full 10-hour working day, for days on end, is an entirely different proposition than occasionally doing a bit of work from home on an evening or a weekend. After a while, I start to feel aches and pains in my neck and back. I didn’t fully appreciate how seamless and ergonomic my office set-up was until now.The most obvious solution would be to buy a standalone monitor and keyboard. So far, I have resisted this step, hoping that this will finally be the week that we get the call to return to the office. To invest in hardware would be to accept the semi-permanence of the situation. It would feel a little like buying a house in Casablanca.So instead I take frequent breaks and remind myself to pay attention to my posture, lest I end up like another foreign journalist I know, who told me he’d ended up partially paralyzed after spending two years covering a major story on a laptop from a hotel room in Shanghai. In 2006, while based in Shanghai, I started taking lessons in the Alexander Technique after an episode of severe back pain. I credit that training in body consciousness with keeping me free from any serious problems since then. Would I be in worse shape now without that awareness? Quite possibly.The size of Hong Kong apartments compounds the physical and mental challenges. Working at home, I tend to move less than I would in the office, where the trip to the coffee machine or the meeting room requires a journey of at least a few hundred meters. My apartment is bigger than average, at just under 800 square feet (74 square meters), but it takes me only a few seconds to walk from one end to the other.There have been days at a time when I haven’t gone out, having no desire to expose myself to any more risk of infection than necessary. This has left me feeling a little detached and fuzzy on occasion.I’ve realized how much I relied on the daily, small social contacts the office provided. Journalists can be strange animals: often lone wolves, whose job is nevertheless to insert themselves into the affairs of other people. Maybe we need that contact more than many of us would readily admit. While our team holds a video conference call every morning, my gut feeling is that working from home isn’t good for team building. There is no substitute for face-to-face contact, though how much is necessary is an elastic question.One friend at a bank in Hong Kong is working alternate days in the office. That’s a neat way of thinning out the number of desk-based employees and cutting down the risk of infection. Perhaps that could become a permanent model for some companies. I could be persuaded.Now, the good news: just as I was finishing up this column, we got word that we should be able to return to the office next week. And if you’ll excuse me, I have to get back to my popcorn. Casablanca’s on, and I always did love that film.To contact the author of this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sarah Green Carmichael at sgreencarmic@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Matthew Brooker is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. He previously was a columnist, editor and bureau chief for Bloomberg News. Before joining Bloomberg, he worked for the South China Morning Post. He is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trip.com Group Reschedules the Announcement Date of its Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Financial Results to March 18, 2020
    PR Newswire

    Trip.com Group Reschedules the Announcement Date of its Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Financial Results to March 18, 2020

    Trip.com Group Limited (Nasdaq: TCOM) ("Trip.com Group" or the "Company"), a leading provider of online travel and related services, including accommodation reservation, transportation ticketing, packaged tours and in-destination services, corporate travel management, and other travel-related services, today announced that it has rescheduled the announcement date for its financial results for the fourth quarter and full year 2019 to after the U.S. market closes on March 18, 2020.

  • Trip.com Seeks $1.2 Billion Loan in Funding Test Amid Outbreak
    Bloomberg

    Trip.com Seeks $1.2 Billion Loan in Funding Test Amid Outbreak

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.Trip.com Group Ltd., China’s biggest online travel service provider, is seeking to raise a $1.2 billion loan in a test of investor risk appetite as the leisure industry reels from the coronavirus outbreak.The company is in talks with international and Chinese lenders for the facility, according to people familiar with the matter. The loan is for refinancing and working capital, said the people who are not authorized to speak publicly and asked not to be identified. Trip.com declined to comment in an emailed statement.The loan comes amid challenges to its business following the new coronavirus that has claimed over 1,300 lives. More than 50 countries or territories have imposed travel restrictions and tightened visa requirements to contain the spread of the disease, according to the International Air Transport Association.Trip.com’s last loan was in July 2019 when it signed a $2 billion three-year facility, according to Bloomberg-compiled data.\--With assistance from Lulu Yilun Chen.To contact the reporter on this story: Apple Lam in Hong Kong at alam271@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chan Tien Hin at thchan@bloomberg.net, Finbarr FlynnFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airbnb Extends Beijing Suspension to May to Fight Virus Outbreak
    Bloomberg

