2317.TW - Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd.

Taiwan - Taiwan Delayed Price. Currency in TWD
76.30
-0.10 (-0.13%)
At close: 1:30PM CST
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Previous Close76.40
Open76.10
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range76.10 - 76.70
52 Week Range67.00 - 107.50
Volume17,408,000
Avg. Volume44,875,763
Market Cap1.058T
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.98
PE Ratio (TTM)9.93
EPS (TTM)7.68
Earnings DateAug 12, 2019 - Aug 16, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield2.50 (3.27%)
Ex-Dividend Date2018-07-25
1y Target Est88.95
  • Global Tech Is Weaker Than It Looks
    Bloombergyesterday

    Global Tech Is Weaker Than It Looks

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Ten months ago, I warned that storm clouds were brewing over the global technology industry. The situation today is much worse.Back then, a U.S.-China trade war was more risk than reality, Apple Inc.’s pending iPhone update held promise, and central banks were still in tightening mode. Yet inventories at the end of June 2018 had climbed to the highest since the financial crisis a decade earlier and a sector-wide slowdown was looming.At the time, the Pollyannas were louder than the Chicken Littles. The next iPhone had yet to launch and Christmas shopping season was coming, argued the optimists.Since then, global technology companies have issued loud warnings about lost sales due to U.S. actions against Huawei Technologies Inc. In short, because the U.S. is restricting what can be sold to the Chinese giant, the company and its suppliers are cutting orders. This is causing a ripple effect from semiconductor materials supplier IQE Plc to chip designer Broadcom Inc.But there’s something you need to know about the Huawei effect: It isn’t the cause of this technology recession. If anything, the company is the reason why the situation didn’t worsen earlier. The U.S. war on Huawei propped up the tech sector, notably semiconductors, over the past year.Let me explain. Immediately after the Trump administration in May blacklisted Huawei from buying U.S. components, Bloomberg News reported that the maker of telecommunications equipment and smartphones had been been stockpiling components in anticipation of some kind of action. Chairman Ren Zhengfei saw his own storm brewing and started saving for the rainy day that came on May 17.This tells us that some proportion of global component demand over the past year wasn’t led by end-product sales, but merely by shelf-stocking. More significantly, what revenue component makers did see was probably a false signal, pointing to demand that didn’t exist.These suspicions were confirmed earlier this month when Mark Liu, chairman of made-to-order chipmaker Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., told me that he wasn’t sure how much of his company's recent revenue had gone to supplying Huawei’s end-product demand versus building the Chinese company’s inventory. Almost every technology company is a client of TSMC. If Liu, who has the broadest and deepest picture of the global tech sector, can’t make out the difference between demand and inventory build, then you can be sure he’s not alone.There’s also solid data to show the scale of Huawei’s stockpiling. Total inventories climbed 33% last year. Its stash of components – measured as raw materials and works in progress – jumped 76%. At even its most optimistic, there’s no way that Huawei expected 76% revenue growth this year.Which brings us back to the sector as a whole.Here’s an update of the numbers compiled 10 months ago, based on nine leading technology hardware companies and charted by my colleague Elaine He. The results aren’t heartening:With few exceptions, inventories – measured in dollar terms or days outstanding – climbed since June 30, 2018, and were unequivocally higher than two years ago. The revenue slowdowns that have affected every corner of the hardware sector this year make this buildup ominous.Of even greater concern are data pointing to prolonged cash conversion cycles, a measure of how long companies take to turn manufactured goods into money. The only firm to see a solid dip is Apple, and that’s because it tends to generate revenue from customers before having to pay suppliers. Both TSMC and iPhone assembler Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. (aka Foxconn) have said they hold inventory on their books for their key client. Were it not for that fact, Apple’s rising inventory days outstanding would probably be even higher.A major reason for Hon Hai posting weak earnings in the first quarter was inventory provisions. Those can be reversed if products sitting on shelves get sold to consumers, Hon Hai CFO David Huang told me this month. But shipping an already-made device to meet demand means you don’t need to manufacture a new phone, which in turn means no need to buy components from suppliers, and so forth.That’s the situation we’re in now: plenty of inventory, false signals from the Huawei effect, and a pending global economic slowdown that’s likely to suppress demand. If that doesn’t make make you worry about the state of global technology hardware, then I applaud your optimism. To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Foxconn’s Billionaire Founder Urges Apple to Invest in Taiwan
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Foxconn’s Billionaire Founder Urges Apple to Invest in Taiwan

