6752.T - Panasonic Corporation

Tokyo - Tokyo Delayed Price. Currency in JPY
1,105.00
-8.50 (-0.76%)
At close: 3:15PM JST
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Previous Close1,113.50
Open1,110.00
Bid1,104.00 x 0
Ask1,105.50 x 0
Day's Range1,103.00 - 1,116.50
52 Week Range787.70 - 1,138.00
Volume6,400,100
Avg. Volume6,865,151
Market Cap2.578T
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.43
PE Ratio (TTM)9.50
EPS (TTM)116.31
Earnings DateFeb 03, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield30.00 (2.66%)
Ex-Dividend DateSep 27, 2019
1y Target Est1,450.90
  • Business Wire

    At CES 2020 Panasonic Demonstrates the Future of Mobility, Immersive Entertainment, Broadcasting for Gaming and More

    At CES 2020, Panasonic is showcasing a variety of solutions such as smart mobility, immersive entertainment, broadcasting for gaming and more.

  • Panasonic's connected miniature fire truck has niches to fill
    Autoblog

    Panasonic's connected miniature fire truck has niches to fill

    Panasonic began collaborating with Tropos Motors in 2019 to create small electric vehicles with connected technology. A modular design allows for a variety of commercial uses, and for CES 2020, the partnership fruited new applications such as a miniature fire truck and a last-mile cooled delivery vehicle. Tropos Motors is a Silicon Valley-based tech company that builds all-electric street-legal, low-speed vehicles.

  • Business Wire

    Panasonic Delivers Large Screen Displays, Audio Systems and Various Stadium Equipment to the National Stadium

    Panasonic delivered a wide range of stadium equipment including large screen displays and audio systems to the newly built National Stadium in Tokyo.

  • Bloomberg

    HP Wins $439 Million As Judge Triples Jury Price-Fix Award

    (Bloomberg) -- HP Inc. was awarded $439 million in damages against Quanta Storage Inc. and its U.S. subsidiary after a federal judge tripled a jury’s 2019 award for damages caused by a widespread scheme to inflate the price of optical disk drives.In October, a Houston jury ordered Quanta to pay HP $176 million in damages. U.S. District Judge David Hittner said Friday that Quanta hadn’t shown any reason why the jury’s findings should be set aside. He tripled the damages award, as authorized under antitrust law, to $528 million before deducting the $89 million in settlements paid by the other companies HP accused of participating in the price-fixing scheme.Other disk-drive makers like Hitachi-LG, Sony and Panasonic settled with HP over the past decade. Only Taiwan-based Quanta chose to go to trial.Andrew Lusby, an attorney for Quanta, said Friday the company was not commenting at this time on the tripled damages. The company had argued to Hittner that tripling damages would violate constitutional prohibitions on excessive punitive damages. But the judge rejected that argument, pointing out that antitrust law allows for tripling awards as compensatory rather than punitive damages.“HP hopes this judgment sends a powerful message to suppliers all over the world that there are significant consequences when you violate US antitrust laws,” Alex B. Roberts, HP’s lawyer, said in an email after Hittner ruled.The case is Hewlett-Packard Co. v Quanta Storage, 4:18-762, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas (Houston).To contact the reporter on this story: Laurel Calkins in New York at laurel@calkins.us.comTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Anthony LinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Panasonic Develops Tempered Vacuum Insulated Glass to Increase Variations in Vacuum Insulated Glass with Its Proprietary Technology

    Panasonic has developed tempered vacuum insulated glass and another vacuum insulated glass with the industry’s first transparent pillars.

