8035.T - Tokyo Electron Limited

Tokyo - Tokyo Delayed Price. Currency in JPY
16,630.00
-30.00 (-0.18%)
At close: 3:15PM JST
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Previous Close16,660.00
Open16,795.00
Bid16,620.00 x 0
Ask16,640.00 x 0
Day's Range16,475.00 - 16,805.00
52 Week Range11,595.00 - 20,195.00
Volume1,028,000
Avg. Volume1,377,773
Market Cap2.719T
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)15.32
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateJul 26, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est18,721.10
  • U.S. Companies Find Legal Ways Around Trump’s Huawei Blacklist
    Bloomberg19 days ago

    U.S. Companies Find Legal Ways Around Trump’s Huawei Blacklist

    (Bloomberg) -- American technology companies have resumed selling certain products to Huawei Technologies Co. after concluding there are legal ways to work with the Chinese telecom giant in spite of its inclusion on a Trump Administration blacklist.Micron Technology Inc., the largest U.S. maker of computer memory chips, said on Tuesday that it had started shipping some components to Huawei after its lawyers studied export restrictions. Intel Corp., the largest microprocessor maker, has also begun selling to Huawei again, according to a person familiar with the matter. It’s not clear how many other suppliers have reached the same conclusion.The U.S. Commerce Department added Huawei last month to what’s known as an entity list, a move designed to bar the Chinese company from buying American components and software. The Trump Administration said Huawei helps Beijing in espionage and represents a security threat -- charges the company denies. Officials at Commerce and the White House are frustrated that companies have resumed Huawei shipments, according to another person familiar with the matter. The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.The chipmakers are taking advantage of certain exceptions to the export restrictions. Even when companies have headquarters in the U.S., they may be able, through ownership of overseas subsidiaries and operations, to classify their technology as foreign, according to Cross Research analyst Steven Fox. If less than 25% of the technology in a chip originates in the U.S., for example, then it may not be covered by the ban, under current rules.“It took them weeks to figure this out,” Fox said. “What they did was look at the laws and the rules and applied them to their business.”Micron, which also reported earnings on Tuesday that topped analysts’ estimates, soared as much as 14% in New York trading. Intel, Nvidia Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. also rallied, while Asian chipmakers from Tokyo Electron Ltd. to SK Hynix Inc. gained too.Micron has operations all over the world, some added through acquisitions, and it owns plants in Singapore, Japan and Taiwan. Intel has factories in China and Ireland and a major design center and production facility in Israel. The company declined to comment.Companies can legally continue some shipments to Huawei under what’s known as the de minimis rule, says Kevin Wolf, former head of the Commerce Department’s export control section.“Commodities made overseas from U.S.-origin technology are only subject to the entity list prohibitions if the technology and commodity are sensitive items controlled for ‘national security’ reasons,” Wolf said. “But a commodity made overseas from less sensitive U.S.-origin technology is not subject to the entity list prohibitions.”The de minimis threshold is 25%, according to the Commerce Department.National security hawks in the Trump Administration thought that inclusion on the entity list would ratchet up pressure on Huawei, but they didn’t understand or misinterpreted the existing rules, people familiar with internal deliberations said. Those advisers didn’t fully grasp the limits of export controls in constricting supply chains that reach deeply into China.Micron Chief Executive Officer Sanjay Mehrotra, in a conference call discussing his company’s earnings, declined to explain his analysis, despite repeated questions. In a brief interview after the call, he also wouldn’t elaborate and said he hopes the U.S. and China quickly resolve their trade dispute.The Semiconductor Industry Association trade group put out a statement aimed at supporting its members’ right to keep working with an important customer: “SIA companies are committed to rigorous compliance with U.S. export control regulations. As we have discussed with the U.S. government, it is now clear some items may be supplied to Huawei consistent with the Entity List and applicable regulations.”The trade war and Huawei sanctions put U.S. chipmakers in a tough position. They need to comply with new rules in their home country, while at the same time navigating the intricacies of business in China, an increasingly crucial market. More than 60% of the $470 billion of chips sold last year went through China.If Huawei’s American suppliers can resume some sales, that may avoid the detrimental financial impact many have been anticipating.Even though these companies have found ways to legally keep exporting some of their products to Huawei, they are prohibited from providing post-sale support like software updates, repairs or installation help. That means that while an item in a box can be shipped from Taiwan to China, for example, the company still can’t provide information on software repairs or assistance from Silicon Valley. Wolf said that, in his experience, that can be a significant handicap.Finding legal ways to sidestep restrictions is taking on added significance for U.S. companies as the Trump Administration expands curbs on technology exports to China. Last week, the Commerce Department blacklisted five Chinese entities over accusations they were developing supercomputers for military applications. Bloomberg has also reported that some Chinese video surveillance firms may be barred from U.S. suppliers.The Commerce Department could easily change the definition of what foreign-made items are subject to the regulations. That change wouldn’t require Congressional approval, Wolf said. Still, it’s not clear if the Trump administration is looking into making such changes.“Micron will continue to comply with all government and legal requirements just as we do in all our operations globally,” said Micron CEO Mehrotra. “Of course, we cannot predict whether additional government actions may further impact our ability to ship to Huawei.”(Updates with Micron, other chipmaker shares from the sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Tom GilesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters19 days ago

