AAPL Sep 2019 225.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
0.0100
-0.0900 (-90.00%)
As of 3:59PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close0.1000
Open0.3900
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0100
Strike225.00
Expire Date2019-09-20
Day's Range0.1000 - 0.6700
Contract RangeN/A
Volume18,099
Open Interest34.77k
  • iPhone 11 Demand Will Surprise the Street, Analyst Ives Says
    Bloomberg

    iPhone 11 Demand Will Surprise the Street, Analyst Ives Says

    Sep.20 -- Dan Ives, Wedbush Securities analyst, and Bloomberg Businessweek's Max Chafkin discuss consumer enthusiasm over Apple Inc.'s iPhone 11 hitting stores. They speak with Bloomberg's Taylor Riggs on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Netflix winning over Emmy Awards voters, but faces fierce streaming fight
    Yahoo Finance

    Netflix winning over Emmy Awards voters, but faces fierce streaming fight

    It was a wild week in the streaming wars as platforms spent billions of dollars on top content.

  • Bloomberg

    Robot Wolves and Bionic Suits Might Just Save Japan

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- With flashing red eyes and a swiveling head, Yuuji Ohta’s robot wolf bares its white canines and lets out an array of ghastly growls. A matted coat of brown synthetic fur covers its life-size body.  This futuristic creature is part of everyday life for Ohta, president of a company that manufactures machine tools in rural northern Japan. While he started making mechanical wolves as a hobby, the side venture has become a serious business in recent years. As the country’s human population declines, the number of boars, bears, deer, monkeys and other wildlife is rising, encroaching on areas where people live and work. This version of the robot wolf is stationary, but the next will be able to chase animals away.Ohta’s fake wolf illustrates a silver lining of Japan’s demographic retreat – or the potential for a big missed opportunity. The country desperately needs to pour investment into robots and other technology that caters to its aging and diminishing population. The big question is whether Japan can wring out the advantages from the circumstances it faces.By 2050, almost 40% of Japanese people will be over 65, and the population is expected to shrink by about a third in the next five decades. The situation is even more dire in the countryside – including places like Naie, where Ohta has set up shop. The country’s rural population is projected to fall by nearly 20% in just 12 years.This labor shortage has the potential to transform Japan's economy for the better by ushering in a new era of technological advances. Just look at Yoshiyuki Sankai, chief executive officer of Cyberdyne Inc. His company makes a bionic suit, called HAL, to assist elderly people with trouble walking, or those with disabilities caused by stroke or accidents. These robot exoskeletons read bio-electric signals from the patient’s muscles and help them move. Cyberdyne also makes strap-on lumbar-support devices that prolong the working lives of employees in agriculture and construction, as well as robot cleaners that he says are now working the midnight shift at Tokyo's Narita and Haneda airports.“In the near future, Japan will be in a very severe situation,” Sankai said one recent evening at Cyberdyne’s offices in Tsukuba, an industrial research suburb about 90 minutes from central Tokyo. A Pepper android shuffled in the corner of a conference room. “To maintain a society, we need to meet technological challenges.”Japan has had a tough time replicating the success of Sony Corp.’s Walkman some 40 years ago. As innovation started to hit a wall in the late 1990s, Silicon Valley became the “it” place for technology, with the rise of portable computing and Apple Inc.’s iPhone. To its credit, the country remained a leader in the industrial robotics space. Japan is the world’s No. 1 manufacturer in this sector, and sales rose 21% in 2018.But even that edge is slipping, by some measures. Just 10 years ago, Japan had the highest robot density in the world, with 331 industrial robots per 10,000 employees.(1)  In recent years, however, other Asian countries have closed the gap as Japan stalled. Singapore now has a robot density of 831 and South Korea, 774. Japan, meanwhile, comes in at 327, just around where it was in 2009.  A big hurdle is getting money to the right places. Ohta, the robot wolf manufacturer, is fortunate that he had the resources to dabble. Regional banks have become more conservative since the Bank of Japan took interest rates negative, and have little interest in helping, he said. Japan is also proving a tough place for unicorns, as my colleague Nisha Gopalan has written. The country has only a handful of private startups with a valuation of at least $1 billion, according to CBInsights.Robots have long been a fixture of Japanese popular and commercial culture: Astro Boy, an android, first appeared in manga in 1952. That probably helps explain why I met few Japanese who were troubled about jobs being taken from humans, or the idea that machines may one day enslave us. “You mean like the ‘Terminator’ movies? Japanese people aren't so concerned,” said Ohta.The policymakers running Japan’s economy need to be equally open-minded. Regional banks need more, not less help, especially given the emptying of the countryside. Financing greater use of automation that can assist everyday lives ought to be a no-brainer. Humans and machines will soon interact in the same space, if they aren’t already, says Cyberdyne’s Sankai. “This isn't science fiction.” (1) The World Robotics Industrial Robots report, published by the International Federation of Robotics, specifies these are "multipurpose" industrial robots in operation per 10,000 persons employed.To contact the author of this story: Daniel Moss at dmoss@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Daniel Moss is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian economies. Previously he was executive editor of Bloomberg News for global economics, and has led teams in Asia, Europe and North America.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Things are changing at Apple, but the iPhone hype formula stays the same
    MarketWatch