  • How Much Would You Pay to Work Less?
    Bloomberg

    How Much Would You Pay to Work Less?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Companies from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. to Monsanto Co. have gotten serious about making work more flexible. Thanks to apps and gadgets, you can easily tap away from a living-room couch, the bleachers at your son’s soccer game or huddled over a coconut on your Christmas vacation. There’s a hidden cost to all this for women, though – and it isn’t just the prospect of being available around the clock.A recent working paper from the International Monetary Fund measured how much salary Japanese employees would be willing to forgo to enjoy a healthier work-life balance. It found that earners making 3 million yen ($27,600) a year would give up nearly half of their income to avoid putting in 45 hours or more of overtime per month. That outcome was roughly consistent with higher-wage workers, too.The most obvious takeaway would be that companies should do everything they can to keep hours reasonable. It doesn’t take an MBA to see that lower salaries would improve the bottom line, with the added upside of happier and possibly more productive workers. There’s an important caveat, however: Women are much more eager than men to give up money for time. That mostly comes down to deeper feelings of guilt, according to the paper, not just for child-rearing but also general household responsibilities such as cooking and caring for aging parents.While this conclusion isn’t revolutionary, the policy implications are stark. For every woman who is willing to accept less money for more flexibility, there’s someone out there inclined to put in that 14-hour day at a desk. This suggests that companies eager to give women more choice by offering a four-day week or shorter hours, may wind up inadvertently deepening gender pay gaps. The better way to protect work-life balance, then, is to make sure all employees – male, female, young, old, parents and the childless – are spending fewer, more productive hours on the clock. There’s ample research to show that working more doesn’t necessarily produce better results. In fact, productivity drops off when employees work more than 50 hours a week, according to a Stanford University study. Whether you work 70 hours or 56 hours, output is roughly the same.Despite Japan’s reputation for burning the midnight oil, Americans work even more: 1,786 hours per year compared with 1,680, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Germany works the fewest at 1,363. Yet Germany is the most productive of the three, as measured by gross domestic product per hour, followed by Japan, then the U.S.The good news is that employers are starting to respond. In August, Microsoft Corp. tested out a four-day work week in its Japan locations. Productivity rose 40% from a year earlier. One local-government office in downtown Tokyo resorted to shutting off the lights at 7 p.m. to force people to go home. And in Europe, financial industry groups are pressing the London Stock Exchange to cut its trading day by 90 minutes.All this awareness is a good thing; employers and policymakers just need to recognize the pitfalls. The most troubling element of the IMF paper may have been women’s willingness to make less in a country where the pay gap is already so wide. The median income for Japanese men is 24.5% higher than for men and women. That compares with an average of 13.5% in the OECD and 18.2% in the U.S. Flexible working can mean a lot of things: telecommuting, shorter work weeks, or even the ability to set a fluid schedule, so long as you hit a certain number of hours. These options benefit men and women alike. I can’t think of a single parent who doesn’t appreciate the ability to stay on top of emails while sitting in the waiting room at the pediatrician.But what if all that multitasking only adds hours and stress? At a previous job, when my son was a baby, I was able to leave the office early to put him to bed. Yet I recall many nights spent staring into the white halo of my iPhone, crafting emails with one finger, and nursing him in the crook of my spare arm. I probably would have been willing to give up a fair chunk of salary to guiltlessly complete that work in the morning – and could have finished it quicker, to boot. Many women are wary of flexible schedules for this precise reason: They know they’ll end up working for free. Even companies with the best intentions will have difficulty accounting for an evolving definition of what constitutes time spent on the job.That’s why flexible HR policies are meaningless if culture doesn’t evolve more quickly. Japanese employees get some of the most generous family-leave packages in the world, yet few fathers take advantage of them, as my colleague Anjani Trivedi has noted. People there are literally working themselves to death with 100-hour weeks.Konosuke Matsushita, the founder of Panasonic Corp. and business-management guru, said you should think of your career as a “three-day chore” — that is, approach simple tasks with the sincerity of a lifelong occupation. It’s about time we bring as much commitment to protecting our well-being. To contact the author of this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Patrick McDowell at pmcdowell10@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Rachel Rosenthal is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. Previously, she was a markets reporter and editor at the Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    A 60% Tumble for Sage Therapeutics, and Two More Numbers to Know

    Another biotech company, (ACAD) (ACAD), also saw its stock jump 14%. There is sure to be more big biotech news coming up. It makes sense for GM to pair up with LG Chem (051910.Korea), rather than go it alone.

  • Business Wire

    Panasonic and KOSÉ Set to Commence Verification Test for Personalized Proposals Utilizing Snow Beauty Mirror

    Panasonic and KOSÉ will commence a verification test using Panasonic’s Snow Beauty Mirror that can analyze skin profile for personalized proposals.

  • Israel's TowerJazz to maintain 51% stake in Panasonic chip JV
    Reuters

    Israel's TowerJazz to maintain 51% stake in Panasonic chip JV

    Israeli chip manufacturer TowerJazz said on Monday it will not sell its 51% stake and board control in its joint venture (JV) with Panasonic Corp in Japan. This follows an announcement last week that Panasonic will sell its semiconductor business to Taiwan's Nuvoton Technology Corp for $250 million. "Pursuant to its long-term strategy and growth plans, TowerJazz will continue its operations and manufacturing activity at TPSCo Japanese manufacturing facilities," TowerJazz said in a statement.

