AC.PA - Accor SA

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
26.65
+0.51 (+1.95%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close26.14
Open26.44
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range26.28 - 27.22
52 Week Range20.15 - 42.58
Volume1,582,876
Avg. Volume1,780,496
Market Cap6.232B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.18
PE Ratio (TTM)17.17
EPS (TTM)1.55
Earnings DateJul 29, 2020 - Aug 03, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 10, 2019
1y Target Est49.50
  • An Intrinsic Calculation For Accor SA (EPA:AC) Suggests It's 29% Undervalued
    Simply Wall St.

    An Intrinsic Calculation For Accor SA (EPA:AC) Suggests It's 29% Undervalued

    Does the May share price for Accor SA (EPA:AC) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we will estimate the stock's...

  • We'll All Be Renting a Local Airbnb This Summer
    Bloomberg

    We'll All Be Renting a Local Airbnb This Summer

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In Whitstable, a British seaside town just over an hour’s drive from London, every day of the last two weeks has been like a busy summer weekend. Britons may be unable or unwilling to take international flights, but with the first easing of lockdown restrictions, they are more than happy to head to the beach to bask in the sun and eat fish and chips from the only restaurants open for now.Optimism that people everywhere will be eager to wander once travel restrictions end drove a rebound in airline and tour-operator stocks this week. But these hopes may be overdone. Lingering health-safety concerns and uncertainty about which borders will open mean many consumers on both sides of the Atlantic will stick close to home this summer.What’s more, they may favor a remote Airbnb rental instead of staying in a hotel, with the increased chances of running into other people in the lobby, elevator or restaurant. Globally, new bookings at Airbnb Inc. and Expedia Group Inc.’s Vrbo more than doubled from 916,000 in the week of April 5 to 2.08 million in the week of May 18, according to AirDNA, a short-term rental data provider.While the home-sharing site Airbnb has been hit hard by the travel trough, it said domestic bookings rose strongly in China, Korea, the Netherlands and Denmark in April, and they’ve increased significantly in Germany since the beginning of May. More telling, Chief Executive Officer Brian Chesky told the Associated Press that 30% of bookings are currently within a 50-mile radius of people’s own homes —  basically the next town over — up from 13% before the novel coronavirus outbreak, a trend he attributes to people’s aversion to flying for now.Areas that tourists can drive to, and classic local vacation spots, such as the mountains, lakes and beaches, are proving resilient.Take Germany, a country known for exporting summer tourists. Short-term rentals in the North Sea coastal district of Nordfriesland, which includes the island of Sylt, enjoyed an almost 800% increase in bookings between March 22 and May 17, according to AirDNA. And it’s unlikely they’re coming from abroad — in general just 16% of visitors are from outside Germany. By contrast, Berlin, a popular destination for foreign visitors, has seen just a 71% increase.It’s a similar picture in the U.S, where rentals near beaches in Alabama, Texas, Georgia and the Carolinas are proving popular. By contrast, cities such as New York and San Francisco are recovering more slowly. In this Covid-19 crisis, home-rental sites tend to have an advantage. For example, the majority of Airbnb hosts are in less populated areas, while most hotel chains have a bigger presence in cities. Some of the lodging giants have also ventured into the holiday rental market. Four years ago, French hotel giant Accor SA acquired Onefinestay, an upmarket competitor to Airbnb. One potential drawback with private rentals during the pandemic is that guests have to trust hosts are cleaning and disinfecting well. Hotel groups including Accor, Marriott International Inc., Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc. and InterContinental Hotels Group Plc have announced stringent hygiene standards.Airbnb has responded with its own guidelines developed with former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, including advice on personal protective equipment and disinfectants. Hosts who sign up can leave their properties empty for just 24 hours between guests. Otherwise, they must respect a 72-hour “booking buffer.”For other people, getting away from home may mean taking their lodging with them. Provisional bookings at caravan and campsites in the U.K. look promising. In the U.S., there’s been a bump in demand for motor homes. Indeed, road trips may be one of the first holidays taken on both sides of the Atlantic.While all this pent-up demand is a good sign, it’s unlikely all the money usually spent on overseas travel will be recouped. Staycations aren’t really conducive to flagrant discretionary spending in normal times, but the coronavirus outbreak and lockdowns has brought job losses and economic hardship as well. That will eat into outlay. For a gauge of comparison, in 2017, the year after Britain voted to leave the European Union, the decline in the pound meant many people avoided international travel, but only 60% of what would have been spent abroad was redirected to the U.K., according to analysts at Bernstein.With this crisis, the effect could be even more extreme if shops have to restrict the number of patrons, local tourist attractions can’t open or people remain nervous about going to restaurants or bars even with all of the necessary social distancing measures in place.Indeed, although Whitstable Holiday Homes, an agency for 39 houses, is enjoying its usual high level of bookings for July and August, further out, customers are waiting. A crucial consideration will be whether the town’s vibrant eateries will be open alongside the fish-and-chip shops.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    MORNING BID-There's no present, only the future