    (Bloomberg) -- The billionaire founder of Apple Inc.’s largest supplier asked the U.S. company to move from China to neighboring Taiwan."Speaking from the perspective of the Republic of China, I will plead to Apple to come to Taiwan," said Terry Gou, who remains the largest shareholder in Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., answering a question about whether Apple will shift production away from China. He was referring to Taiwan by its formal moniker. “I believe it is possible," he said without elaborating.Louis Woo, a special assistant to Gou, later said that the executive and Taiwan presidential hopeful was urging Apple to "invest" in Taiwan, not to move plants from China.The Trump administration’s threat to levy tariffs on some $300 billion of Chinese-made goods -- including phones and laptops -- has inflamed speculation that Apple will divert some capacity away from the world’s second largest economy. And Hon Hai is the largest of hundreds of Apple-suppliers with factories on the mainland, making most of the world’s iPhones from the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou.A significant shift of manufacturing from China to Taiwan -- which Beijing views as part of its territory -- may also exacerbate tensions between the two governments. Hon Hai, the main listed arm of the Foxconn Technology Group, is today the largest private employer in China, paying as many as a million mostly migrant laborers to put together everything from iPhones to HP laptops.Gou, who is stepping down as Hon Hai chairman Friday to focus on winning a party nomination to compete in the 2020 Taiwanese presidential elections, had run a company that depends on Apple for half its revenue. It’s unclear how much capacity Gou may have been referring to, nor how feasible a large-scale move -- for Hon Hai or any other Apple supplier -- may be.The Taiwanese firms that assemble most of the world’s electronics are now expanding or exploring plants in Southeast Asia and elsewhere to escape punitive tariffs on U.S.-bound goods. But the vast majority of their capabilities remain rooted in China. The Nikkei reported this week that Apple asked its largest suppliers to consider the costs of shifting 15% to 30% of its output from China to Southeast Asia, but three major partners to the U.S. company later pushed back against that idea. Hon Hai itself has said Apple hasn’t requested such a move.(Updates with comment from Gou special assistant in third paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TheStreet.com5 days ago

    Foxconn's Future Shows How Taiwan Gains from China's Pain

    Taiwan stands to gain on two fronts due to China's worsening headaches: the commercial, and the political. The trade war has hurt Taiwan's exports in the short haul, but over the long haul will benefit its manufacturing sector in particular. Meanwhile, the ongoing demonstrations in Hong Kong over the erosion of "One Country, Two Systems" have made it very clear ahead of a presidential election next year that Taiwan should not under any circumstances accept China's offer of the same scheme.

  • Financial Times5 days ago

    Foxconn: in Liu of Apple

    The new chairman of Apple supplier Hon Hai, also known as Foxconn, arrives at a tough time . US-China trade tension is still rising and iPhone sales in China are falling. Liu Young-way, former head of ...

  • Financial Times5 days ago

    Foxconn chooses semiconductor head to succeed Terry Gou as chair

    Key Apple supplier Foxconn on Friday picked Liu Young-way, the head of the group’s semiconductor arm, to succeed Terry Gou as chairman as the founder wants to run for president of Taiwan.  The board of ...

