2317.TW - Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd.

Taiwan - Taiwan Delayed Price. Currency in TWD
80.60
+1.30 (+1.64%)
At close: 1:30PM CST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close79.30
Open79.50
Bid80.50 x 0
Ask80.60 x 0
Day's Range79.40 - 80.80
52 Week Range67.00 - 107.50
Volume38,127,000
Avg. Volume36,121,434
Market Cap1.117T
Beta (3Y Monthly)2.01
PE Ratio (TTM)10.49
EPS (TTM)7.68
Earnings DateAug 12, 2019 - Aug 16, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield4.00 (5.04%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-25
1y Target Est88.95
  • Bloomberg6 days ago

    Foxconn Billionaire Terry Gou Denies Ever Considering Solo Run to Lead Taiwan

    (Bloomberg) -- Billionaire Foxconn founder Terry Gou never considered an independent run for Taiwan’s presidency, a spokeswoman for the electronics tycoon said, after Gou lost the nomination to lead the island’s opposition party into January’s election.Speculation that Gou will leave the Kuomintang to pursue leadership of Taiwan is a “fake issue,” his spokeswoman Amanda Liu said in a text message on Tuesday. Gou’s response comes one day after Han Kuo-yu, the firebrand mayor of the southern port city of Kaohsiung, overcame Gou and three other candidates in the party’s presidential primary.Liu declined to elaborate further when asked if Gou still intended to seek Taiwan’s presidency in another capacity, leaving the door open to speculation that the tech tycoon -- who in June quit as chairman of Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Foxconn’s main listed arm -- would find another way to run in the election. A solo bid by Gou could have a significant impact on the outcome, likely siphoning votes from the KMT as it tries to unseat incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen.Shares of Hon Hai climbed as much as 2.8% to their highest in about two months as investors expect Gou to focus more on the company.Power BrokerThe 68-year-old is a major power broker in the global electronics industry, with unusually strong ties to both the U.S. and China. He built Foxconn Technology Group from a maker of television knobs into a global powerhouse that is now Apple’s largest supplier and China’s largest private employer, with as many as 1 million mostly migrant workers assembling everything from iPhones to Dell desktop computers.Earlier: China-Friendly Mayor Tops Foxconn’s Gou to Vie for Taiwan LeaderGou also has ties to U.S. President Donald Trump, agreeing to build a 13,000-worker facility in the state of Wisconsin in exchange for more than $4.5 billion in government incentives.Hailed by Trump as “one of the great deals ever,” the project has since been criticized for low-paying jobs and sudden dismissals. Foxconn says the plant is on track to begin producing LCDs next year.\--With assistance from Miaojung Lin and Adela Lin.To contact the reporters on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.net;Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times7 days ago

    Populist mayor seals victory in Taiwan presidential primaries

    Taiwan’s main opposition party, Kuomintang, is set to nominate China-friendly Han Kuo-yu as its presidential candidate after the populist mayor defeated Foxconn founder Terry Gou in the party’s primaries by a wide margin. Mr Han’s decisive victory will pit him against the incumbent Tsai Ing-wen in next January’s elections against a backdrop of rising tensions with China. The result could benefit Ms Tsai as it creates the risk of a split in the KMT, with Mr Gou — whose company is one of Apple’s largest suppliers — considering running as an independent candidate.

  • After Math: Flipping the Switch
    Engadget8 days ago

    After Math: Flipping the Switch

    Facebook's poker playing AI turned the tables on some Texas Hold'em pros, Foxconn pulled the old switcheroo on the state of Wisconsin, and Luminar's new LiDAR is poised to turn the autonomous vehicle market on its ear. When Foxconn and the Wisconsin state government agreed to open a production facility in the home of the Cheeseheads, the addition of 13,000 jobs was supposed to come with the new buildings.