    European shares have opened 1.8% higher, S&P500 is tipped to rise and Chinese shares have seized on signs of house price recovery and promises of more central bank stimulus to post their best gain in six trading days. All six European countries have lifted short-selling bans imposed during the selloff. Clearly, rather than look at reported data and company earnings, people are focusing squarely on what lies ahead beyond the second quarter – betting on resumption of economic activity, a pick-up in manufacturing, trade and driving.

  • Reuters

    Check-up after check-in: Accor bets on online medicine for hotel rebound

    France's Accor, which runs hotels such as Ibis and Movenpick, said on Friday it would offer its clients free access to online medical consultations run by insurer AXA as it prepares for a recovery from the coronavirus crisis. France's tourism sector, which accounts for almost 8% of economic output, has been hammered by the pandemic, although companies are implementing schemes to encourage people to eventually return. Accor and Axa said in a statement that their programme would be operational from July.

  • Reuters

    Accor real estate arm in talks for French government-backed loan -media

    AccorInvest, the real estate arm of French hotel group Accor, is in talks with several banks over a 400 to 500 million euro ($544 million) government-guaranteed loan, according to BFM Business. In return for the loan, banks will ask AccorInvest to commit to rebalancing its accounts by the end of the year via a capital increase to be subscribed notably by Accor and by U.S. real estate and investment firm Colony Capital. "There is no capital increase in the cards at this stage," Accor said, without commenting whether its unit was negotiating a loan.

  • Time To Worry? Analysts Just Downgraded Their Accor SA (EPA:AC) Outlook
    Simply Wall St.

    Time To Worry? Analysts Just Downgraded Their Accor SA (EPA:AC) Outlook

    One thing we could say about the analysts on Accor SA (EPA:AC) - they aren't optimistic, having just made a major...

  • How Much Did Accor SA's (EPA:AC) CEO Pocket Last Year?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Much Did Accor SA's (EPA:AC) CEO Pocket Last Year?

    In 2013, Sébastien Bazin was appointed CEO of Accor SA (EPA:AC). This report will, first, examine the CEO compensation...