  • iPhone Maker Hon Hai Names New Chairman to Replace Terry Gou
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    iPhone Maker Hon Hai Names New Chairman to Replace Terry Gou

    (Bloomberg) -- Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., the largest assembler of Apple Inc.’s iPhones, has named Young Liu its new chairman to replace billionaire founder Terry Gou.Hon Hai said the semiconductor division chief’s appointment takes effect July 1, taking up a post vacated by Gou. The Taiwanese billionaire, who built the company from a maker of TV knobs into a global consumer electronics powerhouse, is stepping down to focus on winning a party nomination to compete in the 2020 Taiwanese presidential elections. Hon Hai’s shares slid more than 1%.Liu takes the helm at a precarious time for the world’s largest contract manufacturer, known also as Foxconn. Escalating U.S.-Chinese tensions are hurting consumer sentiment and raising fears about the impact on Foxconn’s plants, most of which are located in the world’s No. 2 economy. Washington is threatening to hit Beijing with new tariffs on about $300 billion worth of Chinese goods including phones and laptops -- directly affecting Hon Hai’s business with Apple and the world’s biggest electronics brands. And Beijing has shown a growing willingness to retaliate against American names.Gou had long been expected to step back from Foxconn’s day-to-day operations to focus on his political endeavors. He remains a board member and largest shareholder, but formally handed the baton over on Friday during the company’s annual general meeting in Taipei.“I have very complicated feelings,” Liu told reporters after the meeting wrapped. “I will work to maximize the shareholders’ interest.”Read a live blog of Hon Hai’s Friday AGM here(Updates with effective date from the second paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Terry Gou resigns as Foxconn's chairman to run for president of Taiwan
    TechCrunch5 days ago

    Terry Gou resigns as Foxconn's chairman to run for president of Taiwan

    Terry Gou said at Foxconn’s annual general meeting today that he is leavingthe electronics manufacturing giant as he prepares to run for president ofTaiwan

  • Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency
    Reuters5 days ago

    Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency

    Apple Inc supplier Foxconn chose chip-unit boss Liu Young-way as chairman on Friday to succeed Terry Gou, who is preparing to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. Liu was tipped to take over from Gou, who told Reuters in April that he planned to step down to pave the way for younger talent to move up the ranks of the world's biggest electronics contract manufacturer. Earlier on Friday, Gou told the company's annual general meeting (AGM) in Taipei he will hand over the running of the company to a newly formed nine-member operations committee.

  • Financial Times5 days ago

    Foxconn selects new chairman to replace founder Terry Gou 

    Key Apple supplier Foxconn Technology Group has chosen Young Liu, the head of its semiconductor unit, to succeed founder Terry Gou as chairman.  The board of Hon Hai Precision, the Taiwan-listed flagship ...

  • Reuters5 days ago

    Foxconn elects chip unit head as chairman, replacing Gou

    TAIPEI, June 21 (Reuters) - Taiwan's Foxconn said on Friday it named as chairman Liu Young-Way, the current boss of its chip unit, replacing Terry Gou. Earlier in the day, founder Gou stepped aside, handing over the running of the world's largest electronics contract manufacturer to a new operations committee as he prepares to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. (Reporting by Yimou Lee in Singapore; Editing by Himani Sarkar)

  • Reuters5 days ago

    UPDATE 4-Foxconn picks chip-unit head for chairman, as Gou seeks Taiwan presidency

    Apple Inc supplier Foxconn chose chip-unit boss Liu Young-way as chairman on Friday to succeed Terry Gou, who is preparing to contest Taiwan's presidential elections next year. Liu was tipped to take over from Gou, who told Reuters in April that he planned to step down to pave the way for younger talent to move up the ranks of the world's biggest electronics contract manufacturer. Earlier on Friday, Gou told the company's annual general meeting (AGM) in Taipei he will hand over the running of the company to a newly formed nine-member operations committee.

