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AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (AGE)

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0.8100+0.0150 (+1.89%)
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  • B
    Bob
    We talked last week about AGE’s breakthrough moment coming between a day and a year from now. But I’m starting to notice a few things coalescing around the end of 1Q21. Mist obviously, that’s around when AGE will have run through its $8.5mm lending facility from JUV. I don’t know why $8.5mm was originally chosen, but I suppose it’s possible that JUV saw that amount as sufficient to bridge AGE to another source of funding, likely some kind of positive development. And now we hear Jim Mellon saying JUV could IPO in as little as 6 months, aka the end of 1Q21. One would think with JUV spending around half its external capital on equity and debt for AGE, they would want something meaningful from AGE to show investors, and certainly not a 50% ownership in a company that has taken up $60mm of JUV capital, yet is only worth $15nm marked at today’s share price. Seems to me we could see something meaningful come out of AGE within the next 100! days, in order to provide funding for operations, while boosting AGE’s image and share price in time for a JUV Spring IPO. This is, of course, 99% speculation, and leans to the optimistic side of Jim Mellon’s 6-12 months for a Juvenescence IPO, and of course everything is subject to further delay.. But one could imagine AGE would need to start running well in advance of 12 months, should the IPO come to pass.
  • B
    Bob
    British billionaire Jim Mellon plans to take his life extension start-up public in six to 12 months

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2020/09/29/billionaire-jim-mellon-plans-to-take-life-extension-start-up-public.html
    British billionaire Jim Mellon is planning to take his life extension company coupublic in the next six to 12 months.
    British billionaire Jim Mellon is planning to take his life extension company coupublic in the next six to 12 months.
    www.google.com
  • B
    Bob
    John Mauldin, who until recently was on Agex’s board, sends out a weekly newsletter, generally discussing macroeconomics. This week he mentioned “I believe within five years we will have something that looks like the Fountain of Middle Age, and within 10 to 15 years actually make you younger, while at the same time beating cancer, heart disease, and so on. It will truly be the age of technological marvels.” Sounds like he is predicting 5 years until iTR is in the clinic, and 10-15 years until it is used systematically.
  • P
    Peter
    These are interesting announcements from our friend, Prof. Yamanaka. But it also illustrates the problems, and the extent of AgeX‘s lead. In my opinion, iPSCs only make sense, when produced for each patient, by snapping your fingers. They would at the same time have to conform with the cGMP. For as long as there is no magic facility, to pull this off, it‘s clear, what kind of edge AgeX has. They have UniverCyte, PureStem, confirm with the cGMP, and have FDA clearance, to begin human trials.

    The price target of 1 Million Yen seems reasonable. That‘s about USD 9,500. But their quantity restraints make this look like a tedious endeavor. It‘s also a futile effort, to produce many cell lines, to cover as many HLA-signatures as possible. The real advantage of iPSCs would only materialize, if the treatment was perfectly customized, as in to be used only on the donor. As is stands, that sounds virtually unattainable. AgeX is way ahead of them.

    https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/09/28/national/science-health/project-start-supplying-ips-cells-widely-lower-cost/
    The aim of the project is to supply the cells to 1,000 patients per year at ¥1 million per person.
    The aim of the project is to supply the cells to 1,000 patients per year at ¥1 million per person.
    www.japantimes.co.jp
  • P
    Peter
    This is brilliant. It seems to predate AgeX‘s going public. It only doesn‘t answer, what‘s up with the guitar. Note how he stresses the inevitability of drawing upon these mechanisms. It‘s exactly that unlocking of the immortality of the species, for the individual. The Master has yet to meet his match. I‘m definitely with him, on his logic.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NpglNSrwof8
    From RAADFest 2017 Immortality transfer!?
    From RAADFest 2017 Immortality transfer!?
    www.youtube.com
  • P
    Peter
    Scientists show that the rate of telomere shortening is determined by the tissue type, genetic variability, and environmental exposures.
    Scientists show that the rate of telomere shortening is determined by the tissue type, genetic variability, and environmental exposures.
    www.longevity.technology
  • P
    Peter
    Aren’t we the persistent one? Ultimately, it doesn’t matter. If iTR works, it’ll be second to none. Stem cell treatment will also beat the efficacy of any transplant, where applicable.

    https://www.longevity.technology/senolytics-applied-to-the-rejuvenation-of-organs/
    Senolytics can rejuvenate organs from elderly donors by eliminating senescent cells and alleviating age-associated inflammation.
    Senolytics can rejuvenate organs from elderly donors by eliminating senescent cells and alleviating age-associated inflammation.
    www.longevity.technology
  • P
    Peter
    Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have identified the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to the heart in a recent international study. This finding will permit the identification of new therapeutic tar
    Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have identified the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to the heart in a recent international study. This finding will permit the identification of new therapeutic tar
    www.technologynetworks.com
  • P
    Peter
    ‚The precise mechanisms underlying aging remain elusive.‘

    Whatever... Let‘s call it another report from a parallel reality.