  • We’re All Going on a Winter Holiday
    Bloomberg

    We’re All Going on a Winter Holiday

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Anyone up for a beach holiday right now? The answer is probably a resounding yes, anything to escape lockdown and incessant worrying about the coronavirus outbreak and imminent global recession.But would you actually book one for this summer or even the fall? There the answer is more complicated, as it becomes painfully clear that our next vacations will be close to home and overshadowed by concerns about health precautions.There are the optimists: Almost three-quarters of the people who were due to sail in May, but had their dream cruise canceled by British operator Saga Plc, chose to rebook at a later date. The pessimists: More than half of Americans surveyed by Destination Analysts agreed their next vacation would be a “staycation.” Those organized souls who planned their July Fourth escapes before Covid-19 was upon us are playing wait-and-see. French hotel giant Accor SA has seen less than 10% of reservations for July and August scrapped. But it’s still bracing for occupancy rates of 25-30%, as opposed to 75%, when travel begins againWhat’s clear is that we’re all going to be expecting something different for our next getaway: hotels with detailed Covid-19 symptom checks, abundant hand sanitizer, rigorous disinfecting and bars and restaurants configured for social distancing.The $5 trillion global tourism industry has already taken a huge hit from the pandemic, and it’s not over. Figuring out how to cater to tourists and business travelers in this new era will throw up huge challenges for even the most flexible and deep-pocketed companies. The about 35% gain in the Stoxx 600 Travel & Leisure Index since March 18 looks overly optimistic.In the near term, consumers may be reluctant to crowd into airplanes or return to busy tourist hot spots. In response, European discount carrier EasyJet Plc said it’s likely to leave middle seats empty on aircraft with a three-seat configuration, at least when it first resumes flights. The cruise industry, a haunting symbol of the Covid-19 outbreak, is likely to promote smaller vessels, which are more easily adapted to social distancing, a robust on-board medical staff and promises to fly holidaymakers home at the first whiff of a problem. Flexible booking policies without any deposit may become the norm. If all this fails to tempt, then deep discounts will be necessary.This season may be a washout but there are some signs things will pick back up. Dart Group Plc said on Friday that bookings were still coming in to its Jet2 leisure travel business for late summer. EasyJet said winter bookings were significantly ahead of this time last year. Even if some of this may be rescheduling of trips that were canceled, it illustrates people’s eagerness to travel once again. To capture pent-up demand, tour operators including European giant TUI AG and Jet2 have launched their 2021 summer holiday programs early.It may still be a hard sell depending on the destination. For Italy, Spain and France, as well as New York City, the repercussions of having been the epicenter of the pandemic at some point may linger even longer. It took about 18 months for travel to Paris to recover completely after the harrowing 2015 terrorist attacks.With international flights grounded and foreign tourists unwelcome in most places, it’s impossible to say how soon we can start trotting the globe again. The big luxury and event-oriented hotels, such as those operated by Marriott International Inc. and Hyatt Hotels Corp., are more dependent on international travelers than their more downmarket peers. Companies will likely shore up offerings for domestic tourists. For example, Saga, which caters to the 50s-and-over crowd, already offers cruises around the British isles. This business could be expanded if customers are nervous about venturing further afield. In more thrifty times, people tend to seek out no-frills lodging. In the U.S., Wyndham Hotels & Resorts Inc., has the most exposure to the economy and mid-scale sectors, with brands such as Super 8, Ramada and Days Inn, according to Brian Egger, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. In Europe, Whitbread Plc has the Premier Inn chain in Germany and the U.K., where 80% of its properties are outside of London.Airbnb Inc. may be a big beneficiary if tourists seek out private residences to avoid mingling with too many people in hotel lobbies, elevators or restaurants. The trailblazer for the sharing economy may provide more options in smaller towns or isolated regions. But as with hotels, people must have confidence in hosts’ hygiene standards.And as I have noted, some sectors, such as cruising, may struggle to attract customers other than their most ardent devotees. Carnival Corp., operator of the now infamous Grand Princess, said that as of March 15 bookings were down even for the first half of 2021. It’s hard to say just how bad and enduring the impact from this new coronavirus will be. For those companies that manage to adjust, they can expect to be rewarded with some positive long-term prospects, as more people enter the middle class around the world and an aging population has more leisure time. But it will take much more than pictures of idyllic getaways to woo them.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Some Accor hotels to admit mild coronavirus cases in Paris region
    Reuters

    Some Accor hotels to admit mild coronavirus cases in Paris region

    French hotel group Accor <ACCP.PA> said that some of its hotels in the Paris region will open on Thursday to people infected with the coronavirus who are symptom-free or showing slight symptoms. Chief Executive Sebastien Bazin also told France Inter radio that 300 of Accor's hotels in France had indicated they were prepared to participate in the initiative, which comes as President Emmanuel Macron has indicated the country's lockdown could be progressively lifted from May 11.

  • France's Accor, Airbnb help provide rooms for medics during crisis
    Reuters

    France's Accor, Airbnb help provide rooms for medics during crisis

    French hotel group Accor <ACCP.PA> and home rental company Airbnb are launching online services to help medical staff fighting the coronavirus epidemic in France find emergency housing. Europe's largest hotel group said on Tuesday it had created CEDA, a platform to centralize housing needs and offer housing and was also working with the government to offer up to 2,000 beds in 40 hotels across France for the homeless.

  • Is Accor SA's (EPA:AC) 6.7% ROE Better Than Average?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Accor SA's (EPA:AC) 6.7% ROE Better Than Average?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • How Travel Companies Themselves Are Taking Coronavirus Precautions
    Skift

    How Travel Companies Themselves Are Taking Coronavirus Precautions

    On March 2, an employee at Travel Republic, a large online travel agency based in the UK and owned by Dnata, tested positive for coronavirus. The company acted swiftly, closing the office the following morning, undertaking a deep clean, and implementing flexible working arrangements for staff. A day later the office reopened. “Staff have been […]

  • Abandoned Hong Kong Hotels Go Into Survival Mode as Virus Fallout Spreads
    Skift

    Abandoned Hong Kong Hotels Go Into Survival Mode as Virus Fallout Spreads

    Hong Kong hotels these days are feeling forsaken not just by guests but government, which excluded them from a $4 billion (HK$30 billion) coronavirus relief package announced last week. Comparisons with Singapore add salt to the wound, with the Lion City seen as more empathetic towards hotels’ plight and more forward thinking. The Federation of […]

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of AC.PA earnings conference call or presentation 20-Feb-20 7:30am GMT

    Full Year 2019 Accor SA Earnings Presentation

  • When Should You Buy Accor SA (EPA:AC)?
    Simply Wall St.

