AAPL Aug 2019 172.500 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
0.0500
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 3:59PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close0.0500
Open0.1000
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0000
Strike172.50
Expire Date2019-08-23
Day's Range0.0500 - 0.1000
Contract RangeN/A
Volume130
Open InterestN/A
  • Masa’s Visionary Sequel Has a Desperate Look
    Bloomberg

    Masa’s Visionary Sequel Has a Desperate Look

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It looks like SoftBank Group Corp.’s Masayoshi Son may be struggling to start his next epic journey.A month after announcing an eclectic mix of investors for its Vision Fund 2, SoftBank is leaning on its own employees for cash, planning to lend them as much as much as $20 billion to buy stakes in the venture-capital vehicle, the Wall Street Journal reported at the weekend. The report adds to signs of possible funding gaps in the $108 billion cash pile Son is targeting. SoftBank itself is already putting in $38 billion.Add the potential contribution from employees, and we’re looking at 54% of the money coming from directly inside the SoftBank family. Son may account for $15 billion of that $20 billion target, the Journal reported. SoftBank is looking to charge staff interest of around 5% and in most cases will require little money down, the newspaper said. That hints at desperation.Encouraging, or even enabling, workers to own stock in their employer isn’t so unusual. Companies do that often, and it’s common practice within the hedge fund industry. There’s an argument to be made for allowing employees to have skin in the game, which then aligns corporate and employee incentives.Yet this doesn’t feel like a simple case of share and share alike. When SoftBank announced the size of Vision Fund 2 on July 27 and listed some of its participants, the lack of an external cornerstone investor stood out. That’s in stark contrast to news of the first Vision Fund back in October 2016. While both press releases spoke of memorandums of understanding, rather than signed pledges, the first incarnation had a clear lead investor – Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund – and a specific figure: $45 billion.The 2016 statement even had a quote from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who’s the chairman of PIF. (This connection now casts a dark shadow over the Vision Fund given Saudi links to the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.) The original Vision Fund later grabbed another $15 billion from Abu Dhabi’s Mubadala Investment Co.So far, however, there’s no big outside name behind the second fund. With the news of loans to employees, it looks like SoftBank itself will take on the cornerstone role. No corporate is likely to pledge more and the only sovereign the July announcement mentioned was Kazakhstan. Beyond that one nation, the investors appear to fall into two categories – industry buddies such as Apple Inc., Microsoft Corp. and long-time friend Foxconn Technology Group – and a collection of Japanese banks. It’s telling that not one of these was quoted or had a dollar amount put against their name. Having two big outside backers and a slew of unicorns to pick from made raising the first fund relatively easy, as I noted previously. The lack of those rich uncles and the slowing pace of unicorn births mean Fund 2 doesn't look quite as compelling.In the end, SoftBank will probably scrape together the money it needs by casting a wider net and calling in favors. The company will use plenty of FOMO (fear of missing out) to try to convince fence-sitters to pull out the checkbook. But when it does get there, I suspect few investors will big as enthused about Son’s latest big adventure as they were for the first. To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Trump's China Trade News Aids Stock Market Rally; Analyzing Apple, These Top Stocks
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Trump's China Trade News Aids Stock Market Rally; Analyzing Apple, These Top Stocks

    Stock futures rose amid President Trump's China trade comments. The choppy stock market rally is hard to handle, with Microsoft and other breakouts struggling. Apple and Zscaler lack bases.

  • Apple CEO warns Trump about China tariffs, Samsung competition
    Reuters

    Apple CEO warns Trump about China tariffs, Samsung competition

    Trump said Cook "made a good case" that tariffs could hurt Apple, given that Samsung's products would not be subject to those same tariffs. Tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, including consumer electronics, are scheduled to go into effect in two stages on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15.

  • Spotify's Unique Podcaster Tools Are a Big Competitive Advantage
    Motley Fool

    Spotify's Unique Podcaster Tools Are a Big Competitive Advantage

    The streaming service's Spotify for Podcasters platform is now open to everyone.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Apple CEO warns Trump about China tariffs, Samsung competition

    President Donald Trump said on Sunday that he had spoken with Apple Inc's Chief Executive Tim Cook about the impact of U.S. tariffs on Chinese imports as well as competition from South Korean company Samsung Electronics Co Ltd. Trump said Cook "made a good case" that tariffs could hurt Apple, given that Samsung's products would not be subject to those same tariffs.