    Things are changing at Apple, but the iPhone hype formula stays the same

    It’s become a late-summer ritual: Lines of consumers snake around Apple Inc.’s retail stores on a Friday in New York, San Francisco and all points in between on the first day a new iPhone is available.

  • Netflix CEO Sees “A Whole New World” of Streaming
    Market Realist

    Netflix CEO Sees “A Whole New World” of Streaming

    Netflix (NFLX) used to dominate the SVOD streaming services market. It was a leader with few competitors and a subscriber base of over 150 million.

  • Kiplinger

    Best and Worst States at Minting Millionaires Since the Financial Crisis

    The 10-year bull market in stocks and longest economic expansion in U.S. history have minted many a millionaire since the darkest days of the Great Recession.A decade ago, less than 1 in 20, or 4.9%, of all U.S. households were considered to be millionaires, according to Phoenix Marketing International, which tracks the affluent market. That means they held at least $1 million in investable assets, such as cash, stocks, bonds and funds, among other types of investments. Real estate such as the family home, employer-sponsored retirement plans and business partnerships don't count.Cut to today, and 6.2% of all U.S. households are millionaires. In raw numbers, the nation's ranks of millionaires grew by more than 2 million over the past 10 years.Naturally, the gains haven't been distributed evenly. Although every state and the District of Columbia has more millionaire households today than it did in 2008, some areas of the country are gaining millionaires as a percentage of total households at a much faster clip than others.Kiplinger.com annually ranks all 50 states plus Washington, D.C., by their respective concentrations of millionaires. In the most recent tally, New Jersey leapfrogged long-time leader Maryland for the top spot. Nearly 9% of New Jersey households are millionaires vs. 8.9% for Maryland, which led the country in millionaires as a percentage of households from 2011 through 2017 before slipping to fourth place.That got us thinking: How have state millionaire concentrations shifted since the financial crisis? Here, we look at the five best states that have risen through the millionaire rankings since the Great Recession ... and the five that have experienced the biggest dropoffs. SEE ALSO: 25 Small Towns With Big Millionaire Populations

  • TheStreet.com

    Apple Arcade Feels a Bit Like Streaming Services in Their Early Days

    Apple's game-subscription service doesn't have many big-budget titles for now. But it's priced aggressively, has some quality titles and comes without ads or in-game purchases.

  • Trump, China Bring the Trade War Back, Stocks Crash
    Market Realist

    Trump, China Bring the Trade War Back, Stocks Crash

    The Chinese delegation canceled planned goodwill visits to US farms because of trade war escalations. This affected markets yesterday.

  • Tech stocks face a 10% drop in the near-term, warns investor who once ran the world’s biggest technology fund
    MarketWatch

    Tech stocks face a 10% drop in the near-term, warns investor who once ran the world’s biggest technology fund

    While investors sift through the aftermath of the weekend attack that disrupted Saudi Arabia’s crude output, the Wall Street veteran who ran the world’s biggest tech fund during the dot-com days issued a stark warning for those looking to hitch their ride to the continued leadership of the tech sector. A near-term correction is “inevitable,” Paul Meeks says.

  • Apple’s new iPhone 11s mean the two-year upgrade cycle is officially dead
    MarketWatch

    Apple’s new iPhone 11s mean the two-year upgrade cycle is officially dead

    Apple Inc.’s new iPhones have great cameras and battery life, but the key question remains whether consumers will deem them worth an upgrade.