  • Foxconn Game of Thrones Looms as Its King Abdicates
    Bloomberg7 days ago

    Foxconn Game of Thrones Looms as Its King Abdicates

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- On June 11, for the first time in history, Foxconn Technology Group held an investor relations conference for its flagship company.That’s the good news. The bad news is what the moment portends: The world’s largest electronics manufacturer is about to be left without a CEO.It took founder Terry Gou’s pending departure from Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. to face its stakeholders beyond the legally mandated annual shareholders’ meeting. Gou didn’t even bother to turn up, choosing instead to continue his campaign to become Taiwan’s president.After’s Gou’s departure, which could be as soon as Friday, Foxconn will have a new chairman, and the CEO role will be replaced by a committee of nine. For the past 45 years Gou has been the sole decider and face of the company. So while this major shift in leadership brings sudden and long-overdue transparency, it also leaves his sprawling company – which spans more than a dozen nations, up to one million workers, and an all-star client list – in the hands of a committee and without a chief.I’ve long been skeptical about the company and its future, with or without Gou. As the global tech industry faces both a macroeconomic slowdown and the fallout from U.S.-China trade tensions, Foxconn finds itself caught in the crossfire.The comportment of the company’s new management now allays some of those concerns. At the investor event and a telephone conference that followed, these executives – many of whom had rarely spoken publicly – succinctly fielded questions about the challenges of running Foxconn in the age of President Donald Trump, the possibility of moving iPhone production out of China, and the company’s need to transform. That’s a refreshing change from the waffling, disjointed answers Gou usually gives to the media.Still, this doesn’t mean everything is sorted. The debate over Foxconn’s next chairman, which has been raging for more than a decade, continues. Group CFO Huang Chiu-lian, known as Money Mama, was among the names tipped to take control. Heads of various divisions are also being considered.It’s my belief that Young Liu, currently head of Foxconn’s chip division, will get that job. (Huang isn’t in the running since she won’t be on the new board). Getting the chairmanship, though, doesn’t mean taking Foxconn’s Iron Throne. Rather, this management-by-committee strategy sets the company up for possible infighting among various division chiefs, some of whom are part of that inner circle.Any executive decision inevitably becomes a question of resource allocation. Since Foxconn is notoriously tight-fisted, divisions will likely need to compete with each other or engage in back-room horse trading to get what they want.If the collegiality on display at the new team’s first public outing dissolves, then the executive lineup is likely to become a war of attrition. When Gou floated the idea of retirement a dozen years ago, he talked about winnowing his list down from more than 35 to less than 10 possible successors. But he’s never groomed anyone, unlike compatriot Morris Chang, who spent considerable time training up his successors for the company he founded and chaired, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. More than a few people who follow Foxconn have told me they think that most lieutenants will retire pretty quickly if they don’t get clear control over the company once Gou steps down. As some depart, competition to take the reins may ensue. My fear is that a series of departures and jostling will weaken Foxconn just when it needs stability and a single leader. Once that shakes out, any eventual winner may find that there’s no throne to take, let alone dragons to fight with.To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters7 days ago

    RPT-UPDATE 1-Apple explores moving 15-30% of production capacity from China - Nikkei

    Apple Inc has asked its major suppliers to assess the cost implications of moving 15%-30% of their production capacity from China to Southeast Asia as it prepares for a restructuring of its supply chain, according to a Nikkei Asian Review report on Wednesday. Apple's request was a result of the extended Sino-U.S. trade dispute, but a trade resolution will not lead to a change in the company's decision, Nikkei said https://s.nikkei.com/31zCGhw, citing multiple sources. The iPhone maker has decided the risks of depending heavily on manufacturing in China are too great and even rising, it said.

  • Apple Wants Suppliers to Mull Major Shift From China: Nikkei
    Bloomberg7 days ago