  • MarketWatch

    Tim Cook warns Trump that tariffs on China could hurt Apple

    Apple Inc. Chief Executive Tim Cook warned President Donald Trump at dinner Friday that tariffs could hurt his company, Trump said Sunday. Speaking to reporters before boarding Air Force One in Morristown, N.J., Trump said Cook argued that U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods would give its rival, South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co. , an advantage, since it would not be subject to the same restrictions as Apple. "I thought he made a very compelling argument, so I'm thinking about it," Trump told reporters. Trump has threatened to impose 10% tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese goods scheduled to begin in two stages, on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. Apple shares are up 31% year to date, compared to the S&P 500's 15% gain.

  • Trump Says Apple’s Cook Concerned About Losing Edge to Samsung With Tariffs
    Bloomberg

    Trump Says Apple’s Cook Concerned About Losing Edge to Samsung With Tariffs

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.President Donald Trump said Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook voiced concerns about chief competitor Samsung Electronics getting an edge because its products, unlike Apple’s, won’t be subject to tariffs when imported by the U.S.Cook and Trump had dinner on Friday night, while the president was at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey. Trump described the conversation to reporters as he prepared to travel back to Washington.The majority of Apple’s products are due to be hit with 10% tariffs in the next weeks or months. Levies on the iPhone, iPad, and Apple laptops have been pushed back to Dec. 15, but the tariff hit on the Apple Watch, AirPods, and many accessories is still planned for Sept. 1.Trump said Cook made a “good case” about the difficulty in competing with Samsung if Apple products are subject to import tariffs. “I thought he made a very compelling argument.”Apple will be hit by tariffs because it makes the majority of its devices in China before importing them to the U.S. and other parts of the world.Samsung, however, builds its products across several countries, including Vietnam and South Korea in addition to China. That means their tariff impact will be far less than the impact to Cupertino, California-based Apple.“It’s tough for Apple to pay tariffs if it’s competing with a very good company that’s not,” Trump said.Apple needs to incorporate the cost of tariffs into the cost of goods, while Samsung currently won’t, putting Apple at a competitive disadvantage. Samsung is launching its latest device, the Note 10, later this month, while Apple is planning upgrades to the Apple Watch, iPhone, and its computers for later this year.To contact the reporters on this story: Jennifer Jacobs in Washington at jjacobs68@bloomberg.net;Mark Gurman in San Francisco at mgurman1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Ros Krasny, Matthew G. MillerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple CEO Cook to Meet with President Trump—What’s Next?
    Market Realist

    Apple CEO Cook to Meet with President Trump—What’s Next?

    President Trump tweeted about his plans to meet with Apple (AAPL) CEO Tim Cook. It's possible that they could discuss Apple’s US manufacturing plans.

  • Benzinga

    Bulls And Bears Of The Week: Apple, Cisco, Salesforce, Walmart And More

    Benzinga has examined the prospects for many investor favorite stocks over the past week. Bullish calls included tech leaders and a retail colossus. Bearish calls also included tech giants, as well as ...

  • Apple's 5 Most Profitable Business Regions (AAPL)
    Investopedia

    Apple's 5 Most Profitable Business Regions (AAPL)

    Learn about how Apple generates its profits, breaking down its results by geographic region, with all showing year-over-year improvement.

  • 3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Stocks That Are Cash Cows

    Apple, Amazon, and PayPal are swamped in cash and could swamp your portfolio with great returns.

  • The Surprising Industry the U.S.-China Trade War Could Throttle
    Motley Fool

    The Surprising Industry the U.S.-China Trade War Could Throttle

    This "green" industry could be in big trouble if President Trump gets aggressive with tariffs.