    Nikkei drops as Fed caution weighs on sentiment; chip shares soar

    Japan's Nikkei fell on Wednesday after the U.S. Federal Reserve chairman pushed back on pressure from President Donald Trump to cut interest rates, although chip-related stocks gained. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Tuesday said the U.S. central bank is "insulated from short-term political pressures," as policymakers faced new calls by Trump to cut interest rates.

  • Reuters19 days ago

    Nikkei drops after Fed rate comments; chip-related shares buck weakness

    Japan's Nikkei fell on Wednesday after the U.S. Federal Reserve chairman pushed back on pressure from President Donald Trump to cut interest rates, but chip-related stocks gained. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Tuesday said the U.S. central bank is "insulated from short-term political pressures," as policymakers faced new calls by Trump to cut interest rates.

  • These Are the Japanese Companies That Pay Executives Best
    Bloomberg20 days ago

    These Are the Japanese Companies That Pay Executives Best

    (Bloomberg) -- It’s official -- SoftBank Group Corp. is Japan’s most generous employer, at least when it comes to executive pay.Six of the country’s 10 biggest salary packages last fiscal year were offered by SoftBank, according to a report from Tokyo Shoko Research Ltd. SoftBank Group Vice Chairman Ronald Fisher topped the list with 3.27 billion yen ($31 million) in the period ended March 31. Toyota Motor Corp. director Didier Leroy, the highest-paid non-SoftBank executive, ranked No. 5, while Sony Corp. Chief Executive Officer Kenichiro Yoshida was 8th.SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son has a history of paying top dollar to attract high-profile executives. Former SoftBank President Nikesh Arora still holds Japan’s all-time record with the 10.3 billion yen package he received in fiscal 2016, according to the report. Since then, Son’s hunt for global talent accelerated as he launched a $100 billion Vision Fund to invest in the world’s biggest technology companies. SoftBank paid a total of 9.1 billion yen in compensation to six lieutenants last year.Key Insights:SoftBank Group Chief Operating Officer Marcelo Claure ranked second with 1.8 billion yen. Claure, who also heads Sprint Corp. in the U.S., was named EVP in July. He also heads SoftBank’s $5 billion technology fund focused on Latin America. Ken Miyauchi, head of SoftBank’s domestic telecom operation, was third with 1.23 billion yen, followed by Simon Segars, head of its ARM Holdings Plc chip unit, with 1.1 billion yen.Former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. executive and SoftBank Group Chief Strategy Officer Katsunori Sago earned 982 million yen in the sixth place. Rajeev Misra, who heads the Vision Fund, earned 752 million yen.Son’s own salary remained modest at 229 million yen, according to a company filing in May. The billionaire controls a roughly 22% stake in SoftBank, which alone is worth about 2.3 trillion yen.Toyota paid Leroy a little over 1 billion yen. Sony CEO Yoshida made 847 million yen, 6% less than his pay last year.Chip equipment maker Tokyo Electron Ltd. was the most frequent name on the list as nine of its executives made the top 30, earning a collective 5 billion yen. Chief Executive Officer Toshiki Kawai ranked 7th with 925 million yen.To contact the reporter on this story: Pavel Alpeyev in Tokyo at palpeyev@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Exclusive: Top Japanese chip gear firm to honour U.S. blacklist of Chinese firms - executive
    Reuterslast month

    Exclusive: Top Japanese chip gear firm to honour U.S. blacklist of Chinese firms - executive

    Japan's Tokyo Electron, the world's No.3 supplier of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, will not supply to Chinese clients blacklisted by Washington, a senior company executive told Reuters. The decision shows how Washington's effort to bar sales of technology to Chinese firms, including Huawei Technologies, is ensnaring non-American firms that are not obliged to follow U.S. law. China, which is locked in a crippling trade war with the United States, is pushing to build its semiconductor industry to reduce its reliance on U.S., Japanese and European suppliers for chip-making machinery.

