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AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (AGE)

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1.7800-0.0400 (-2.20%)
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  • B
    Bob
    Anyone feel a new sense of urgency and purpose in the Letter to Shareholders this year? Here are the time sensitive items I noticed:

    (1) We are positioning Reverse Bio to be a leader in 2021.
    (2) In 2021, we are aiming to work to generate proof-of-concept animal data for both BAT1 and VASC1 through outside collaborations.
    (3) The (iTR) money will be used for a proof-of-concept trial in an animal model as quickly as possible.
    (4) Once financed we plan to advance our iTR™ technology to proof of concept within 12 months, we are gaining significant momentum and are excited for the potential of Reverse Bio.
    (5) To augment growth, we will also look for accretive acquisition opportunities that would substantially increase shareholder value, and make our product offering even more robust, like the UniverCyte™ acquisition we made in 2018, and get us into the clinic and human trials as soon as possible.
    (6) In the last two years, we have had growing pains but we feel that 2021 will see the results of our two-year efforts with significant readouts on two major proofs of concepts in cell therapy with UniverCyte™ and in iTR™ proof of concepts in animals and the success of our licensing initiatives.
  • P
    Peter
    The market is its old charming self again. Reacting to nothing, but not reacting to something. Whatever... But the letter didn’t really contain anything, that would call for an immediate reaction.
  • B
    Bob
    With VASC-1 and BAT-1 to be developed through outside collaborations, that just leaves iTR as virtually the only item still not explicitly being shifted off-site. It sounds like our new Reverse Bio CEO will be explaining the technology to financial investors, as they are to work on "fund raising." So my first thought is AGE is going to self-fund the iTR animal study, and not partner with anyone quite yet. Anyone know where animal studies are typically conducted, and whether those groups are typically dealt in a share in the project, or if they are just a fee-for-service?
  • B
    Bob
    Given the high volume pops and drops this year, I'm pleased to see AGE climb lately on low volume! I can't quite figure exactly what changed for AGE to allow it to hold up so well since it launched over $1.00 six weeks ago. I can see where investors might like the fact that JUV is re-working conditions so they can acquire even more shares of AGE to increase their ownership stake in AGE. But otherwise, there hasn't been much progress of note for some time now. It does make me wonder if we might just find something out in a Letter to Shareholders this month or in the Annual Shareholders Meeting at the end of December. That said, I don't want to read too much into the recent price action. Until AGE shows its cards, my working assumption is the stock will remain a market plaything.
  • F
    Felix
    David Sinclair says the study in which his lab reversed aging and induced regeneration in the eyes of mice will be officially published next month. He says they have been treating mice for 15 months and see no signs of anything going wrong, and they expect to be in human trials in 2 years, maybe sooner. I’d imagine AgeX doesn’t want to be running too far behind that timeline. Sinclair says the challenge is delivering the reprogramming genes evenly; they mostly end up in the liver. He thinks this will be sorted out, but the big breakthrough will be getting this treatment as a pill rather than a gene therapy. “There are a few labs in the world that are working on that, including mine.” I wonder if iTR-1547, being a small molecule drug, could be delivered this way?

    Source: “Why We Age — and Why We Don’t Have To — A conversation with David Sinclair” from Marco Montemagno on YouTube
  • P
    Peter
    The Unity / AgeX-ratio is 4.9 : 1 today.
  • P
    Peter
    @Bob

    I‘ve been thinking. If you participate in the meeting, perhaps you could ask West, if he‘s considered, bringing his work to the attention of the next POTUS. Aside from a theoretically unlimited source of funding, if they at least convinced the administration, to order the FDA, to recognize aging as a therapeutic target, that could come a long way to emerging from under the radar. I‘m not sure, who would have that kind of authority, if the FDA doesn’t act on its own volition, but I would assume, that the government has some influence. I‘d also like to know, if he‘s ready to move this work to the first country, that recognizes aging, provided it‘s a country, that provides a sufficiently sophisticated environment. If the FDA doesn’t come over the fence, that might become necessary.
  • P
    PAR75
    Think the whole "stem cell" sector is gaining more attention. This is only good news for the "little," emerging, cell therapeutic 2.0 companies like LCTX and AGE. I mean, Mesoblast compared to the previously mentioned is comparing horse and buggy to automobiles. Patience will payoff big time here....and were not even considering iTR here. https://themarketherald.com.au/mesoblast-asxmsb-and-novartis-to-commercialise-remestemcel-l-for-ards-2020-11-20/
    Mesoblast (ASX:MSB) has entered an exclusive licence and collaboration agreement with Novartis to commercialise Mesoblast's remestemcel-L therapy drug.
    Mesoblast (ASX:MSB) has entered an exclusive licence and collaboration agreement with Novartis to commercialise Mesoblast's remestemcel-L therapy drug.
    themarketherald.com.au
    Bullish
  • B
    Bob
    This was weird to me. I combed through the 10-Q, and noticed this under Subsequent Events:

    "On November 3, 2020 AgeX entered into a one year lease effective January 1, 2021 for office space only comprising 135 square feet in a building in an office and research park at 1101 Marina Village Parkway, Suite 201, Alameda, California. Base monthly rent is $947 for the entire lease term and also covers office furniture rental, janitorial services, utilities and internet service."