  • Apple's India-made top-end iPhones to hit stores next month: source
    Reuters11 days ago

    Apple's India-made top-end iPhones to hit stores next month: source

    Apple Inc's top-end iPhones, assembled in India by Foxconn's local unit, are likely to hit Indian stores next month, a source said, potentially helping the tech giant drop prices in the world's second-biggest smartphone market. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Foxconn said it does not comment on customers or their products.

  • Foxconn's Wisconsin plant opens next May with fewer jobs than promised
    Engadget11 days ago

    Foxconn's Wisconsin plant opens next May with fewer jobs than promised

    Foxconn's long-promised factory in Wisconsin will finally begin production inMay 2020, but to start, it's only creating 1,500 jobs

  • South China Morning Post18 days ago

    Taiwan tech firms set to join exodus from China amid trade war, says Citibank research

    A 25 per cent tariff will largely wipe out cost advantages of Taiwanese tech firms on the mainland, accelerating their exodus from China and lead to as many three million job losses, a Citibank study predicted on Thursday."Taiwan firms' exports account for at least 10 per cent of total Chinese exports, and 37 Taiwanese firms operating in China are in the top 100 exporters' list to US," the report said, adding that because of rapidly rising wages and other costs, labour intensive industries have already moved out of China.Citibank was recently judged by FinanceAsia as the best international bank in Taiwan.The Trump administration has imposed 25 per cent tariffs on US$250 billion of Chinese exports since the trade war started more than a year ago.Foxconn has said that it could move electronics production bound for the US market out of the mainland. Photo: Bloomberg alt=Foxconn has said that it could move electronics production bound for the US market out of the mainland. Photo: BloombergAccording to a research report by China International Capital Corp (CICC), mainland-listed companies that make computers and electronics products will be the second most affected by the additional 15 per cent tariffs that were imposed in May.The tariffs on their exports to the US will account for 18.7 per cent of their total profit in 2018, CICC said.According to Citibank analysts' estimates, based on disclosures from China's Ministry of Commerce from September 2017, Taiwanese firms employ some 10 million people on the mainland, with 60 per cent of them in the information and communication technology (ICT) industry, and their cumulative investment stands at more than US$66 billion.An outbound investment survey by Taiwan's Ministry of Economic Affairs found that 95 per cent of the employees hired by Taiwanese companies in China were in the manufacturing industry, with the share of ICT " electronic components, devices, optical products and personal computers " at 59 per cent."Assuming 30 to 50 per cent of them leave China, we estimate 1.77 million to 2.95 million job losses could take place over a couple of years," the Citibank report said.Citibank's estimates matched a poll conducted by accounting firm PwC in March. The study showed that about 40 per cent of Taiwanese firms planned to adjust their supply chain. Google denies link to China's military over touch-screen tools that may help PLAThe year-long US-China trade war has hastened the relocation of firms from not only Taiwan, but also Europe, South Korea and the US to countries in Southeast Asia. If they have not already moved, they are seriously considering diversifying their production base.In mid-June, Foxconn, which assembles iPhones in China, said the company could move electronics production for the US market out of the mainland at short notice. Reports said that the assembly of iPhones could start in India within this year.Richard Hsieh, a Taiwanese entrepreneur running a software firm in east China's Jiangsu province, said that as the advantages of cheap labour, land and electricity evens out in China, it makes economic sense for Taiwanese ICT firms to shift production elsewhere. US-China trade tensions will weigh on global economy"Many hi-tech OEMs [original equipment manufacturer) were targeted in the recent rounds of tariffs. They are the ones who were hit most heavily by the trade war," Hsieh said, adding that a supply chain reshuffle cannot happen overnight.Jason Chan, another Taiwanese businessman who runs an artificial intelligence firm in Beijing, however said he did not feel the need to shake up his supply chain."Trump can target anyone. Imagine you have just moved your factory to Vietnam and the next day Trump says he was going to impose tariffs on Vietnam," he said. "So I think compared to relocation, making good use of re-exports is more practical."Citibank analysts observed that the Chinese government, noting the exit of Taiwanese firms from the mainland, has offered them a slew of incentives, which will help to stabilise exports, employment and the economy.Taiwanese firms can take part in "Made in China 2025", enjoy favourable tax policy, and have the same rights as domestic firms participating in major national research and development projects, infrastructure projects and government backed procurement schemes."These efforts could potentially slow Taiwan firms' exodus from China, but we believe these measures may not be sufficient enough to offset the impact of tariff war," the report said.This article originally appeared in the South China Morning Post (SCMP), the most authoritative voice reporting on China and Asia for more than a century. For more SCMP stories, please explore the SCMP app or visit the SCMP's Facebook and Twitter pages. Copyright © 2019 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. Copyright (c) 2019. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Global Tech Is Weaker Than It Looks
    Bloomberg27 days ago

