6758.T - Sony Corporation

Tokyo - Tokyo Delayed Price. Currency in JPY
5,851.00
-144.00 (-2.40%)
At close: 3:15PM JST
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Previous Close5,995.00
Open6,030.00
Bid5,850.00 x 0
Ask5,856.00 x 0
Day's Range5,842.00 - 6,047.00
52 Week Range4,507.00 - 6,973.00
Volume7,727,500
Avg. Volume6,203,730
Market Cap7.289T
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.83
PE Ratio (TTM)8.96
EPS (TTM)652.79
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield40.00 (0.67%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-27
1y Target Est8,085.50
  • Sony Ends Spider-Man Deal With Disney's Marvel
    Motley Fool

    Sony Ends Spider-Man Deal With Disney's Marvel

    This might go down in history as one of the riskiest moves by a movie studio. Ever.

  • The Movie Biz: Peter Fonda was an Amerikan hero
    American City Business Journals

    The Movie Biz: Peter Fonda was an Amerikan hero

    Fonda, who died Aug. 16, was a lot more complicated than his over-praised biker odyssey about hippie drug dealers, writes film critic Eleanor Ringel-Cater.

  • Sony Ends Spider-Man Deal, Acquires Game Developer
    Market Realist

    Sony Ends Spider-Man Deal, Acquires Game Developer

    Sony has announced it is acquiring its game development partner, Insomniac Games. Meanwhile, its Spider-Man deal with Disney's Marvel Studios has ended.

  • The two best Spider-Man movies were made without Disney’s involvement
    Quartz

    The two best Spider-Man movies were made without Disney’s involvement

    The future of Spider-Man on the big screen is in doubt after Disney and Sony failed to come to a new agreement. But this could be a good thing.

  • Gamescom 2019: Upcoming Titles on PS4 and Stadia
    Market Realist

    Gamescom 2019: Upcoming Titles on PS4 and Stadia

    Gamescom 2019 began this week with the announcement of some exciting cross-platform games. Developers certainly didn't disappoint.

  • Sony-Disney Spat Threatens Spider-Man’s Role in Marvel Films
    Bloomberg

    Sony-Disney Spat Threatens Spider-Man’s Role in Marvel Films

    (Bloomberg) -- A dispute between Walt Disney Co. and Sony Corp. threatens to end their co-production of “Spider-Man” films, according to people familiar with the situation, putting the future of one of Marvel’s most beloved characters up in the air.The two sides haven’t been able to agree on new terms for their partnership, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the discussions are private. Sony holds the film rights to the popular Marvel character, even though Disney acquired Marvel Studios for $4 billion in 2009.A falling-out between two of Hollywood’s biggest studios would mean Marvel President Kevin Feige won’t be lending his touch to future Spider-Man films, and the character won’t appear in Disney’s Marvel films -- a series dubbed the Marvel Cinematic Universe, or MCU, that’s generated more than $22.5 billion globally.In a statement, Sony said media reports about the dispute “mischaracterized” the discussions, but it acknowledged that Feige wouldn’t be lead producer on its next live-action Spider-Man film.“We are disappointed, but respect Disney’s decision,” Sony said in an emailed statement. “Kevin is terrific and we are grateful for his help and guidance and appreciate the path he has helped put us on, which we will continue.”Fans had speculated that Sony might have to reboot its Spider-Man saga now that it’s parting ways with Disney. But Sony is expected to continue with the series, which has starred Tom Holland as Spider-Man.Too Busy?Sony cast the decision as a matter of Feige being busy with Disney’s now-enlarged Marvel empire. With the acquisition of Fox intellectual property earlier this year, the entertainment giant gained a trove of new comic-book characters, including the X-Men, that Feige may eventually weave into the MCU.“We hope this might change in the future, but understand that the many new responsibilities that Disney has given him -- including all their newly added Marvel properties -- do not allow time for him to work on IP they do not own,” Sony said.Some people familiar with the situation had described the clash as more of a financial issue. Disney has been requesting a 50% share of profits in the films going forward. Sony wanted to keep the current arrangement, in which Disney gets a 5% share of box-office revenue, according to the Deadline website, which reported earlier on the dispute.The two Hollywood giants agreed in 2015 to work together on films featuring the web-slinging superhero after several of Sony’s Spider-Man films underperformed. The first feature in their collaboration, 2017’s “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” captured $880 million in ticket sales worldwide, the best performance of the franchise up until then. A follow-up, this year’s “Spider-Man: Far From Home,” grossed $1.1 billion, a record for the series and for Sony.Spider-Man, played by Holland, also was featured in MCU films such as this year’s “Avengers: Endgame,” the highest-grossing film of all time.(Updates with Sony statement in fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Christopher Palmeri in Los Angeles at cpalmeri1@bloomberg.net;Anousha Sakoui in Los Angeles at asakoui@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, John J. Edwards IIIFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Mario Gabelli Comments on Sony Corp

    Guru stock highlight Continue reading...