    Airbnb Extends Beijing Suspension to May to Fight Virus Outbreak

    (Bloomberg) -- Airbnb Inc. has extended a freeze on all Beijing business by two months, heeding tightened local regulations aimed at curbing the coronavirus epidemic.It’s now suspending check-ins at all of its listings in the Chinese capital until April 30, instead of the end of February, the San Francisco-based company said in a messaged statement. The U.S. startup has offered refunds to those affected or that cancel their bookings.Airbnb counts on China’s growing middle class to deliver a large portion of its future growth. Health authorities there are trying to gauge whether the world’s largest known quarantine effort has been effective in containing the pneumonia-causing virus in central Hubei province, a landlocked region of 60 million people. But infections are rising elsewhere in the country, and Beijing is one of its most popular tourist destinations.It’s not yet clear whether others in the home-sharing industry, including Trip.com Group Ltd.-backed Tujia, will follow suit. Xiaozhu said this week it will shut down all rentals in Beijing for February and issue full refunds for existing bookings while also waiving landlord commission fees. In its mobile app, Trip.com said “some” apartment bookings in Beijing for the month have been suspended and recommended users turn to hotels instead.“In accordance with the guidance from local authorities for the short term rental industry during this public health emergency, bookings of all listings in Beijing with check-in from 7 February 2020 to 30 April 2020 have been suspended,” Airbnb said in its statement Wednesday. “This measure is based on official guidance that applies to all companies in the short term rental industry operating in Beijing.”Read more: Airbnb Freezes Beijing Check-Ins Till March to Curb VirusTo contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.net;Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Vlad SavovFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Alibaba’s China Disconnect Cuts Hong Kong Dead

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The decision to exclude shares of China's biggest e-commerce company from a cross-border trading link is a blow to Hong Kong. Is it a punishment, or simple self-interest at work? The answer matters, both for the city’s exchange and for Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.Alibaba can’t be included in the stock connect program linking Hong Kong with the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges at present, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. China’s securities regulator has yet to agree to rule changes proposed by Hong Kong Stock Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. that would allow the internet company to participate, one of the people was cited as saying.Granted, the Jack Ma-founded internet giant doesn’t qualify under the stock connect program’s existing arrangements, which exclude companies that have secondary listings with weighted voting rights. These were already in place before New York-listed Alibaba raised $13 billion selling shares in Hong Kong late last year.But exceptions have already been made. In October, China allowed companies with dual-class shares to join the connect, giving investors in the mainland access to Hong Kong-listed technology companies Xiaomi Corp. and Meituan Dianping. Rules can be changed when there is the desire to do so.Clearly, that was the expectation among investors here. The notice on dual-class shares was posted by the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges in mid-October and took effect Oct. 28. Three days later, Alibaba was reported to be planning its secondary listing in Hong Kong the following month. The shares started trading Nov. 26.Investors in Alibaba’s Hong Kong stock will have a right to feel short-changed if the shares lose steam as a result. They dropped as much as 2.5% after the Bloomberg News story published, before recovering to close little changed. Alibaba has rallied more than 20% since its debut in Hong Kong, at least partly on anticipation that the stock will draw a wall of money from mainland Chinese investors who wouldn’t otherwise be able to buy.The lack of support for Alibaba to join the stock connect is a severe blow to Hong Kong’s aspirations of marketing itself as the offshore listing venue of choice for Chinese technology companies, in an environment where the U.S. has become increasingly inhospitable and businesses are considering their options. Trip.com Group Ltd. and Netease Inc. are among U.S.-listed Chinese enterprises that are said to be looking at listing in Hong Kong. Bankers have talked of pitching other names including JD.com Inc. and Baidu Inc.The prospect of acquiring an enthusiastic mainland investor base that would help to buoy valuations is a key selling point for those who might be tempted to decamp from a U.S. exchange. If Alibaba — a marquee name with a $578 billion market capitalization — can’t get the nod, what’s the hope for any of the others?More worrying for Hong Kong is what the reluctance may say about China’s support for the city, as it contemplates the hit to its own economy from the coronavirus epidemic. HKEX, after all, is a competitor as well as a partner with the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges. If Hong Kong becomes too attractive a venue for China’s leading companies, that may hold back development of the mainland’s markets.In 2018, Hong Kong relaxed its listing rules to admit unprofitable technology companies, competing with the U.S. and making the exchange even more alluring to Chinese hopefuls than the Shanghai and Shenzhen markets. In turn, Shanghai introduced the tech-focused Star Board in July, a Chinese answer to the Nasdaq that accepts money-losing companies with weighted voting rights. After a lively start, the board’s performance has been underwhelming. It has drawn few big names and has thin turnover.All may not be lost. Smartphone maker Xiaomi had been public in Hong Kong for 15 months before it joined the connect, while food-delivery app Meituan had to wait 13 months. HKEX and Alibaba will have to hope this is the slow arm of bureaucracy rather than the cold shoulder. To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Will Be the Blowback From China to Countries That Banned Its Travelers During Virus Outbreak?
    Skift