    Global Tech Is Weaker Than It Looks

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Ten months ago, I warned that storm clouds were brewing over the global technology industry. The situation today is much worse.Back then, a U.S.-China trade war was more risk than reality, Apple Inc.’s pending iPhone update held promise, and central banks were still in tightening mode. Yet inventories at the end of June 2018 had climbed to the highest since the financial crisis a decade earlier and a sector-wide slowdown was looming.At the time, the Pollyannas were louder than the Chicken Littles. The next iPhone had yet to launch and Christmas shopping season was coming, argued the optimists.Since then, global technology companies have issued loud warnings about lost sales due to U.S. actions against Huawei Technologies Inc. In short, because the U.S. is restricting what can be sold to the Chinese giant, the company and its suppliers are cutting orders. This is causing a ripple effect from semiconductor materials supplier IQE Plc to chip designer Broadcom Inc.But there’s something you need to know about the Huawei effect: It isn’t the cause of this technology recession. If anything, the company is the reason why the situation didn’t worsen earlier. The U.S. war on Huawei propped up the tech sector, notably semiconductors, over the past year.Let me explain. Immediately after the Trump administration in May blacklisted Huawei from buying U.S. components, Bloomberg News reported that the maker of telecommunications equipment and smartphones had been been stockpiling components in anticipation of some kind of action. Chairman Ren Zhengfei saw his own storm brewing and started saving for the rainy day that came on May 17.This tells us that some proportion of global component demand over the past year wasn’t led by end-product sales, but merely by shelf-stocking. More significantly, what revenue component makers did see was probably a false signal, pointing to demand that didn’t exist.These suspicions were confirmed earlier this month when Mark Liu, chairman of made-to-order chipmaker Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., told me that he wasn’t sure how much of his company's recent revenue had gone to supplying Huawei’s end-product demand versus building the Chinese company’s inventory. Almost every technology company is a client of TSMC. If Liu, who has the broadest and deepest picture of the global tech sector, can’t make out the difference between demand and inventory build, then you can be sure he’s not alone.There’s also solid data to show the scale of Huawei’s stockpiling. Total inventories climbed 33% last year. Its stash of components – measured as raw materials and works in progress – jumped 76%. At even its most optimistic, there’s no way that Huawei expected 76% revenue growth this year.Which brings us back to the sector as a whole.Here’s an update of the numbers compiled 10 months ago, based on nine leading technology hardware companies and charted by my colleague Elaine He. The results aren’t heartening:With few exceptions, inventories – measured in dollar terms or days outstanding – climbed since June 30, 2018, and were unequivocally higher than two years ago. The revenue slowdowns that have affected every corner of the hardware sector this year make this buildup ominous.Of even greater concern are data pointing to prolonged cash conversion cycles, a measure of how long companies take to turn manufactured goods into money. The only firm to see a solid dip is Apple, and that’s because it tends to generate revenue from customers before having to pay suppliers. Both TSMC and iPhone assembler Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. (aka Foxconn) have said they hold inventory on their books for their key client. Were it not for that fact, Apple’s rising inventory days outstanding would probably be even higher.A major reason for Hon Hai posting weak earnings in the first quarter was inventory provisions. Those can be reversed if products sitting on shelves get sold to consumers, Hon Hai CFO David Huang told me this month. But shipping an already-made device to meet demand means you don’t need to manufacture a new phone, which in turn means no need to buy components from suppliers, and so forth.That’s the situation we’re in now: plenty of inventory, false signals from the Huawei effect, and a pending global economic slowdown that’s likely to suppress demand. If that doesn’t make make you worry about the state of global technology hardware, then I applaud your optimism. To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Foxconn’s Billionaire Founder Urges Apple to Invest in Taiwan
    Bloomberglast month