  • Roku’s stock rocked as analyst asks, ‘Is Roku broku?’
    MarketWatch

    Roku’s stock rocked as analyst asks, ‘Is Roku broku?’

    Shares of Roku Inc. plunged Friday, putting them on track for their worst-ever weekly performance, as investors continued to express concern over increasing competition and an extreme valuation.

  • Barrons.com

    Here’s What Reviewers Are Saying About Apple’s 3 New iPhones

    BARRONS NEXT HOT STOCKS Apple’s newest iPhones are here. Should you buy one? That is what reviewers have asked since the company announced the (AAPL) (ticker: AAPL) iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max—which start at $699, $999, and $1,099, respectively—earlier this month.

  • Apple Puts Up Fight, But FANG Internet Giants Are MIA In Stock Market Rally
    Investor's Business Daily

    Apple Puts Up Fight, But FANG Internet Giants Are MIA In Stock Market Rally

    Apple is fighting at a buy point, but Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google have been MIA in the current stock market rally.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-U.S. trade regulators approve some Apple tariff exemptions amid broader reprieve

    U.S. trade regulators on Friday approved 10 out of 15 requests for tariff exemptions filed by Apple Inc amid a broader reprieve on levies on computer parts, according to a public docket published by the U.S. Trade Representative and a Federal Register notice. The move by U.S. officials could make it easier for both Apple and small makers of gaming computers to assemble devices in the United States by lowering the costs of importing parts. Apple did not say why it requested the exemptions, but the requests were for components such as partially completed circuit boards.

  • If You Had Invested Right After Apple's IPO
    Investopedia

    If You Had Invested Right After Apple's IPO

    If you had purchased 10 shares of Apple at its IPO price of $220, you would be looking at a payoff of over $100,000. Here's a breakdown of the company's growth and stock splits.

  • U.S. trade regulators approve some Apple tariff exemptions amid broader reprieve
    Reuters

    U.S. trade regulators approve some Apple tariff exemptions amid broader reprieve

    The move by U.S. officials could make it easier for both Apple and small makers of gaming computers to assemble devices in the United States by lowering the costs of importing parts. Apple did not say why it requested the exemptions, but the requests were for components such as partially completed circuit boards. Apple manufactures its Mac Pro computers in Texas, making the machine immune from tariffs, but such intermediate parts were subject to the levies.

  • ETFs in Focus as Netflix Bags Global Rights for Seinfeld
    Zacks

    ETFs in Focus as Netflix Bags Global Rights for Seinfeld

    Netflix boosts its content portfolio with the new show. We highlight the ETFs that can gain from this move.

  • Apple’s Mac Pro Tariff Relief Requests Approved Despite Trump Opposition
    Bloomberg

    Apple’s Mac Pro Tariff Relief Requests Approved Despite Trump Opposition

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. gained U.S. approval to avoid tariffs on Chinese imports for the upcoming Mac Pro computer, even though President Donald Trump indicated the company’s waiver requests would be rejected.Ten of Apple’s 15 requests for exclusions from 25% duties have been approved, according to the U.S. Trade Representative’s office. Customs and Border Protection determined it can administer the waiver from the levies when the goods enter the U.S. On Thursday, Apple’s request to win exemptions for the components had moved to an advanced stage in the approval process.Trump had signaled that relief from tariffs would be rejected, saying in a July 26 tweet that “Apple will not be given Tariff waiver, or relief, for Mac Pro parts that are made in China. Make them in the USA, no Tariffs!”But the president later told reporters “we’ll work it out” and that “I think they’re going to announce they’re going to build a plant in Texas.”Bloomberg reported in June that Apple was shifting production of its new Mac Pro to China from a facility in Texas. The Cupertino, California-based company hasn’t suggested there are plans for new factories in the state, though Apple has said it will expand its local headquarters there.Apple’s requests involved goods that are part of $200 billion in Chinese products hit with tariffs last September. Trump increased the duty on that batch to 25% from 10% in May. The rate is due to rise to 30% on Oct. 15, including on another $50 billion of goods also hit last year.Trump ordered duties on about $300 billion of essentially all remaining Chinese imports starting Sept. 1, but he delayed imposition on some consumer products until Dec. 15. Apple has said those duties would affect nearly all of its major products, including iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, Apple Watches, AirPods and the iMac.Apple had so far asked for exclusions on Mac Pro parts and accessories, as well as its Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad. Requests for tariff relief for the overall exterior enclosure, the Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad and some key internal components for the Mac Pro have been approved, while requests for wheels and other components are still under a substantive review by the USTR.Exclusion decisions are based on whether a product is available only from China, is strategically important or related to Chinese industrial programs, and whether duties will “cause severe economic harm” to the company or U.S. interests, the USTR has said.In its 15 requests for exclusions posted July 18, Apple said the devices or components are not related to Chinese industrial programs -- and that “there are no other sources for this proprietary, Apple-designed component.”To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Niquette in Columbus at mniquette@bloomberg.net;Mark Gurman in San Francisco at mgurman1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Mark MilianFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Friday Apple Rumors: iPhone 11 Pro Max Contains Bilateral Charging Components
    InvestorPlace