  • Exclusive: Top Japanese chip gear firm to honor U.S. blacklist of Chinese firms - executive
    Reuterslast month

    Exclusive: Top Japanese chip gear firm to honor U.S. blacklist of Chinese firms - executive

    Japan's Tokyo Electron, the world's No.3 supplier of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, will not supply to Chinese clients blacklisted by Washington, a senior company executive told Reuters. The decision shows how Washington's effort to bar sales of technology to Chinese firms, including Huawei Technologies, is ensnaring non-American firms that are not obliged to follow U.S. law. China, which is locked in a crippling trade war with the United States, is pushing to build its semiconductor industry to reduce its reliance on U.S., Japanese and European suppliers for chip-making machinery.

  • Reuterslast month

    Nikkei rises, investors focused on U.S. jobs report

    Japan's Nikkei rose on Friday as reports that Washington is considering a delay in tariffs on Mexican imports eased wider concerns about weakening global trade. Investor sentiment recovered slightly after Mexican and U.S. officials held a second day of talks on trade and migration on Thursday, amid reports President Donald Trump might delay the imposition of tariffs that are due on Monday. On a trade front, we still don't know the outcome for the U.S.-Mexican tariff deal, but positive reports support the mood," said Isao Kubo, equity strategist at Nissay Asset Management.

  • Reuterslast month

    Nikkei rises as Mexican tariff fears abate, exporters up

    Japan's Nikkei rose on Friday morning, tracking U.S. gains as news Washington is considering a delay in tariffs on Mexican imports eased wider concerns about global trade. Investor sentiment recovered slightly after Mexican and U.S. officials held a second day of talks on trade and migration on Thursday, amid reports President Donald Trump might delay the imposition of tariffs that was due on Monday. Cyclical stocks, such as those in chip-related sectors, were in demand, with Advantest Corp up 4.7% and Tokyo Electron rising 2.8%.

  • Reuterslast month

    Nikkei flat as trade woes, strong yen saps risk appetite; SoftBank Group falls

    Japan's Nikkei ended nearly flat in choppy trade on Tuesday as festering trade tensions and a stronger yen curbed risk appetite, while extended losses for index-heavy SoftBank Group added to the overall pressure on the market. Escalating trade tensions between the United States and China have sapped investor risk appetite and rattled financial markets in the past month.

  • Reuterslast month

    Nikkei down as trade woes, strong yen hurt; SoftBank Group extends losses

    Japan's Nikkei fell on Tuesday morning as festering trade tensions and a stronger yen hurt sentiment while extended losses for index-heavy SoftBank Group added to the overall pressure on the market. Escalating trade tensions between the United States and China have sapped investor risk appetite and rattled financial markets in the past month.

  • Reuters2 months ago

    Nikkei rises after European shares support mood; Tokyo Electron surges

    Japan's Nikkei rose on Tuesday as gains in European markets improved sentiment, while shares of Tokyo Electron surged after it announced a share buyback. After U.S. President Donald Trump met Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Monday, he told reporters he expected the two countries to be "announcing some things, probably in August, that will be very good for both countries" on trade. On Tuesday, Japan's Economy Minister Toshimitsu Motegi said Trump's comment probably reflected his hope for quick progress in negotiations.

  • Reuters3 months ago

    Nikkei buoyed by cyclical stocks; Nintendo jumps 16 pct

    Japan's Nikkei rose on Friday morning as Wall Street gains raised risk appetite and lifted cyclical stocks, while Nintendo jumped after Tencent won approval to sell its Switch console in China. The U.S. market rose supported by robust economic data, while industrial stocks rallied after China's commerce ministry spokesman said there had been new progress in U.S.-China trade talks. "The mood has recovered as the market has been able to confirm that a slowdown in the Chinese economy has hit the bottom and the U.S. and China are making progress in their trade talks as those were the market's main concerns," said Takashi Ito, an equity market strategist at Nomura Securities.