    Apple Wants Suppliers to Mull Major Shift From China: Nikkei

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a coming daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Apple Inc. has asked its largest suppliers to consider the costs of shifting 15% to 30% of its output from China to Southeast Asia in a dramatic shake-up of its production chain, the Nikkei reported.The U.S. tech giant asked “major suppliers” to evaluate the feasibility of such a migration, the newspaper cited multiple sources as saying. Those included iPhone assemblers Foxconn Technology Group, Pegatron Corp. and Wistron Corp., MacBook maker Quanta Computer Inc., iPad maker Compal Electronics Inc. and AirPod makers Inventec Corp., Luxshare-ICT and GoerTek Inc., Nikkei cited them as saying.China is a crucial cog in Apple’s business, the origin of most of its iPhones and iPads as well as its largest international market. But President Donald Trump has threatened Beijing with new tariffs on about $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, an act that would escalate tensions while levying a punitive tax on Apple’s most profitable product. Company spokeswoman Wei Gu didn’t respond to a request for comment.Two major Apple suppliers pushed back against the Nikkei report. The U.S. company has not asked for cost estimates for shifting production out of the world’s No. 2 economy, although suppliers are running the numbers on their own given the trade dispute, said one person familiar with the matter, asking not to be identified discussing internal deliberations. Another supplier said it too had not gotten such a request from Apple and that the Cupertino, California-based company had resisted a proposed production shift to Southeast Asia.Apple does have a backup plan if the U.S.-China trade war gets out of hand: Primary manufacturing partner Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. has said it has enough capacity to make all U.S.-bound iPhones outside of China if necessary, Bloomberg News reported last week.The Taiwanese contract manufacturer now makes most of the smartphones in the Chinese mainland and is the country’s largest private employer. Hon Hai, known also as Foxconn, has said Apple has not given instructions to move production but it is capable of moving lines elsewhere according to customers’ needs.Apple hasn’t set a deadline for the suppliers to finalize their business proposals, but is working together with them to consider alternative locations, the Nikkei said. Any move would be a long-term process, it cited its sources as saying.Beyond Apple’s partners, the army of Taiwanese companies that make most of the world’s electronics are reconsidering a reliance on the world’s second-largest economy as Washington-Beijing tensions simmer and massive tariffs threaten to wipe out their margins. That in turn is threatening a well-oiled, decades-old supply chain.Taiwan’s largest corporations form a crucial link in the global tech industry, assembling devices from sprawling Chinese production bases that the likes of HP Inc. and Dell then slap their labels on. That may start to change if tariffs escalate, an outcome now in the balance as Washington and Beijing spar over a trade deal.Apple is an outsized figure in that negotiation. The high-end iPhone, which accounted for more than 60% of the company’s 2018 revenue, drives millions of jobs across China as well as a plethora of different industries from retail to electronics. The country is also a major consumer market in its own right, yielding nearly 20% of last year’s revenue -- weakness there pushed Apple to cut its sales forecast in January.“Twenty-five percent of our production capacity is outside of China and we can help Apple respond to its needs in the U.S. market,” Hon Hai board nominee and semiconductor division chief Young Liu told an investor briefing in Taipei last week. “We have enough capacity to meet Apple’s demand.”(Updates with a source’s comments from the second parapraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Debby Wu in Taipei at dwu278@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple explores moving 15-30% of production capacity from China - Nikkei
    Reuters7 days ago

    Apple explores moving 15-30% of production capacity from China - Nikkei

    Apple's request was a result of the extended Sino-U.S. trade dispute, but a trade resolution will not lead to a change in the company's decision, Nikkei said https://s.nikkei.com/31zCGhw, citing multiple sources. The iPhone maker has decided the risks of depending heavily on manufacturing in China are too great and even rising, it said. Earlier this month, credit rating agency Fitch said it views Apple, Dell Technologies Inc and HP Inc as potential blacklist candidates if China blacklists U.S. companies in retaliation for restrictions on Huawei.

  • Tariffs are forcing Big Tech to move production out of China
    Engadget14 days ago

    Tariffs are forcing Big Tech to move production out of China

    In response to the Trump administration's trade war with China, major techcompanies are preparing to relocate key manufacturing operations