    Friday Apple Rumors: iPhone 11 Pro Max Contains Bilateral Charging Components

    Leading the Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) rumor mill today is news of what's inside the iPhone 11 Pro Max. Today, we'll look at that and other Apple Rumors for Friday.Source: Mykola Churpita / Shutterstock.com iPhone 11 Pro Max Teardown: A teardown of the iPhone 11 Pro Max shows off the components inside the smartphone, reports MacRumors. The most interesting thing found inside the iPhone has to do with bilateral charging, which could let users charge other devices with the iPhone. This includes components inside the device that would possibly allowing for this feature. However, users can't make use of these components yet. Despite this, it's possible a future update may allow for bilateral charging.Smart Battery Case: Apple may be planning to release smart battery cases for the iPhone 11 line, 9to5Mac notes. Speculation around such cases comes after details for them were found in iOS 13 code. This code suggests that smart battery cases for all three iPhone 11 models may be on the way. Now we just have to wait and see when, and if, AAPL will release them.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipstvOS 13 GM: Apple is sending out the tvOS 13 GM beta to developers, reports AppleInsider. This version of tvOS 13 is the final one made available to testers before the official launch takes place. The "GM" in the name stands for gold master. Unless a horrible bug is found, this version of tvOS 13 is likely what will come out to the public later this month.Subscribe to Apple Rumors As of this writing, William White did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities.The post Friday Apple Rumors: iPhone 11 Pro Max Contains Bilateral Charging Components appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Apple Stock Gets Price-Target Hike As iPhone 11 Goes On Sale
    Investor's Business Daily

    Apple Stock Gets Price-Target Hike As iPhone 11 Goes On Sale

    A Wall Street analyst raised his price target on Apple stock amid indications of better-than-expected initial sales of iPhone 11 series handsets. Apple started selling the new phones Friday.

  • Value Screeners Identify Opportunities Ahead of 4th Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Value Screeners Identify Opportunities Ahead of 4th Quarter

    A look at the global value screener record in light of Apple’s iPhone 11 launch Continue reading...