    What Will Be the Blowback From China to Countries That Banned Its Travelers During Virus Outbreak?

    "Chinese tourists will once again be one of the most welcome groups of guests while academic and commercial partnerships between China and the world will become even closer. The choices made by governments in the face of the coronavirus emergency may very well determine their prospects for cooperation with China in the future." So wrote […]

  • Airbnb Freezes Beijing Check-Ins Until March to Curb Coronavirus
    Bloomberg

    Airbnb Freezes Beijing Check-Ins Until March to Curb Coronavirus

    (Bloomberg) -- Airbnb Inc. is suspending check-ins at all of its Beijing listings until March to comply with local regulations intended to curb the coronavirus outbreak that’s spreading across China.The San Francisco-based company said in a statement that it will offer refunds to all those affected or that cancel their bookings. This is in adherence to municipal policy, Airbnb said, though the Beijing government’s press office didn’t answer calls from Bloomberg News seeking comment.Local rival Xiaozhu will match Airbnb’s actions, shutting down all rentals in Beijing for February and issuing full refunds for existing bookings while also waiving landlord commission fees, it said in a statement. It’s not yet clear whether others in the home-sharing industry, including Trip.com Group Ltd.-backed Tujia, are following suit. In its mobile app, Trip.com said “some” apartment bookings in Beijing have been suspended and recommended users turn to hotels instead.“In light of the novel coronavirus outbreak and guidance from local authorities for the short-term rental industry during this public health emergency, bookings of all listings in Beijing with check-in from 7 February 2020 to 29 February 2020 have been suspended,” Airbnb said in its statement. The company “appreciates that disease control efforts are causing overall travel disruptions that also affect our community of guests and hosts.”Read more: Airbnb Hosts in Coronavirus Epicenter Stay Open for Business (1)Health authorities in China and around the world are trying to gauge whether the world’s largest known quarantine effort has been effective in containing the pneumonia-causing virus in central Hubei province, a landlocked region of 60 million people. Infections are rising elsewhere in the country and Beijing is one of its most popular tourist destinations. As of Sunday, Beijing’s health authorities have confirmed 337 cases, including two deaths.Read more: Coronavirus May Infect up to 500,000 in Wuhan Before It Peaks(Updates with Xiaozhu suspension plan in third paragraph)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.net;Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Vlad SavovFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investopedia

    Short sellers are buying positions in Chinese stocks amid coronavirus

    This figure from S3 Partners includes shorting of ETF shares worth $62 million and equities worth $275 million. The top China-centric ETFs being targeted by short sellers include the ISHS MSCI China ETF (MCHI), ISHS China Large Cap ETF (FXI), Kraneshs CSI China Internet Fund ETF (KWEB) and SPDR S&P China ETF (GXC). Travel restrictions are in place throughout China's major cities and health screenings are increasing at major airports in Asia and Europe.