    Foxconn’s Billionaire Founder Urges Apple to Invest in Taiwan

    (Bloomberg) -- The billionaire founder of Apple Inc.’s largest supplier asked the U.S. company to move from China to neighboring Taiwan."Speaking from the perspective of the Republic of China, I will plead to Apple to come to Taiwan," said Terry Gou, who remains the largest shareholder in Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., answering a question about whether Apple will shift production away from China. He was referring to Taiwan by its formal moniker. “I believe it is possible," he said without elaborating.Louis Woo, a special assistant to Gou, later said that the executive and Taiwan presidential hopeful was urging Apple to "invest" in Taiwan, not to move plants from China.The Trump administration’s threat to levy tariffs on some $300 billion of Chinese-made goods -- including phones and laptops -- has inflamed speculation that Apple will divert some capacity away from the world’s second largest economy. And Hon Hai is the largest of hundreds of Apple-suppliers with factories on the mainland, making most of the world’s iPhones from the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou.A significant shift of manufacturing from China to Taiwan -- which Beijing views as part of its territory -- may also exacerbate tensions between the two governments. Hon Hai, the main listed arm of the Foxconn Technology Group, is today the largest private employer in China, paying as many as a million mostly migrant laborers to put together everything from iPhones to HP laptops.Gou, who is stepping down as Hon Hai chairman Friday to focus on winning a party nomination to compete in the 2020 Taiwanese presidential elections, had run a company that depends on Apple for half its revenue. It’s unclear how much capacity Gou may have been referring to, nor how feasible a large-scale move -- for Hon Hai or any other Apple supplier -- may be.The Taiwanese firms that assemble most of the world’s electronics are now expanding or exploring plants in Southeast Asia and elsewhere to escape punitive tariffs on U.S.-bound goods. But the vast majority of their capabilities remain rooted in China. The Nikkei reported this week that Apple asked its largest suppliers to consider the costs of shifting 15% to 30% of its output from China to Southeast Asia, but three major partners to the U.S. company later pushed back against that idea. Hon Hai itself has said Apple hasn’t requested such a move.(Updates with comment from Gou special assistant in third paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TheStreet.comlast month

    Foxconn's Future Shows How Taiwan Gains from China's Pain

    Taiwan stands to gain on two fronts due to China's worsening headaches: the commercial, and the political. The trade war has hurt Taiwan's exports in the short haul, but over the long haul will benefit its manufacturing sector in particular. Meanwhile, the ongoing demonstrations in Hong Kong over the erosion of "One Country, Two Systems" have made it very clear ahead of a presidential election next year that Taiwan should not under any circumstances accept China's offer of the same scheme.

  • iPhone Maker Hon Hai Names New Chairman to Replace Terry Gou
    Bloomberglast month