  • How Does Fortnite Make Money: Online Gaming, eSports
    Investopedia

    How Does Fortnite Make Money: Online Gaming, eSports

    Fortnite is the most popular battle royale game worldwide, and generates huge revenues even though it is offered for free by developer, Epic Games.

  • Motley Fool

    Disney Announces Additional Launch Dates for Disney+

    Soon after its U.S. debut, the streaming service will begin rolling out globally.

  • Sony to buy video game company with Durham operation
    American City Business Journals

    Sony to buy video game company with Durham operation

    Playstation parent Sony Interactive Entertainment is buying a video game giant – one with a continued presence in Durham.

  • Sony to buy 'Spider-Man' developer Insomniac Games
    Reuters

    Sony to buy 'Spider-Man' developer Insomniac Games

    The deal will help the console maker, a unit of Japan's Sony Corp, boost its game offerings ahead of the launch of rival game streaming services from companies, including Alphabet Inc's Google, and as it prepares to unveil PlayStation 5 next year. In its bid to maintain market share in the $150 billion https://newzoo.com/insights/articles/the-global-games-market-will-generate-152-1-billion-in-2019-as-the-u-s-overtakes-china-as-the-biggest-market global video gaming market, Sony in March partnered with main rival Microsoft Corp, the maker of Xbox game console, to stream games and content to consumers as well as offer game makers new development tools. Founded in 1994, Insomniac Games has worked with Sony for more than 20 years, starting with the first PlayStation.

  • The Movie Biz: The 'adult' movies of the summer worth watching
    American City Business Journals

    The Movie Biz: The 'adult' movies of the summer worth watching

    If an “adult” movie — not “Adult” as in X-rated, but “adult” as in, not a superhero movie or a teen horror flick or a teen sex comedy — opens during the summer, does it make a sound?

  • GuruFocus.com

    Daniel Loeb's 5 Biggest Stock Buys of 2nd Quarter

    New York hedge fund manager starts 16 positions Continue reading...

  • ViacomCBS is just the beginning of Shari Redstone's media deals
    Reuters

    ViacomCBS is just the beginning of Shari Redstone's media deals

    More than two months before CBS Corp and Viacom Inc succeeded at a third attempt to recombine, controlling shareholder Shari Redstone had already decided the new company needed to get bigger. "We would want to look at something after that to ... develop more scale as we move forward,” Redstone said at The Information's Women in Tech, Media and Finance conference in June. To the audience of executives in the Times Square high rise overlooking the storied Paramount building, it was clear that her ambitions went well beyond the hard-won reunion of the two companies her father, Sumner Redstone, put together and then pulled apart 13 years ago during a very different era in media.

  • Buckle Up—Gamescom 2019 Is Coming
    Market Realist

    Buckle Up—Gamescom 2019 Is Coming

    After the E3 2019 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) in June, gamers are getting ready for the next big gaming event, Gamescom 2019.