  • Zacks Small Cap Research

    TSEM: Panasonic is Selling its Share of TPSCo to Nuvoton as of June 1, 2020

    By Lisa Thompson NASDAQ:TSEM READ THE FULL TSEM RESEARCH REPORT As the result of the corporate-wide strategy of Panasonic Corp. to purge its unprofitable businesses, Panasonic is selling all its semiconductor operations to Nuvoton Technology Corporation for $250 million in cash. This sale includes Panasonic’s interest in TPSCo, the joint venture with TowerJazz (NASDAQ:TSEM). The sale set to

  • Panasonic to sell its chip unit to Taiwan's Nuvoton for $250 million
    Reuters

    Panasonic to sell its chip unit to Taiwan's Nuvoton for $250 million

    Panasonic Corp said it would sell its loss-making semiconductor unit to Taiwan's Nuvoton Technology Corp for $250 million as the Japanese electronics giant struggles to lift its profit amid a lack of growth drivers. The sale is part of Panasonic's plans to cut fixed costs by 100 billion yen ($920 million) by the year ending in March 2022 by consolidating production sites and overhauling loss-making businesses. Panasonic has already divested most of its chip business as it lost to more nimble Korean and Taiwanese rivals, and has shut down or shifted its manufacturing facilities to its joint venture (JV) with Israel's Tower Semiconductor.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Panasonic to sell its chip unit to Taiwan's Nuvoton for $250 million

    Panasonic Corp said it would sell its loss-making semiconductor unit to Taiwan's Nuvoton Technology Corp for $250 million as the Japanese electronics giant struggles to lift its profit amid a lack of growth drivers. The sale is part of Panasonic's plans to cut fixed costs by 100 billion yen ($920 million) by the year ending in March 2022 by consolidating production sites and overhauling loss-making businesses. Panasonic has already divested most of its chip business as it lost to more nimble Korean and Taiwanese rivals, and has shut down or shifted its manufacturing facilities to its joint venture (JV) with Israel's Tower Semiconductor.

  • Panasonic's Continuous Sustainable Seafood Efforts in Its Corporate Cafeterias Win "Japan Sustainable Seafood Award" Champion
    Business Wire

    Panasonic's Continuous Sustainable Seafood Efforts in Its Corporate Cafeterias Win "Japan Sustainable Seafood Award" Champion

    On November 7, 2019, Panasonic's efforts to transform consumer behavior and contribute to the achievement of SDGs by promoting sustainable seafood in its corporate cafeterias won the Initiative Award Champion at the inaugural "Japan Sustainable Seafood Award" during the Tokyo Sustainable Seafood Symposium 2019.

  • Panasonic Begins Offering API for Facial Recognition Utilizing Deep Learning Technology
    Business Wire

    Panasonic Begins Offering API for Facial Recognition Utilizing Deep Learning Technology

    No initial fee, cloud-based service incorporates into smartphone apps, websites, and access management systems

  • Benzinga

    Panasonic Won't Make Batteries For Tesla In China

    Panasonic Corporation (OTC: PCRFY) has no plans to make car batteries for Tesla Inc (NASDAQ: TSLA) at its new Shanghai plant, the company’s President Kazuhiro Tsuga said on Friday, as reported by The Nikkei. The electric vehicle maker Tesla will have to either use the batteries Panasonic already makes at Tesla’s “gigafactory” in Nevada or find another supplier in China, Tsuga told reporters ahead of an investor presentation in Tokyo. "It's up to Tesla to decide whether it will use batteries we produce at the Gigafactory in Nevada or those made by Chinese companies," Tsuga said.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Panasonic has no plans for new Tesla battery plant in China -CEO

    Panasonic Corp has no plans to build a new battery plant for Tesla Inc in China, the Japanese company's chief executive said, as it struggles to make money from its existing battery business with the electric vehicle (EV) maker. "We don't have any plans at the moment to set up a production site in China for Tesla's Chinese business," CEO Kazuhiro Tsuga told reporters at a strategy briefing on Friday. "It is up to Tesla to decide whether it would use Chinese-made batteries from other manufacturers or get batteries from our Gigafactory 1 (in Nevada)," he said.

  • Panasonic has no plans for new Tesla battery plant in China: CEO
    Reuters

    Panasonic has no plans for new Tesla battery plant in China: CEO

    Panasonic Corp has no plans to build a new battery plant for Tesla Inc in China, the Japanese company's chief executive said, as it struggles to make profits from its existing battery business with the electric vehicle maker. "We don't have any plans at the moment to set up a production site in China for Tesla's Chinese business," CEO Kazuhiro Tsuga told reporters at a strategy briefing on Friday. "It is up to Tesla to decide whether it would use Chinese-made batteries from other manufacturers or get batteries from our Gigafactory 1 (in Nevada)," he said.