  • Reuters4 months ago

    Nikkei slides to week low dragged by chip-related firms, Renesas dives

    Japan's Nikkei slid to a one-week low on Thursday morning with chip-related stocks leading the decline in step with U.S. counterparts, while Mizuho Financial Group underperformed after it sharply cut its annual profit outlook. "Profit-taking makes sense now as ongoing U.S.-China trade talks, major concerns for the market, have provided no signs of exit plan while the market had risen smoothly for the past two months," said Hikaru Sato, a senior technical analyst at Daiwa Securities. Chip equipment makers Advantest Corp dropped 2.7 percent, Tokyo Electron plunged 3.6 percent and silicon products maker Sumco Corp dived 7.3 percent on further doubts the industry's downturn is near a bottom.

  • Bloomberg5 months ago

    Tokyo Electron Sees Potential Mid-Year Chip Rebound

    The pace of slowing demand from customers, which include all of the world’s major chipmakers, is moderating as they work through inventories, a process that could continue through the second half of 2019 and into the start of next year, Chief Executive Officer Toshiki Kawai said in an interview. The market for wafer processing equipment may shrink by about 15 to 20 percent this year, in part due to the trade war between the world’s two largest economies, Kawai said. In October, Tokyo Electron slashed its full-year operating income target by 16 percent and cut revenue outlook 8.6 percent.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents5 months ago

    Edited Transcript of 8035.T earnings conference call or presentation 31-Jan-19 8:30am GMT

    Q3 2019 Tokyo Electron Ltd Earnings Presentation

  • Reuters7 months ago

    Nikkei loses 1.9 pct as SoftBank weighs, Huawei arrest jolts chips

    Japan's Nikkei closed at more than a five-week low on Thursday as chip-related stocks were hit after Canada arrested a top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei at the request of the United States, threatening a new spike in Sino-U.S. tensions. Losses intensified later in the session as index heavyweight SoftBank Group Corp tumbled, hit by the news about Huawei and a partial disruption to its mobile phone service.

  • Reuters7 months ago

    Nikkei extends losses as SoftBank tumbles, Huawei arrest jolts chips

    Japan's Nikkei skidded to a two-week low on Thursday as chip-related stocks were hit after Canada arrested a top executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei at the request of the United States, threatening ...

  • Reuters7 months ago

    Nikkei tumbles to 2-week low as Huawei CFO's arrest jolts chip sector

    Japan's Nikkei skidded to a two-week low on Thursday, as chip-related stocks were hit after Canada arrested a senior executive of tech giant Huawei in Vancouver at the request of the United States. Canada's Department of Justice said on Wednesday Huawei's global chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou is now facing extradition to the United States.

  • Reuters8 months ago

    Nikkei rebounds after chip-related stocks bought back; financials tumble

    Japan's Nikkei share average rebounded on Monday morning after investors covered their short positions on chip-related stocks, offsetting a drop in financials which were hurt by lower U.S. yields. Last week, the benchmark index slipped 2.6 percent, hit by a drop in oil prices and tech shares. Tokyo Electron rose 2.9 percent, Advantest Corp added 2.4 percent and Screen Holdings surged 4.1 percent.

  • Chip Stock Carnage Seeps Into Asia With $11 Billion Lost
    Bloomberg8 months ago

    Chip Stock Carnage Seeps Into Asia With $11 Billion Lost

    SoftBank’s results last week included a big boost from the rally in its Nvidia stake.In Japan, declines were broad-based across the sector with equipment makers Tokyo Electron Ltd., Advantest Corp. and silicon wafer manufacturer Sumco Corp. bearing the brunt of the losses. “In the short term, weaker demand, weaker end-demand is beginning to materialize,” Amir Anvarzadeh, a senior strategist at Asymmetric Advisors in Singapore, said by phone. Both Nvidia and Applied Materials released weak forecasts.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents8 months ago

    Edited Transcript of 8035.T earnings conference call or presentation 31-Oct-18 8:00am GMT

    Q2 2019 Tokyo Electron Ltd Earnings Presentation

  • The next phase of semiconductor growth will not depend on smartphone sales: CEO
    CNBC10 months ago

    The next phase of semiconductor growth will not depend on smartphone sales: CEO

    Tokyo Electron's Toshiki Kawai told CNBC that new technologies such as the so-called Internet of Things, big data and artificial intelligence will drive growth and demand in the semiconductor space.

  • The Internet of Things and big data will drive demand in ...
    CNBC Videos10 months ago

    The Internet of Things and big data will drive demand in ...

    Toshiki Kawai, CEO of Tokyo Electron, says that unlike in the past, the new phase of semiconductor growth will not be determined by the number of smartphones sold.