  • It’s Hard to Pull Off 3 Billion Trips During a Pandemic
    Bloomberg

    It’s Hard to Pull Off 3 Billion Trips During a Pandemic

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There’s never a good time for the outbreak of a deadly virus, but this one is particularly bad. China’s Lunar New Year is often dubbed the world’s largest migration, a stretch of weeks when hundreds of millions of people visit their families. Before the pandemic started spreading, officials were expecting 3 billion airplane and train trips during the holiday rush between Jan. 10 and Feb. 18. Millions more have gone abroad.Little wonder, then, that the travel industry is suffering. With the death toll up to 25 and more than 800 infected, tourists are staying home. Some have no choice: The government has put seven cities on lockdown and airports are stepping up screening measures. On Friday, China ordered all travel agencies to suspend sales of domestic and international tours.Shares of China Southern Airlines Co. – the carrier most exposed to the site of the outbreak – have slid 14% since the second death from the virus was confirmed, while Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., which said it would waive fees for tickets to and from the mainland, has slumped 7.6%. The country’s largest online travel agency, Trip.com Group Ltd. has tumbled 12%.If the SARS outbreak of 2003 is any guide, things could get even worse. In May of that year, Chinese air passenger traffic fell 71%, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Bernstein Research cited concerns of a repeat outcome when it cut Trip.com’s rating one notch to “market perform” earlier this week. The Nasdaq-listed company, which changed its name from Ctrip.com last year, issued a statement Thursday saying it would refund travelers who’ve been diagnosed, or those in close touch with them.The hope is that, like SARS, the turbulence will eventually pass. For Trip.com, however, the business challenges are bigger than the coronavirus. In recent years, the company has struggled to keep up with competition from digital rivals like Meituan Dianping and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.Few travel companies have benefited more from China’s transition to the world’s biggest source of tourists in 2012. Despite the trade war and Hong Kong’s protests,(3) China’s outbound tourism numbers have continued to rise. According to Euromonitor International, 108.39 million overseas trips were taken last year, a 9.5% gain, after surging 11.7% in 2018. Trip.com now makes up a quarter of its total sales from outbound Chinese visitors, from under 15% five years ago, reckons Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Vey-Sern Ling.But the hotel-booking sector is getting crowded. Meituan Dianping has recently overtaken Trip.com as China’s top site, just five years after the food-delivery giant started dabbling in the business. Meituan now has 47% of China's market, ahead of Trip.com, with 34%, according to TrustData. Now, Meituan is moving further into Trip.com’s territory with luxury hotels, while chains like Marriott International Inc. are pushing for direct booking on their China websites. Alibaba said part of the $13 billion it raised from its Hong Kong listing in November would go toward fliggy.com, its online travel group site.If there’s any lesson to be gleaned from all this, it’s the benefit of diversification. While China’s superapp business model has arched some eyebrows (how can one company possibly provide digital payments, taxis, food delivery, massages and pet grooming?) there’s a decent case to be made for having some crisis-proof subsidiaries. Consider AirAsia Group Bhd, Southeast Asia's most successful budget airline, which is setting up a regional fast food franchise.Plans could already be underway for Trip.com to diversify its investor base, with the company discussing plans to go public in Hong Kong, Bloomberg News reported earlier this month. Here, Alibaba is a successful model. With its second listing, the company is now closer to its Chinese end-users, and Alibaba’s New York-listed stock has soared 14%.The four-month span of the SARS outbreak shows how quickly things can turn around: While China’s growth dipped in the second quarter of 2003, it swiftly resumed in the following months. Given how much more important the Chinese shopper is to the economy now, the damage could be more painful. A 10% fall in discretionary transportation and entertainment could shave 1.2 percentage points from China’s growth domestic product, according to “back of the envelope” estimates by S&P Global Inc. Hong Kong retailers and restaurants, just coming off the pain of last year's protests, were already suffering. For those companies that enjoyed the fast-rising Chinese consumer, it may be time to devise a plan B. (Updates to include China’s measures to suspend travel-agency sales.)(1) Hong Kong, followed by Macau, are the top two destinations of mainland Chinese travelers.To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend
    Bloomberg

    Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Hong Kong is missing an opportunity to displace the U.S. as an offshore listing venue for Chinese companies by keeping trading fees too high. Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s $11 billion offering in November showed the potential for the city’s stock exchange to attract U.S.-listed mainland enterprises amid an unsettled trade relationship between the two largest economies. Relatively expensive costs threaten to undermine that appeal.Investors get more for their dollar when they trade on the New York Stock Exchange. In Hong Kong, bid-ask spreads are wider and minimum investment requirements are higher. That increases the chance of so-called slippage, when there is a difference between the expected price of a trade and the level at which it is actually executed. With zero stamp duty and lower minimum trade requirements, the NYSE has a more favorable environment for active investors.Alibaba’s Hong Kong trading volume has slumped since the internet giant made its debut on the local exchange. On Nov. 26, shares valued at the equivalent of about $1.79 billion changed hands. Since mid-December, that figure has dropped to a daily average of about $322 million. The Hong Kong listing has made no dent in Alibaba’s stock trading in New York, where volume has averaged $3.2 billion since late November.To be sure, trading costs are by no means the only factor — or even the main one — in deciding where to buy and sell. To begin with, the U.S. is a more deep and liquid market. It has other advantages, including a more active and developed options market that gives traders more ways to hedge or speculate on stocks. That said, Hong Kong could do a better job of rolling out the welcome mat.Since losing out to New York for Alibaba’s record $25 billion initial public offering in 2014, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. has made a number of rule changes to enhance its viability as a platform for technology startups from China and elsewhere. In April 2018, the exchange amended its provisions to admit companies with dual-class shares. Smartphone maker Xiaomi Corp.  and internet services company Meituan Dianping listed soon after, demonstrating that when HKEX makes smart decisions, the exchange benefits.More U.S.-traded Chinese companies are looking at Hong Kong for potential secondary listings. They include travel services provider Trip.com Group Ltd., formerly known as Ctrip; game and website operator Netease Inc.; web search provider Baidu Inc.; and e-commerce giant JD.com Inc. The way is open for Hong Kong to create a new offshore ecosystem for U.S.-listed Chinese companies seeking better positioning for the mainland while hedging their bets against a renewed deterioration in the U.S.-China relationship after the phase one agreement was signed this month.It makes little sense to squander this opportunity by maintaining trading costs that are a major barrier to entry. The Hong Kong government and the exchange must work together to make dual listing opportunities both beneficial and attractive to companies while encouraging investors to trade here. However, HKEX regulators seem to have their heads in the sand when it comes to reducing fees and the minimum buy-in to entice more companies. That may be a reflection of its monopoly status: Unlike the NYSE, which must compete with Nasdaq, HKEX has no local rival.Reducing fees would lower the barrier to entry for active investors and increase trading volume. As I wrote in September, cutting stamp duty would help improve liquidity and make Hong Kong stocks more attractive to retail and institutional investors. The ripple effect from this would further strengthen Hong Kong’s position as a global financial center. It’s time for the government and exchange to look beyond the immediate impact of reduced revenue and consider the long term.  To contact the author of this story: Ronald W. Chan at chartwellhk@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ronald W. Chan is the founder and CIO of Chartwell Capital in Hong Kong. He is the author of “The Value Investors” and “Behind the Berkshire Hathaway Curtain.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trip.com Group Ltd. to Report Fourth Quarter of 2019 Financial Results on February 26, 2020 U.S. Time
    PR Newswire

    Trip.com Group Ltd. to Report Fourth Quarter of 2019 Financial Results on February 26, 2020 U.S. Time

    Trip.com Group Ltd. (Nasdaq: TCOM), a leading one-stop travel service provider of accommodation reservation, transportation ticketing, packaged tours and corporate travel management, will announce its fourth quarter of 2019 results on Wednesday, February 26, 2020, U.S. Time, after the market closes.

  • Intrepid Partners With Ctrip to Popularize Green Trips in China
    Skift

    Intrepid Partners With Ctrip to Popularize Green Trips in China

    Intrepid Group is making its biggest push ever for a slice of China’s outbound market by partnering Trip.com Group to offer sustainable travel to Chinese travelers. Just a few years ago trips that are purposeful, responsible, experiential — and other such sustainablespeak that defines Intrepid journeys — might be largely met with puzzlement in China. […]