  • Barrons.com

    Harvard University Sold Apple and Facebook Stock — and Bought Alphabet

    Harvard University’s endowment made some bold stock trades in the calendar second quarter. Harvard Management Co., or HMC, the entity that manages the endowment, oversaw $405 million in U.S.-traded equities as of June 30.

  • Apple is going to be the company that kills the wallet
    Quartz

    Apple is going to be the company that kills the wallet

    There's not much left that Apple needs to take out of the physical wallet that isn't already available on the iPhone.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]For Apple Investors, Trump's Unpredictable Trade Policies Have a Silver Lining

    It's created an environment of low expectations for the stock, which trades at a much lower multiple compared to other tech giants.

  • Bloomberg

    Trump’s Dinner Guest on Friday Will Be Apple’s CEO Tim Cook

    (Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly lashed out at technology giants and their leaders, announced on Friday evening that he would be dining with Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook.“Having dinner tonight with Tim Cook of Apple,” Trump, who is staying at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, wrote on Twitter. “They will be spending vast sums of money in the U.S. Great!”He did not elaborate, and Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the meeting.Heads of other major technology companies, including Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. have not fared as well in the president’s tweets and public remarks.He and his political allies have made unsupported claims that social media companies muzzle conservative views. Trump has assailed Amazon for edging out brick-and-mortar retailers and criticized its founder Jeff Bezos, who owns the Washington Post.Pressure on tech companies is increasing in Washington as congressional Republicans examine accusations of bias against conservatives; Democrats in the House conduct an antitrust inquiry and officials at the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission divvy up oversight of Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon.Earlier this week, FTC Chairman Joe Simons said in an interview that he wouldn’t let Trump’s complaints about the size and political inclinations of large technology platforms affect his agency’s decisions.Cook visited the White House in June to discuss the Trump administration’s efforts to develop job training programs that meet the changing demands of U.S. employers. The meeting was part of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, a working group that includes many corporate leaders. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Trump’s daughter and adviser Ivanka Trump unveiled the initiative earlier this year.\--With assistance from Alistair Barr.To contact the reporter on this story: John Harney in Washington at jharney2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kevin Whitelaw at kwhitelaw@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Trump says he is having dinner Friday with Apple CEO Cook

    U.S. President Donald Trump said he was having dinner on Friday with Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook of Apple Inc, a company the president has criticized for not manufacturing more of its products in the United States. The White House did not immediately respond to a question about the agenda for the dinner and what Trump was referring to when he said Apple would be spending vast sums in the United States. Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

  • Sino-US Trade Tension Softens: ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    Sino-US Trade Tension Softens: ETFs in Focus

    We study some ETFs, which might benefit from Trump's latest move to delay tariffs on an array of Chinese imports.

  • Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter

    New positions include David Tepper’s former top holding Micron Technology Continue reading...

  • WeWork IPO: Is The We Company Comparable to Apple?
    Market Realist

    WeWork IPO: Is The We Company Comparable to Apple?

    WeWork is gearing up for an IPO. On Wednesday, the company made its IPO filing with the SEC public and expects to garner $3.5 billion from its IPO.

  • GuruFocus.com

    US Indexes Rally Friday, but Close Lower for the Aug. 16 Week

    S&P; 500 down 1% for the week Continue reading...

  • Dow Jones Finds Crucial Support As Big-Cap Tech Stocks Rally
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Finds Crucial Support As Big-Cap Tech Stocks Rally

    Major indexes rallied in the stock market today to cap a wild week as the Nasdaq and small caps led, and the Dow Jones industrials found key support.

  • Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday
    InvestorPlace

    Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday

    Despite more speculation that recession clouds are gathering, stocks cobbled together impressive gains to close another wild week. I mentioned earlier this week that some of the more important European economies, including Germany, are on the cusp of economic contractions and that are likely to spur the European Central Bank (ECB) into action.That was one catalyst for today's rally: talk that the ECB won't be sitting on the sidelines much longer and will attempt something with monetary policy aimed at perking up the region's sagging economies.Here in the U.S., it still seems like a stretch to say that a recession is imminent, but the University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index reading out today could be cause for concern for fans of President Donald Trump. That survey indicates independent and republican voters are growing concerned about the economy and could be apt to rein in spending. That data point was revealed just a day after the president spoke glowingly about the economy and the strength of the American consumer.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On Even with all the recession chatter, the Nasdaq Composite rallied 1.67% while the S&P 500 climbed 1.44%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed the week with a gain of 1.20%. Fun fact, at least for day traders or those that like volatility: the S&P 500 has had intraday moves of at least 1% for nearly three straight trading weeks. Tariff TalkThese days, it's almost possible to discuss stocks, particularly many of the Dow members, with talking about tariffs. Plenty of stocks are more tariff-sensitive than others, and JPMorgan was talking about a few of those names today.Remember that while President Trump backed off some of the tariffs on Chinese goods set to go into effect on Sept. 1, he did not back off all of those levies. And the ones not going into effect next month were not eliminated. Those were merely delayed until mid-December.As for companies likely to be affected by the Sept.1 tariffs, those names include Dow components Dow (NYSE:DOW) and Caterpillar (NYSE:CAT). Somehow, Dow, the chemicals maker, was the second-best performer in the Dow today while industrial machinery maker Caterpillar was a solid gainer as well, adding 0.97%.Regarding Dow members that could be pinched by the December tariffs, assuming those penalties go into effect, JPMorgan includes Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Nike (NYSE:NKE) on that list. However, both stocks closed higher today.The Home Depot (NYSE:HD) has been receiving elevated trade-related mentions, according to JPMorgan. Still, Home Depot is a heavily domestic company and the shares added 0.92% today ahead of next Tuesday's earnings report. Bad Bank Stocks on the DowEach of the Dow's financial services components, including JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM), the largest U.S. bank, closed higher today. I mention this because, yes, banks are being drilled by declining net interest margin expectations at the hands of lower interest rates, but also because recent price action in the sector confirms investors can be confounded by analyst chatter.Just last week, a Wells Fargo analyst said valuations on bank stocks are attractive, but today the same analyst said "there is no way to sugar coat the negative impact of lower interest rates" on banks' net interest margins and per share earnings.As I pointed out a couple of times during financial services earnings season, the net interest margin issued was raised on a slew of bank earnings calls and at this point, should be baked into these stocks. Dow Jones Bottom LineWith all the aforementioned recession chatter swirling, the good news is that the Federal Reserve will not take that talk lightly and it is becoming increasingly likely that there could be another two rate cuts before the end of this year.While that may be good news, the risk is that with rates already so low by historical standards, the effectiveness of more rate reductions may not be up to investors' current expectations. Time will tell on that front, but the near-term path of least resistance would be for trade wars to cease.Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post Dow Jones Today: A Fantastic Friday appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio: All 47 Buffett Stocks
    Kiplinger

    The Berkshire Hathaway Portfolio: All 47 Buffett Stocks

    When folks think of the Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) portfolio and its collection of holdings, most of which were selected by Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, the companies that most readily come to mind are probably American Express (AXP), Coca-Cola (KO) and, more recently, Apple (AAPL).But a deep dive into Berkshire Hathaway's equity holdings reveals a more complicated picture.Berkshire Hathaway held positions in 47 separate stocks as of June 30, according to the most recent regulatory filing (Aug. 14) with the Securities and Exchange Commission - down from 48 in the first quarter of this year, as he dumped USG Corp. (USG). But the portfolio of "Buffett stocks" isn't as diversified as the number might suggest. In some cases, BRK.B holds more than one share class in the same company. Some holdings are so small as to be immaterial leftovers from earlier bets the Oracle of Omaha has yet to completely exit.And perhaps most importantly, Berkshire Hathaway's equity portfolio is actually pretty concentrated. The top six holdings account for almost 70% of the portfolio's total value. The top 10 positions comprise 80%. Banks and airlines, to cite a couple of sectors, carry quite a load in this portfolio. Then there's the fact that several Buffett stocks actually were picked by portfolio managers Todd Combs and Ted Weschler.Here, we examine each and every holding to give investors a better understanding of the entire Berkshire Hathaway portfolio. SEE ALSO: 50 Top Stocks That Billionaires Love