    Now AgeX's current lab lease is for 24,000 square feet at 965 Atlantic Avenue, Alameda, California of $36,942.50/month expires on 12/31/20. (They have 2 Sublessors paying $19,400/month in total, so net cost to AgeX is about $17,500/month).

    The 2 locations are just about 2 minutes apart. I don't *think* AgeX is moving out of its labs at the end of the year, and doing away with its own brick and mortar. But with all the outsourcing, downsizing , partnering and 3rd party licensing, it does seem a tad curious that the existing lease (which hasn't been renewed yet) ends the day before the 1 room office opens up down the street.

    Probably just another one of my baseless wacky theories.....
  • B
    Bob
    6 weeks until the Annual Meeting of Stockholders on 12/28. Do we get any news before then? Does the share price fill the gap back to 89 cents? Will we get a Letter to Shareholders as we did from Mike West and Greg Bailey at the end of November 2019. I'm considering registering for the meeting as a participant (it calls for a few extra steps), if the company still hasn't provided us updates about Cytiva II, iTR plans, cancer applications, Univercyte progress and financing plans. Or at least a good deal of them!
  • G
    G
    I’m holding a bag of AGE at 2.2. Day by day it is going down. Is it worth to hold long or better to exit and take losses. Any suggestion would be appreciated?
  • P
    Peter
    Maybe it‘s me, but it seems like West and Aubrey have even taken their differences into the company‘s own interviews. Aubrey seems to acknowledge, that cellular rejuvenation is an extremely important cornerstone, but that the aging body encounters difficulties, that transcend that. In a nutshell, this implies, that somehow, the whole is older than the sum of its parts. I can’t say, I agree. The maintenance of the overall system is kept in shape, by resetting the clock. It’s notable in particular, that the impact of telomerase goes well beyond just restoring telomere length, but it affects gene expression. The supercentenarian experiment and the ACT clone cows demonstrate, that the original settings can be salvaged, at any point in life.

    West on the other hand, subtly dishes out against Aubrey, by denying his frequently cited car- and building-analogy. And I think, he‘s right. Wear-and-tear in a traditional sense is not an issue for life. While it can occur, there is a fundamental difference. The car, as any inanimate object, is neither self-replicating, nor designed to perpetuate its kind, and not self-constructing, much less from any given component. Otherwise you could remove a button from the dashboard, put it in some concoction of reprogramming factors, secure the energy supply, and have yourself a new car, just by watching it construct itself. That would be some car. Obviously, the design schematic of the car is not included in all its parts, much less does that schematic have the innate ability to execute its own construction manual. But life does. That‘s where the analogy is flawed.

    I don‘t deny, that iTR might leave some work to do, but to my way if thinking, it‘s mostly not to be regarded as aging-research. More like the enhancement of maintenance. Much of it might become necessary, to deal with man-made threats, that evolution hasn’t necessarily prepared us for.
  • B
    Bob
    Last year, the Letter to Shareholders (dated 11/29) came out on 12/3, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, almost exactly 1 year after AgeX went public. If they follow the same formula here, we would get one on Tuesday 12/1, ten days from now.
  • M
    Mr
    Does anyone here know how far AgeX is from starting enrollment for phase 1 trials?
  • F
    Felix
    Greg Bailey was on a panel today called “Investing in the Age of Longevity 2020.” What stood out to me was that, while he usually focuses more on their near term projects, today he was very focused on tissue regeneration.

    Asked about notable things happening in the past year at Juvenescence, he recounted the failures of ResTORbio and Unity, saying that we can learn from failures, and it changes the framework. “I think that what startled me out of our sector is spontaneous tissue regeneration. A couple of projects out of Harvard have been successful, both with the optic nerve and the stereocilia of the ear, regenerating it with small molecule concoctions, which is incredible, and opens so many fascinating areas. So I continue to be incredibly excited about the quality of the science that we’re seeing.”

    Asked about his experience talking to investment banks, he said again that the bigger banks are ahead of biotech investors, and that investors are slow because the field is still nascent and is perceived as high-risk. He thinks the diversified portfolio at Juv will help with this.

    Asked about hot areas: “Tissue regeneration is just captivating. You damage a kidney, and we’re able to regrow you a brand new kidney. Children who are under the age of seven who accidentally amputate their tip of their finger, some of them will regrow the finger. That’s astonishing. That means the cells must be talking to each other to reorganize into arteries, bones, tendons, skin. How do we turn that back on in an amputee? This is not around the corner, but it’s something you see coming, and hats off to Yamanaka and people like Mike West who’ve done a lot of the pioneering work in this area. So that’s incredibly compelling.”

    Lastly, he mentioned their focus on creating an ecosystem, and used the AgeX-LyGenesis example that Jim Melon talked about recently.