  • Bloomberg

    Gadgets Are Boring, but Video Games Are Weirder Than Ever

    (Bloomberg) -- For the past two decades, I’ve been clinging to my beloved Nintendo 64. What could ever match the video game console’s audacity of design and nostalgic allure, from its spaceship-like controller to the timeless art of its games? (Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey is the most underrated sports title of all time. Fight me.) Yet, for whatever reason, in the last year alone, I have suddenly found myself overwhelmed with a variety of contemporary gaming platforms, which now clutter my apartment like a freshman dorm room.The breadth of choices in gaming stands in stark contrast to other areas of technology. Android or iPhone? Facebook or Snapchat? Google or, um, Google? For many categories of consumer electronics, the titans of Silicon Valley churn out indistinguishable products, while the video game industry represents the rare corner of the business not entirely hampered by hegemony.The results of this dynamic are so refreshing at times I’ve actually cried. Don’t believe me? Just play Nintendo Co.’s Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and see for yourself. My (late) reintroduction to modern gaming began with the Nintendo Switch. Then came streaming devices from Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc. and Google, which all double as gaming consoles. And just last week, after hearing endless you-have-to-try-it raves about Red Dead Redemption 2, I finally succumbed and (tearfully) replaced my ol’ faithful 64, which has held a spot on the TV stand since 1996, with Microsoft Corp.’s Xbox One.There’s been a “renaissance” in gaming over the last decade or so, says Lewis Ward, an analyst at market research firm IDC. Propelled by more than two billion consumers worldwide, the market has become so diverse that Ward has had to develop an ever-growing “taxonomy” of competitors. Beyond core consoles from Sony Corp., Microsoft and Nintendo, there’s the smartphone, tablet, and streaming-based hardware from the likes of Google and Roku. There’s been a huge push into cloud-based games from Tencent Holdings Ltd. and Nvidia Corp. that can be streamed over the internet. A rash of semi-modernized retro game consoles are going on sale. Samsung Electronics Co., HTC Corp., Lenovo Group Ltd., Sony and Facebook are investing heavily in virtual reality. PC games continue to thrive, and there are fascinating new upstarts such as Panic’s Playdate. Even my retired 64 will soon get an upgrade of sorts for the high-def age.This creative success is partly driven, Ward says, by potent, cost-efficient technical components. “Computing performance and potential, from a low-end Chromecast to the latest high-end gaming rig, is massive,” he says. They offer “a much wider range of hardware, software and services, and that makes the industry a hotbed of innovation, with a more competitive environment.”It still takes a lot of money to compete. Video games are expected to generate $174 billion this year, according to IDC. Microsoft, Nintendo and Sony have over the years crushed console pioneers like Atari and Sega. Even still, the three fight severely for market share among themselves and against new entrants. Nintendo has watched its fortunes rise and fall and rise again between each new risky release. The Switch, with its mobile-inspired hardware, almost whimsical user experience and embrace of indie developers, has proven such a radical, and prosperous, departure from the Xbox and PlayStation.That kind of appetite for risk doesn’t exist in phones or search engines, where it’s futile to even try to compete. For now, we’re stuck with bland rectangles and, um, Google.This article also ran in Bloomberg Technology’s Fully Charged newsletter. Sign up here.And here’s what you need to know in global technology newsApple wants to give you $1 million. Assuming you’re a bug bounty hunter. The company’s top security engineer unveiled a program to reward people who find software vulnerabilities in its products.Uber froze hiring within its technology division in the U.S. and Canada. The pause will last through the end of the year. Uber’s disappointing quarter follows a slew of underwhelming financial reports from once-hyped companies after their recent IPOs.There’s a billion-dollar race to become the Amazon Twitch of China. Douyu, a leading streaming service, generates about 90% of its revenue from virtual gifts.Foxconn faces renewed scrutiny over deteriorating labor conditions. The issue was sparked by allegations about a China factory that assembles Amazon devices.Huawei is doubling down on HarmonyOS. The Chinese company seeks to curb its dependence on Android and other U.S. technologies.To contact the author of this story: Austin Carr in New York at acarr54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tencent May Buy a Big Stake in Universal Music Group
    Motley Fool

    Tencent May Buy a Big Stake in Universal Music Group

    Such a move would help the tech giant reinforce its leading position in China’s evolving music market.

  • Samsung Loosens Sony's Grip on Cutting-Edge China Phone Cameras
    Bloomberg

    Samsung Loosens Sony's Grip on Cutting-Edge China Phone Cameras

    (Bloomberg) -- Samsung Electronics Co. scored a victory over Sony Corp. after a major Chinese customer declared it was going with the Korean company’s camera sensors in future smartphones.On Wednesday, Xiaomi Corp. said it will turn to Samsung for a future line of its mainstream Redmi smartphones with an impressive 64-megapixel camera. That’s part of a strategic alliance under which the two companies will collaborate on developing next-generation camera technology, Xiaomi co-founder Lin Bin told reporters in Beijing.Until now, the smartphone brand had relied mainly on global leader Sony for the sensors that power its digital cameras, though it does also buy some from Samsung as well. While it’s unclear how much business Xiaomi’s decision would translate into, the move is an encouraging sign of competition for a mobile imaging sensor market that Sony has dominated in recent years. And it’s a way for Samsung -- whose smartphone sales have all but evaporated in China -- to tap the world’s biggest mobile arena by selling components instead of devices.The new tie-up adds an intriguing competitor for budget devices. Xiaomi and its partner are working on technology capable of capturing images as large as 108 megapixels, Lin told a news briefing. This is typically done by using software to stitch together multiple exposures, and there’s as yet no mobile camera sensor with such an extreme resolution. The technology will be deployed across Xiaomi phones “soon enough,” Lin added.Current top-tier Xiaomi devices, such as the Mix 3 and Mi 9, are equipped with multiple cameras with up to 48 megapixels of resolution, serviced primarily by Sony technology.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Vlad SavovFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • There's no evidence to back up Trump's claim that video games cause mass shootings
    Yahoo Finance

    There's no evidence to back up Trump's claim that video games cause mass shootings

    Trump is trying to lay the blame for the weekend's mass shootings on video games, but there's no evidence to back it up.

  • The evolving artist-Spotify relationship 'mirrors the society of our times'
    Yahoo Finance

    The evolving artist-Spotify relationship 'mirrors the society of our times'

    Spotify and other streaming mainstays continue to dominate the industry, but artists are struggling to gain in the changing music landscape.

  • As Japan frets about dearth of AI talent, Daikin develops own programme
    Reuters

    As Japan frets about dearth of AI talent, Daikin develops own programme

    There's a sense of panic within Japan Inc and the government - the world's No. 3 economy doesn't have enough experts in artificial intelligence and it's time to do something about it. SoftBank Group Corp CEO Masayoshi Son last month bemoaned the state of play, calling Japan a 'developing country' in the most important current tech revolution. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in June unveiled a plan to train 250,000 people in AI skills annually by 2025, albeit one criticised as unrealistic due to a shortage of teachers.