  • At CIIE 2019 Panasonic Showcases Solutions to Help Bring to Life China's "Healthy China 2030" Vision
    Business Wire

    At CIIE 2019 Panasonic Showcases Solutions to Help Bring to Life China's "Healthy China 2030" Vision

    Panasonic Corporation took part in the 2nd China International Import Expo 2019, which was held in Shanghai from November 5 to 10. Under the theme, "Limitless Care for Healthy Living," Panasonic showcased health and welfare products and solutions that reflect its unique health values.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 3-Japan's economy nearly stalls in Q3, growth at 1-year low as trade war bites

    Japan's economy ground to a near standstill in the third quarter with growth at its weakest in a year as the U.S.-China trade war and soft global demand knocked exports, keeping pressure on policymakers to ramp up stimulus to bolster a fragile recovery. Private consumption also cooled from the previous quarter, casting doubt on the Bank of Japan's view that robust domestic demand will offset the impact from intensifying global risks.

  • Tesla Reaches Preliminary Battery-Supply Deal With CATL
    Bloomberg

    Tesla Reaches Preliminary Battery-Supply Deal With CATL

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. has reached a preliminary agreement to start using CATL as a battery supplier for cars made in China from as early as next year, and the companies are in talks to expand the relationship globally, according to people familiar with the matter.Following months of negotiations, the companies clinched a non-binding deal after Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk traveled to Shanghai in late August and met with CATL Chairman Zeng Yuqun for about 40 minutes, according to the people, who asked not to be named discussing private deliberations. Though a final agreement is expected to be signed by mid 2020, there is no guarantee that will happen, the people said.The batteries would go into Model 3 cars produced at Tesla’s factory near Shanghai, which is slated to begin operating this year. But the companies still need to iron out details such as how many batteries Tesla will purchase, and separate discussions are underway on a potential global supply contract, the people said. Tesla will use batteries from Panasonic Corp. and LG Chem Ltd. in China in the meantime, one of the people said.Securing enough domestic batteries -- the costliest part of an electric vehicle -- is crucial to Musk’s efforts to expand in the world’s biggest car market. Chinese supply would allow Palo Alto, California-based Tesla to rely less on imports, reducing any impact from tariffs that have fluctuated amid the U.S.-China trade war. It’s also likely to please Beijing, which has prioritized the building of a world-leading electric-vehicle ecosystem.CATL rose as much as 7.4% to 78.88 yuan in Shenzhen trading on Wednesday and the stock headed for its highest close since mid-September. Tesla was little changed Tuesday.Representatives for Tesla didn’t respond to requests for comment. LG Chem and CATL declined to comment, while Panasonic wasn’t immediately available to comment.For CATL, whose full name is Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. Ltd., a final agreement would bolster its profile as one of the world’s emerging battery-making powerhouses. The company, based in the southern province of Fujian, already supplies domestic EV startups including NIO Inc., as well as global carmakers Volkswagen AG and Daimler AG.Tesla has been building the Shanghai plant, its first outside the U.S., for the past nine months, with mass production targeted to start at year-end. The company is also building facilities to eventually make batteries, but in the meantime, it’s agreed to purchase them from LG Chem. The South Korean battery maker won’t have exclusive rights to be Tesla’s battery supplier, people familiar with the arrangement said in August.Should Tesla agree to a global agreement, CATL would become its second such battery partner after Osaka, Japan-based Panasonic.What Bloomberg Intelligence Says“It’s a competitive blow to Panasonic as Tesla was relying on the Japanese battery producer only. But it’s a boon for CATL and LG Chem.”\--Kevin Kim, automobiles analystTesla is likely to try having several strong suppliers, giving it negotiating power as they’ll compete and drive down battery prices, said Kevin Kim, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in Hong Kong. Having several partners also helps Tesla diversify risks such as faulty batteries resulting in fires.NIO Jumps 37% After Pact With Intel on Driverless Car TechnologyBatteries make up the bulk of an electric vehicle’s cost, meaning long-term supply deals with top carmakers can easily reach billions of dollars. The price of a China-built Tesla Model 3 will start at about $50,000, cheaper than foes including NIO’s best-selling ES6.(Updates with comment from analyst in 10th paragraph)\--With assistance from Kyunghee Park, Kae Inoue, Dana Hull and Gabrielle Coppola.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Haze Fan in Beijing at hfan40@bloomberg.net;Chunying Zhang in Shanghai at czhang714@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, ;Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Ville Heiskanen, Will DaviesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.