    https://www.longevity.technology/targeting-senescent-cells-to-extend-lifespan/
    Recent findings from animal studies indicate that targeting cellular senescence in vivo may prevent or alleviate age-related diseases.
    Recent findings from animal studies indicate that targeting cellular senescence in vivo may prevent or alleviate age-related diseases.
    www.longevity.technology
  • B
    Bob
    How much longer until my friends no longer think I belong in a tinfoil hat for owning AgeX? A week? A month? A year? A decade? Forever in the hat?
  • P
    Peter
    Naturally occurring viral vectors of human liver origin may be more effective than vectors grown in cultured lab conditions for liver gene therapy, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine this month.
    Naturally occurring viral vectors of human liver origin may be more effective than vectors grown in cultured lab conditions for liver gene therapy, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine this month.
    www.biopharma-reporter.com
  • P
    Peter
    Aubrey’s preaching to the choir, again. He‘s as persistent about divide and conquer as West is about his unifying influence. It’s almost astounding, that they decided to work together at all. Aubrey can certainly hedge his bets, that way. And if he has something to contribute, he‘s a fine addition to the team. Divide and conquer may be somewhat useful, while only pieces of the puzzle are singled out. If iTR hits the spot, divide and conquer might quickly disappear from the debates.

    https://www.longevity.technology/reversing-damage-to-rewind-the-aging-clock/
    Emerging evidence suggests that targeting systemic damage may hold promise for rejuvenation and the treatment of age-related disorders.
    Emerging evidence suggests that targeting systemic damage may hold promise for rejuvenation and the treatment of age-related disorders.
    www.longevity.technology
  • F
    Felix
    Jim Mellon spoke at the Aging Research and Drug Discovery conference this month and made a couple noteworthy new comments. He said that they are expecting $200-250 million from their current round of financing which, if I remember correctly, is up from the $150 million Greg Bailey mentioned before. They then plan to go public within a year “at the latest.”

    While talking about Lygensis, he mentioned they’re using AgeX’s UniverCyte stem cells:
    “The great thing about it is that this can be done as an outpatient procedure for about $100,000, compared to $700,000 for a liver transplant, and because of the use of AgeX’s stem cells, we will not have to put these patients subsequent to their procedure onto immunosuppressant drugs. So there’s a very, very big market potential for this, and we’ll know within a year whether this works or not in a dose-escalating phase 2 trial.”
  • P
    Peter
    A promising new study, using pigs, suggests researchers may have found a way to help livers in end stage cancer regenerate.
    A promising new study, using pigs, suggests researchers may have found a way to help livers in end stage cancer regenerate.
    www.longevity.technology
  • P
    Peter
    When it comes to studying aging, the mouse model is often only suitable on a limited basis. The mouse seems to have a number of imperfections, that are easily fixed, thereby doubling or even tripling its lifespan. In man, that tinkering usually doesn’t achieve that much.

    However, I think, in this case, there‘s not that much reason to be concerned, when it comes to transferring the mouse results to other species. Not only is the evidence of these mechanisms all around us, and we already have laboratory evidence for human cells. What makes me particularly optimistic, is that in this case, we are not tinkering with the imperfections of mice. It goes far deeper than that. Our target is the somatic restriction, aiming to unlock the immortality of the species for the individual. The concept of the somatic restriction is ubiquitous in nature. With the exception of the immortal lifeforms, you can find it almost everywhere. But in each of those cases, the germ line still remains immortal. Since this is a very fundamental mechanism, that can be observed all over the place. I see no reason, why it should work on mice, and fail on humans. If anything, I would expect the human results to be even more miraculous. As opposed to mice, you can‘t tinker with people as easily, to double or triple their lifespan. This allows you to speculate, that we have less systemic imperfections than the mouse.

    We still need test subjects, that are closer to the human genome. But I see no reason, to be overly concerned about the outcome. In the long run, looking at decades into the post-aging world, I expect perpetual youth, to be achieved even more easily than in the beginning. As I‘ve pointed out before, I wouldn’t expect anyone to stand idly by, and watch people deteriorate. You would keep people from aging in the first place. The economic benefits alone will already take us there, aside from the humanitarian aspect. It remains to be seen, if we will one day consider the cancer risk so limited, that we can all get constitutive telomerase expression. The least would be, to get cancer under control so well, that almost nobody dies anymore. But even if we all report in for cyclical activation of TERT, I wouldn’t expect anyone to willingly surpass his 30s, without getting a reset. The benefits would be too obvious. This also means, that Greg Bailey‘s „incredibly disruptive“ prevention will become a reality. It must be easier, to keep people from aging in the first place, than to undo all the damage, aging has already done. I expect this to work for the oldest of the old as well, but I believe it will get even easier, the less systemic damage you‘re already dealing with. The oldest ages will have to be reset just once, when the product is first introduced. If it lives up to expectations, it‘s not terribly far out, to assume, that there won’t be any people of advanced biological age, in the future.
  • P
    Peter
    The snacker again? If it is, he has a tight limit, this time.
  • B
    Bob
    In regards to yesterday's presentation (AgeX Aging & Regeneration: Teaching Old Cells New Tricks), Felix was wondering how this new slide deck came about. Good question, as they typically accompany a conference presentation. And I agree it is the same presentation from long ago, except for Slide 20 pasted in at the end. My guess is this was presented to somewhere without an NDA in place, so AGE felt it needed to also present it publicly. This would also answer Peter's question about why they slapped in this mysterious slide with very little context otherwise. Like Felix, I'm excited to have it presented to us sometime soon.