  • Apple’s New iPhones Show Signs of Demand; New Store Draws Crowds
    Bloomberg

    Apple’s New iPhones Show Signs of Demand; New Store Draws Crowds

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc.’s latest iPhone models hit the stores on Friday, in a test of whether better cameras and longer battery life will be enough to lure buyers ahead of a much bigger redesign next year.The new line of hardware, including three new phones and an updated Apple Watch and iPads, was introduced on Sept. 10 and customers were able to place preorders last week to either be delivered or picked up in stores today. Long lines snaked around Apple’s flagship on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan as people waited to get in to the gleaming glass cube and descend to the underground space, which as been under renovation for two years and emerged Friday bigger and brighter. Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook was on site for the opening and stood out on the store’s plaza across from Central Park taking selfies with fans.Sam Sheffer had already picked up his green iPhone 11 Pro in Manhattan’s SoHo store Friday morning, waiting in line for less than five minutes. But he went uptown to see the new store and potentially get a glimpse of Cook.“For me, a die-hard enthusiast, I wouldn’t be able to live knowing there was an iPhone I didn’t have,” Sheffer said.Apple shares declined 1.5% to close at $217.73, valuing the company at almost $984 billion.Apple’s latest iPhone faced some hurdles heading in to its annual revamp. Sales of the iconic smartphone have declined in the past three quarters, as prices crept above $1,000 and people hung on to their current models longer. A lack of revolutionary features on this year’s model could keep some fans holding out until 2020, when significantly faster 5G networks and a revamped design will open up new possibilities with the phone. At the same time, a trade war between the U.S. and China is also starting to take a toll.But some early reports from analysts pointed to encouraging signs for Apple. “Demand looks strong out of the gates for Apple as the lines at its flagship NYC store were up about 70% today compared to what we saw last year,” Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities wrote in a note to investors. Having talked to customers in line, Ives said there was “strong demand for the base iPhone 11 as well as the 256GB iPhone 11 Pro in both the space grey and gold colors.” Ives said another positive sign for Cupertino, California-based Apple is that the lines were “unwavering into the afternoon.”Apple set the base model price at $699 for the iPhone 11, down from the iPhone XR’s $749 price last year and below some analysts’ expectations. That might help attract some first-time buyers to its expanding entertainment and services ecosystem.Rosenblatt Securities Inc. said it’s seeing “some new model production increases for September and October for the new iPhone models.” Jun Zhang, an analyst at Rosenblatt, wrote that the firm now sees volume increasing by 3 million to 5 million units more than earlier expectations, to 68 million to 70 million units.It may come as a disappointment to those waiting on line on Fifth Avenue, but if they haven’t preordered their phone, they could face a two-to-three week wait, according to Zhang. That’s a longer wait time than the one-to-two weeks for last year’s iPhone XR, but, “there is a lot of inventory at other retailers,” Zhang said.Longbow Research analyst Shawn Harrison said Apple could be seeing a “potential higher floor in iPhone demand,” and that “initial iPhone search trends are positively surprising.”Lines outside Apple stores around the world were typically shorter or non-existent this year, but tourists and customers thronged the Fifth Avenue location. Daniel Akinsulire found himself stuck deep in line on 58th Street, waiting to pick up phones for his family. “I didn’t know it would be this packed,” he said. “I might be late for work.”(Updates with analyst comment in seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Molly Schuetz in New York at mschuetz9@bloomberg.net;Kiley Roache in New York at kroache@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Robin AjelloFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Wall Street Is Excited About Long Lines for the iPhone 11. Here’s the Problem.

    It’s tough to evaluate demand for Apple’s newest smartphones relative to last year because the release schedule this year was different.

  • Evercore Remains Bullish on Alphabet Stock as Antitrust Threat May Prove Less Than Feared
    TipRanks

    Evercore Remains Bullish on Alphabet Stock as Antitrust Threat May Prove Less Than Feared

    To help aid its investigation into Big Tech, investigators from the House Judiciary Committee last week wrote to Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google, Apple (AAPL) and Amazon (AMZN), requesting documents which they believe will help provide information on whether these companies have broken any laws. Primarily, the committee is looking into whether Big Tech practices are harming customers or violating antitrust law, but are not necessarily looking into privacy (as other bodies are).When it comes to Google, the House is looking into a wide-range of antitrust concerns, including 25 businesses within the company. While the scope is large, Evercore's Kevin Rippey is not too concerned as “only four of these areas of concern relate to the core search business,” which represents about 75% of the enterprise value.As a result, Rippey maintains an Outperform rating on GOOGL stock, with a $1,350 price target, which implies about 10% upside from current levels. (To watch Rippey's track record, click here)"So long as the House’s efforts are focused on businesses other than Search, the magnitude of material financial risk may prove less than feared," Rippey opined. "The Committee seems more focused on the company’s ad tech complex...as well as the sharing of data between the Chrome, Android, Cloud, and advertising business lines.” Chrome will be a priority for the Committee, as it mentioned the browser four times in letter to the company. Besides Chrome, Rippey believes “Android and the app store remain areas of vulnerability.” Given the app store’s "monopoly control over app distribution,” Rippey thinks that app stores “are a key area of vulnerability under existing anti-trust law.” For better or worse, this is not Google’s first time in an antitrust investigation. Last year, the company was fined $5 billion by the European Commission for Android-related antitrust violations. And with Big Tech is routinely and increasing receiving negative attention from presidential candidates in the Democratic party, this investigation is surely not the end of regulators’ focus on the tech giant. But like other tech companies, Alphabet stock continues to be one of Wall Street's favorites. TipRanks analysis of 33 analysts ratings on the stock shows a consensus Strong Buy, with 29 analysts rating the stock a Buy and four who giving it a Hold. The average price target among these analysts stand at $1,404.22, representing a 14% upside from current levels. (See GOOGL's price targets and analyst ratings on TipRanks)