  • Hong Kong Bourse Discusses New Listings With Ctrip, Netease
    Bloomberg

    Hong Kong Bourse Discusses New Listings With Ctrip, Netease

    (Bloomberg) -- Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. is discussing secondary listings with Chinese technology companies including Trip.com Group Ltd. and Netease Inc. after Alibaba raised $13 billion in its 2019 share offering in the city, according to people familiar with the matter.Bourse officials have held follow-up talks with the two U.S.-listed firms about the possibility of a secondary share sale, the people said, requesting not to be named because the matter is private. The discussions are preliminary and subject to change, they added.Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. has said it’s seeing a spike in inquiries about secondary listings from Chinese firms. The interest comes at a time when U.S. scrutiny of Chinese companies has intensified. A decision to proceed would see China’s biggest online travel service provider and second-biggest gaming company -- with a combined market value of about $60 billion -- follow in the footsteps of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., which last year pulled off the financial hub’s largest equity offering since 2010.Hong Kong Exchanges’ shares rose 2.9% Thursday, their biggest gain in nearly four months. Trip.com, known also as Ctrip, climbed 10.2% to mark its biggest rise since March. And Netease stock surged 7.2%, the most since August, helped by a rally in Chinese technology stocks listed in New York.Read more: China Tech Inc. Straps in for Turbulence After a Wild 2019Ctrip and the Hong Kong exchange declined to comment in emailed statements. A Netease representative had no comment when contacted.Alibaba’s share sale marked a triumph for Asia’s largest stock exchange operator, which has lost many of China’s brightest technology stars to U.S. rivals. The city’s bourse introduced new rules to allow dual-class shares after initially resisting such a change, a move that had prompted Alibaba’s decision to debut in New York in 2014.More secondary listings from technology companies would bolster the Hong Kong exchange, which posted its worst profit drop in almost three years in the September quarter. The financial hub has also been shaken by months of anti-government protests, casting uncertainty over its 2020 prospects.Total fundraising from Hong Kong initial public offerings will drop by as much as 27% in 2020 to HK$230 billion ($29.5 billion), PwC estimated on Thursday. About 180 companies may debut, with more “new economy enterprises” to seek listings thanks to rule reforms.“More U.S.-listed Chinese concept stocks will come back to Hong Kong in 2020,” Benson Wong, a partner at PwC, said at a press briefing in Hong Kong. That trend will persist beyond next year, though it will be harder to see offerings on Alibaba’s scale, he added.Why Now, and Why Hong Kong, for Alibaba’s Share Sale?: QuickTakeA secondary offering in Hong Kong would help Chinese tech companies hedge their risks as U.S. tensions simmer. The Donald Trump administration is stepping up scrutiny against Chinese technology players beyond Huawei Technologies Co. Lawmakers have called for curbs on U.S. pension fund investments in the country’s companies.It could also help raise capital to tide them over an economic slowdown and increasing competitive pressure in 2020. Ctrip in particular has about $700 million worth of convertible bonds due in July. Its shares are trading at about $33.50, 38% below the agreed convertible price of $54, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.New tech debutantes like Alibaba will get a boost if they’re added to the benchmark Hang Seng Index and a stock connect program that allows mainland investors to buy shares in Hong Kong. Hang Seng Indexes Co. plans a consultation in the first quarter to discuss a raft of issues, including whether firms with weighted voting rights, like Alibaba, should be eligible for the HSI. Members of the stock connect program require reviews by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, the stock market watchdog.Read more: Alibaba’s Hong Kong Rally Is At Risk From Three Misconceptions(Updates with Ctrip and Netease gains in the fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Kiuyan Wong and Zheping Huang.To contact the reporter on this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Candice Zachariahs at czachariahs2@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China’s Tech Industry Straps in for More Turbulence After a Wild 2019
    Bloomberg