    iPhone Maker Hon Hai Names New Chairman to Replace Terry Gou

    (Bloomberg) -- Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., the largest assembler of Apple Inc.’s iPhones, has named Young Liu its new chairman to replace billionaire founder Terry Gou.Hon Hai said the semiconductor division chief’s appointment takes effect July 1, taking up a post vacated by Gou. The Taiwanese billionaire, who built the company from a maker of TV knobs into a global consumer electronics powerhouse, is stepping down to focus on winning a party nomination to compete in the 2020 Taiwanese presidential elections. Hon Hai’s shares slid more than 1%.Liu takes the helm at a precarious time for the world’s largest contract manufacturer, known also as Foxconn. Escalating U.S.-Chinese tensions are hurting consumer sentiment and raising fears about the impact on Foxconn’s plants, most of which are located in the world’s No. 2 economy. Washington is threatening to hit Beijing with new tariffs on about $300 billion worth of Chinese goods including phones and laptops -- directly affecting Hon Hai’s business with Apple and the world’s biggest electronics brands. And Beijing has shown a growing willingness to retaliate against American names.Gou had long been expected to step back from Foxconn’s day-to-day operations to focus on his political endeavors. He remains a board member and largest shareholder, but formally handed the baton over on Friday during the company’s annual general meeting in Taipei.“I have very complicated feelings,” Liu told reporters after the meeting wrapped. “I will work to maximize the shareholders’ interest.”Read a live blog of Hon Hai’s Friday AGM here(Updates with effective date from the second paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Terry Gou resigns as Foxconn's chairman to run for president of Taiwan
    TechCrunchlast month

    Terry Gou resigns as Foxconn's chairman to run for president of Taiwan

    Terry Gou said at Foxconn’s annual general meeting today that he is leavingthe electronics manufacturing giant as he prepares to run for president ofTaiwan

  • Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency
    Reuterslast month

    Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency

    Apple Inc supplier Foxconn chose chip-unit boss Liu Young-way as chairman on Friday to succeed Terry Gou, who is preparing to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. Liu was tipped to take over from Gou, who told Reuters in April that he planned to step down to pave the way for younger talent to move up the ranks of the world's biggest electronics contract manufacturer. Earlier on Friday, Gou told the company's annual general meeting (AGM) in Taipei he will hand over the running of the company to a newly formed nine-member operations committee.

  • Reuterslast month

    Foxconn elects chip unit head as chairman, replacing Gou

    TAIPEI, June 21 (Reuters) - Taiwan's Foxconn said on Friday it named as chairman Liu Young-Way, the current boss of its chip unit, replacing Terry Gou. Earlier in the day, founder Gou stepped aside, handing over the running of the world's largest electronics contract manufacturer to a new operations committee as he prepares to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. (Reporting by Yimou Lee in Singapore; Editing by Himani Sarkar)

  • Reuterslast month

    UPDATE 4-Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency

    Apple Inc supplier Foxconn chose chip-unit boss Liu Young-way as chairman on Friday to succeed Terry Gou, who is preparing to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. Liu was tipped to take over from Gou, who told Reuters in April that he planned to step down to pave the way for younger talent to move up the ranks of the world's biggest electronics contract manufacturer. Earlier on Friday, Gou told the company's annual general meeting (AGM) in Taipei he will hand over the running of the company to a newly formed nine-member operations committee.

  • Why Foxconn's founder wants Apple to move plants out of China
    Yahoo Finance Videolast month

    Why Foxconn's founder wants Apple to move plants out of China

    Foxconn’s founder Terry Gou wants Apple to move some production out of China and invest in Taiwan, according to Bloomberg. Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith & Dan Howley discuss on "The Ticker."

  • How serious is Foxconn's push to move Apple production out of China?
    Yahoo Finance Videolast month

    How serious is Foxconn's push to move Apple production out of China?

    Yahoo Finance's Dan Howley reports on Foxconn officials urging Apple to move production out of China. Julie Hyman, Adam Shapiro, Brian Cheung, and Jared Blikre further discuss.

  • FoxConn founder suggests Apple moves production out of China
    Yahoo Finance Videolast month

    FoxConn founder suggests Apple moves production out of China

    Terry Gou, the founder of Foxconn is urging Apple to move plants from China to Tawain. It's important to note, Gou has since resigned from Foxconn and is running for president of Taiwan. Yahoo Finance's Akiko Fujita, Kristin Myers and Heidi Chung discuss.