    When Should You Buy Accor SA (EPA:AC)?

    Accor SA (EPA:AC) received a lot of attention from a substantial price movement on the ENXTPA over the last few...

  • Visa (V) and Accor Form Partnership to Launch Payment Card
    Zacks

    Visa (V) and Accor Form Partnership to Launch Payment Card

    Visa (V) enters into a partnership with Accor to bring new payment experiences to the ALL loyalty members.

  • Reuters

    RPT-GRAPHIC-Why the 'devil' coronavirus has hit European stocks hard

    A whopping $200 billion was wiped from European stocks at the start of this week as the deadly coronavirus prompted investors to cut back exposure to companies with a strong presence in China, the world's fastest-growing consumer market. Hundreds of millions of people have been preparing to travel for the Chinese holidays, stoking concerns infection rates may accelerate during the period - which is also a peak retail season in China and overseas. The virus - which Chinese President Xi Jinping has described as a "devil" - has had a bigger impact on European companies than their U.S. peers due to their high revenue exposure to China.

  • Reuters

    GRAPHIC-Why the 'devil' coronavirus has hit European stocks hard

    A whopping $200 billion was wiped from European stocks at the start of this week as the deadly coronavirus prompted investors to cut back exposure to companies with a strong presence in China, the world's fastest-growing consumer market. Hundreds of millions of people have been preparing to travel for the Chinese holidays, stoking concerns infection rates may accelerate during the period - which is also a peak retail season in China and overseas. The virus - which Chinese President Xi Jinping has described as a "devil" - has had a bigger impact on European companies than their U.S. peers due to their high revenue exposure to China.

  • Is Accor SA’s (EPA:AC) Return On Capital Employed Any Good?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Accor SA’s (EPA:AC) Return On Capital Employed Any Good?

    Today we'll evaluate Accor SA (EPA:AC) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment idea. To be...

  • Sabre announces plans with Accor to create the first unified technology platform for the global hospitality industry
    PR Newswire

    Sabre announces plans with Accor to create the first unified technology platform for the global hospitality industry

    Sabre Corporation (NASDAQ: SABR), the leading software and technology company powering the global travel industry, and Accor, the world-leading augmented hospitality group offering unique experiences in more than 5000 hotels and residences across 110 destinations, today announced that they intend to create the first unified central reservation (CR) and property management (PM) platform for the global hospitality industry.

  • If You Had Bought Accor (EPA:AC) Shares Three Years Ago You'd Have Made 17%
    Simply Wall St.

    If You Had Bought Accor (EPA:AC) Shares Three Years Ago You'd Have Made 17%

    Buying a low-cost index fund will get you the average market return. But in any diversified portfolio of stocks...

  • Accor Sells Half of Its Stake in Huazhu as Chinese Partner Eyes Europe
    Skift

    Accor Sells Half of Its Stake in Huazhu as Chinese Partner Eyes Europe

    Accor is selling half its stake in Huazhu Group, its strategic partner in China, for $451 million. It will retain a 5.8 percent stake in the Nasdaq-listed multi-brand Chinese hotel company, which last month entered into an agreement to buy Frankfurt-based Deutsche Hospitality for about $777 million (700 million euros). A statement from Accor said […]

  • Is Accor SA (EPA:AC) A Great Dividend Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Accor SA (EPA:AC) A Great Dividend Stock?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Accor SA (EPA:AC) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a strong business...

  • An Intrinsic Calculation For Accor SA (EPA:AC) Suggests It's 35% Undervalued
    Simply Wall St.

    An Intrinsic Calculation For Accor SA (EPA:AC) Suggests It's 35% Undervalued

    How far off is Accor SA (EPA:AC) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll take a look at...

  • Accor CEO to Doubters in Asia: Our Brand-Heavy Strategy Is Working
    Skift

    Accor CEO to Doubters in Asia: Our Brand-Heavy Strategy Is Working

    Here’s a quick test: Which global hotel chain has the most number of brands? Most people would probably say Marriott International after it acquired Starwood Hotels & Resorts. But Accor actually has more brands than Marriott today, thanks to its acquisitive CEO Sébastien Bazin, who has also encouraged the birth of new Accor brands, the […]