    China’s Tech Industry Straps in for More Turbulence After a Wild 2019

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s tech industry enters a new year after weathering unprecedented turbulence in 2019, when giants emerged in social media and artificial intelligence only to bear the brunt of Washington’s campaign to contain the world’s No. 2 economy. There’s little reason to think 2020 will be much different given U.S. efforts to hobble Chinese champions from Huawei Technologies Co. to SenseTime Group Ltd. deemed a threat to national security.American lawmakers went after some of the country’s biggest names last year. Foremost among them were smartphone and networking titan Huawei and ByteDance Inc., the Chinese wunderkind that in the span of a few years overturned social media entertainment and drew a billion-plus mostly younger U.S. users to its online video app TikTok. The heightened scrutiny came just as pressure back home intensified.Beijing sought to scrub sensitive content from ByteDance apps and Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat, while the economy grew at its slowest pace in decades, depressing Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s e-commerce business. Investors cooled on the sector with venture capital activity halving -- triggering fears the industry’s heyday is over. That in turn demoralized the country’s already-overworked tech professionals, who rebelled for the first time against the 70-plus hour workweeks that Alibaba-founder Jack Ma labeled the norm.Given Washington’s increasing hostility, China is now even more driven to devise alternatives to foreign technology from AI chips to blockchain solutions while propping up local champions: bad news for the likes of Qualcomm Inc. and Apple Inc. that depend on China for much of their revenue. It’s started to upend a decades-old supply chain centered around China, threatening to split the old world order in two. It’s not just in hardware -- from Russia to Southeast Asia, many governments have begun to co-opt characteristics of the Chinese internet arena, from harsh fake-news laws to censorship and data sovereignty.“This year was perhaps the first year we understand China tech at its most global ever. But it also showed us the specter of it becoming more and more insular,” said Michael Norris, research and strategy manager at Shanghai-based consultancy AgencyChina. “This is bigger than just the U.S., in terms of about assuaging the fears of countries like India that (Chinese) platforms aren’t going to disseminate nude photographs or hate speech.”Here’s what happened:A Capital WinterThe industry’s woes may be best quantified by a plunge in capital flow. The amount of venture money invested plummeted by more than 50% to about $50 billion from a record $112 billion in 2018, when it topped the U.S., according to the market research firm Preqin. VC funding dropped in the U.S. too, but only slightly. China birthed only 15 unicorns, or startups worth at least $1 billion, down from 35 the year before, according to CB Insights.The plummet coincided with a loss of confidence in some of the industry’s marquee names, exemplified by the rocky debuts of WeWork and Uber Technologies Inc. While Alibaba raised $13 billion in a milestone Hong Kong offering, smaller names like SenseTime and Full Truck Alliance struggled to raise capital. “The power of the mobile revolution is coming to an end. Globally, we are seeking what comes next,” said Kai-Fu Lee, founder of Sinovation Ventures.The startup and VC industry is likely headed for a shakeout. Many investments from the past bubbly years aren’t panning out, with startups struggling to live up to their valuations. Fundraising by China-focused venture firms fell by about 50% to about $13 billion, according to Preqin.One option for capital-raising may be the Alibaba route, selling shares via a secondary listing in Hong Kong. The city’s exchange is discussing that possibility with Chinese companies including Trip.com Group Ltd. and Netease Inc., according to people familiar with the matter.Huawei: Down But Not OutThe year kicked off with Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou under home arrest in Vancouver, fighting extradition to the U.S. Then the Trump administration tightened its grip on China’s largest tech company in May, banning Huawei from buying some components and software from American tech giants including Intel Corp. and Google. Throughout 2019, Washington pushed allies to pass on purchasing Huawei-made fifth-generation telecom gear, accusing the company of aiding Chinese espionage. Huawei’s disputed such claims but that didn’t stop Japan, Australia and New Zealand from blocking Huawei from 5G projects.The most immediate repercussions lie with its smartphone business. New Huawei models introduced on overseas markets will be devoid of must-have Android apps like Google Maps and Gmail. In response, Huawei stepped up efforts to become more self-reliant, mobilizing its 190,000 employees to develop in-house alternatives and unveiling a potential Android surrogate dubbed Harmony OS.The tumult forced reclusive Huawei billionaire founder Ren Zhengfei into the media spotlight to defend his company, lash out at the U.S. and expound on his company’s efforts to lead the coming 5G revolution. Huawei may have survived the first wave but it’s likely that the real pain will come