  • Your IPhone Is Already Made in America
    Bloomberg14 days ago

    Your IPhone Is Already Made in America

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It wouldn’t take much for Apple Inc. to have U.S.-sold iPhones made outside China.Foxconn Technology Group, the primary assembler of the devices, said Tuesday that it has enough capacity to make all iPhones bound for the U.S. outside of China if necessary. Apple hasn’t given the Taiwanese company such instructions, a senior executive of Foxconn’s listed flagship Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. said. The question for Foxconn, Apple’s leadership, the U.S. administration and everyone else, though, is: What does “made” actually mean? This isn’t an esoteric question. As the technology and trade war escalates, billions of dollars hang on the answer.That it’s feasible to avoid a “Made in China” label appears to have come as a revelation to many.Let me give you an analogy: Chef A designs a croissant recipe, sources and measures the ingredients, mixes the flour, sugar, butter and eggs; Chef B kneads and rolls the dough; and Chef C folds the pastry and puts it into an oven at the correct temperature for the right time. So, who made the croissant?Apple has been steadfast in insisting that the iPhone is an American product. That’s not just marketing speak. Not only does it do the design, its U.S.-based team is in charge of sourcing all components, ensuring they all work together, and deciding the layout and assembly of the circuitry that goes inside.Foxconn is a master at production – kneading and rolling the dough – which means breaking manufacturing down into small, specific steps, and then replicating that process 200 million times per year. Foxconn also does the last step – folding the iPhone pastry and putting it into ovens.Since the “oven” is in China, iPhones get stamped with “Made in China.” But Apple is right to insist that “Designed in California” be etched onto every device, because that’s where the product is also made.An iPhone isn’t made only in China and California. It’s also made in Suwon, South Korea – the headquarters of Samsung Electronics Co.; Eindhoven, the Netherlands, where NXP Semiconductors NV is based; in Dallas, the home of Texas Instruments Inc.; and in Hsinchu, Taiwan, where Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. is located.Who gets the most credit should come down to who adds the most value, in my view. One way to look at this is through operating margin. While an imperfect measure, this is as good a rule of thumb as any. It tells you the difference between what a company paid to gather the inputs of a product (including staff) and what customers were willing to pay for those inputs after the company added its own value.By this gauge, it’s clear that Apple really is the “maker” of the iPhone, even though it does very little manufacturing. Foxconn does the final assembly, yet its margins are one-tenth those of its client. Apple’s operating profit last year was $71 billion. Hon Hai, which gets half its sales from Apple, earned $4.5 billion.Much value is added by other companies, from the southern U.S. to western Europe to northern Taiwan, where margins are even higher than Apple’s. None earn the label “Made in” because there are many more steps still to come.Only some of Foxconn’s hundreds of thousands of employees in China do final assembly – the stage that garners the “Made in China” stamp. And that last step doesn’t need to done there. In 2011, at the behest of Apple and to get around tariffs, it set up assembly in Brazil. Most of the real work was still done back in China, with manufacturing in South America being more akin to assembling Legos. Nonetheless, the iPhones were branded “Made in Brazil.”With around 40 percent of Apple’s sales coming from the Americas last year, and 217 million iPhones sold worldwide, that means around 90 million units per year would need to be manufactured outside China to serve the U.S. market. Roughly speaking, that’s close to 250,000 per day.Foxconn once set up an entire iPad factory in Chengdu within 90 days, so it’s no stretch to believe that it could put together final-assembly lines for iPhones in a variety of locales – Mexico, Vietnam, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Taiwan  – in short order. The company could also staff those factories if the wages are right, which means someone would have to pay the costs. U.S. President Donald Trump seems keen on removing the “Made in China” label from the U.S., but it really is just that. A label. To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Foxconn's founder wants Apple to move plants out of China
    Yahoo Finance Video5 days ago

    Why Foxconn's founder wants Apple to move plants out of China

    Foxconn’s founder Terry Gou wants Apple to move some production out of China and invest in Taiwan, according to Bloomberg. Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith & Dan Howley discuss on "The Ticker."

  • How serious is Foxconn's push to move Apple production out of China?
    Yahoo Finance Video5 days ago

    How serious is Foxconn's push to move Apple production out of China?

    Yahoo Finance's Dan Howley reports on Foxconn officials urging Apple to move production out of China. Julie Hyman, Adam Shapiro, Brian Cheung, and Jared Blikre further discuss.

  • FoxConn founder suggests Apple moves production out of China
    Yahoo Finance Video5 days ago

    FoxConn founder suggests Apple moves production out of China

    Terry Gou, the founder of Foxconn is urging Apple to move plants from China to Tawain. It's important to note, Gou has since resigned from Foxconn and is running for president of Taiwan. Yahoo Finance's Akiko Fujita, Kristin Myers and Heidi Chung discuss.