in 2020.Stars Are BornChina’s tech boom over the past decade birthed twin giants Alibaba and Tencent, a duo that effectively controls almost every aspect of the country’s internet through their sprawling business empires and vast investment portfolios. But from 2019, a new generation of tech darlings rose to the fore and now challenge their forebears.Foremost among them is ByteDance, the world’s most valuable startup. After its first breakout hit, news app Toutiao, the Chinese company is rocking youths the world over with TikTok, an app known for everything from teenage twerking to singing gummy bears. It’s been downloaded about 1.45 billion times since launching, but has become a lightning rod for criticism as tensions rise between the U.S and China. From Facebook Inc. chief Mark Zuckerberg to a growing coterie of lawmakers, prominent Americans warn that user data may wind up in Chinese government hands. ByteDance has repeatedly denied that could happen.The year will see ByteDance try to extend its tentacles into a panoply of fields. It’s testing a paid music app in emerging markets to challenge the likes of Apple Music and Spotify. It’s looking to make video games to tackle Tencent on its home turf. Other rising contenders include Tencent-backed super app Meituan and AI leader SenseTime.Meituan, which displaced Baidu Inc. as China’s third most valuable tech firm last year, will continue to battle Alibaba in nascent areas from food delivery to online travel. For SenseTime and fellow domestic AI pioneers such as Megvii Technology Ltd., the challenge will be grappling with U.S. sanctions that threaten to crimp their fledgling businesses.“China tech is going global, going mainstream and shaking things up more than ever,” said Rebecca Fannin, founder of technology consultancy Silicon Dragon. “More U.S. startups will follow China business models.”Dismantling the Old World OrderChina’s position as factory for the world of technology is in jeopardy. The (mainly Taiwanese) assemblers of the world’s electronics are exploring options beyond China to varying degrees. From Inventec Corp. to Foxconn Technology Group and Quanta Computer Inc., the makers of everything from iPhones to Dell laptops have either moved production back to Taiwan or to further-flung regions around Asia, seeking to escape U.S. tariffs. The idea is that, even if Washington and Beijing strike a trade deal, diversification is essential in the longer term given tensions are unlikely to subside and labor costs will rise.Even leading Chinese hardware suppliers recognize the risks. Luxshare Precision Industry Co. has invested in Vietnam and established a unit in India, while Goertek Inc. has begun making Apple’s popular AirPods earbuds in Vietnam. Taken together, the collective exodus spells the start of the end of a system that’s served the world’s leading electronics brands well since the 1980s.Workers’ Woes MountLast year forced Chinese tech workers to come to terms with the new reality. Many had taken jobs with startups in the hope of cashing in when they debut or get bought. But as that deal-making streak cooled, the prospect of working long hours -- 996, or 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week -- lost much of its appeal. In March, Chinese programmers on GitHub put together a list of companies known for short-changing their employees on overtime. That post spurred a greater awareness of the human cost of China’s tech boom. In December, Huawei drew widespread condemnation when a former employee who had been detained for 251 days after the company reported him to police for alleged extortion was released without charge.One thing’s clear: the Chinese tech arena, long regarded as an alternate reality to a U.S. app-dominated world, will draw further away from its American counterpart. And some of its biggest players will seek to extend their influence overseas, as they’ve done from Africa to Southeast Asia.“What’s changed is the trade war, the talk of decoupling,” said Paul Triolo, head of global technology policy at Eurasia Group. “This has really galvanized the authorities. It doesn’t necessarily mean that they will be more successful. But they’re determined.”(Updates with Hong Kong listings in the ninth paragraph)\--With assistance from Edwin Chan and Lulu Yilun Chen.To contact the reporters on this story: Colum Murphy in Beijing at cmurphy270@bloomberg.net;Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.net;Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.net;Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Ctrip.com International, Ltd. to Report Second Quarter of 2019 Financial Results on September 9, 2019 U.S. Time
    PR Newswire

    Ctrip.com International, Ltd. to Report Second Quarter of 2019 Financial Results on September 9, 2019 U.S. Time

    SHANGHAI , Aug 2, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Ctrip.com International, Ltd. (Nasdaq: CTRP), a leading travel service provider of accommodation reservation, transportation ticketing, packaged tours and corporate ...

  • PR Newswire

    Ctrip Reports Unaudited Fourth Quarter and Full Year of 2018 Financial Results

    SHANGHAI , March 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Ctrip.com International, Ltd. (Nasdaq: CTRP), a leading travel service provider of accommodation reservation, transportation ticketing, packaged tours and corporate ...