AIR.DE - Airbus SE

XETRA - XETRA Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
123.84
+1.08 (+0.88%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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Previous Close122.76
Open122.26
Bid123.60 x N/A
Ask123.72 x N/A
Day's Range122.12 - 124.08
52 Week Range78.93 - 133.82
Volume71,788
Avg. Volume61,484
Market Cap96.332B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.61
PE Ratio (TTM)25.75
EPS (TTM)4.81
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.65 (1.34%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-15
1y Target Est113.00
  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-The wrong stuff? Chuck Yeager, pilot who broke sound barrier, sues Airbus

    Chuck Yeager, the retired U.S. Air Force pilot who broke the sound barrier, has sued Airbus SE, accusing the aerospace company of using his name and likeness without permission to promote a new high-speed helicopter. In a complaint filed on Wednesday that refers to him as "one of the most, if not the most, famous pilots of all time," the 96-year-old Yeager objected to a June 2017 piece on Airbus' website about making the Airbus Racer a fast and cost-effective way to fly. The piece quoted Guillaume Faury, now Airbus' chief executive officer and at the time Airbus Helicopters' CEO, as saying: "Seventy years ago, Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier," and Airbus was now "trying to break the cost barrier.

  • Benzinga

    Airbus Hikes Forecast For Future Freighter Demand

    The European aircraft manufacturer predicts air cargo will double by 2038 based on a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.6%, up from last year's CAGR estimate of 3.4%. Of the total dedicated freighters in service by then, Airbus now estimates that 2,500 would be newbuilds and converted passenger planes, with 60% of those replacing existing aircraft and the remainder representing incremental growth. Conversions would account for most of the fleet activity, supplemented by 850 newly manufactured planes, Airbus said in its Sept. 18 report.

  • The wrong stuff? Chuck Yeager, pilot who broke sound barrier, sues Airbus
    Reuters

    The wrong stuff? Chuck Yeager, pilot who broke sound barrier, sues Airbus

    In a complaint filed on Wednesday that refers to him as "one of the most, if not the most, famous pilots of all time," the 96-year-old Yeager objected to a June 2017 piece on Airbus' website about making the Airbus Racer a fast and cost-effective way to fly. The piece quoted Guillaume Faury, now Airbus' chief executive officer and at the time Airbus Helicopters' CEO, as saying: "Seventy years ago, Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier," and Airbus was now "trying to break the cost barrier.

  • Reuters

    U.S. pilot who broke sound barrier sues Airbus for trademark infringement

    Chuck Yeager, the retired U.S. Air Force pilot who broke the sound barrier, has sued Airbus SE, saying it used his name, identity and likeness without permission in promotional material for its Airbus Racer helicopter concept. Yeager, 96, accused Airbus of trademark infringement and violating his right of publicity, in a complaint filed on Wednesday with the U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, California.

  • German prosecutors probe Airbus for potential misuse of client documents
    Reuters

    German prosecutors probe Airbus for potential misuse of client documents

    Munich prosecutors said on Wednesday they had launched a probe against Airbus after the company notified the authorities about potential irregularities involving customer documents. Airbus confirmed that it had informed prosecutors that some employees may have treated customer documents in an illegal manner. The documents are related to two German procurement deals involving program line communications, intelligence and security, Airbus said.

  • MarketWatch

    Airbus self-declares to authorities about 'potential wrongdoings' by several employees

    Airbus SE said Wednesday that it has "self declared" to German authorities of "potential wrongdoings" by several employees, regarding customer documents related to two future procurement projects. The German projects are part of its communications, intelligence and security business. The aerospace giant and Boeing Co. chief rival said the disclosure was the result of an ongoing internal review, which was supported by an external law firm. Airbus said it will fully cooperate with authorities to resolve the matter. The U.S.-listed shares of Airbus rose 0.6% in midday trading and Boeing shares tacked on 0.1%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 61 points, or 0.2%.

  • Reuters

    France to host pilot plant for Franco-German battery consortium - source

    France will host a pilot plant to make electric car batteries, a French Finance Ministry source said, part of a pan-European project to rival Asia's dominance of the battery market. France had committed 700 million euros and Germany would offer 1 billion euros towards a project that envisaged setting up plants in both nations in future, the source said of the plans. The electric car battery project aims to repeat the success of Airbus, which began producing aircraft 50 years ago as a pan-European project with public support.

  • France to host pilot plant for Franco-German battery consortium: source
    Reuters

    France to host pilot plant for Franco-German battery consortium: source

    France will host a pilot plant to make electric car batteries, a French Finance Ministry source said, part of a pan-European project to rival Asia's dominance of the battery market. France had committed 700 million euros and Germany would offer 1 billion euros toward a project that envisaged setting up plants in both nations in future, the source said of the plans. The electric car battery project aims to repeat the success of Airbus, which began producing aircraft 50 years ago as a pan-European project with public support.

  • Airbus revises up jet demand, warns of 'lose-lose' tariff war
    Reuters

    Airbus revises up jet demand, warns of 'lose-lose' tariff war

    Airbus warned of the risks of a 'lose-lose' transatlantic tariff war on Wednesday as it raised forecasts for jetliner demand over the next 20 years, led by the new industrial hubs of Asia. Airbus Chief Commercial Officer Christian Scherer voiced alarm about the prospect of a tit-for-tat tariff war on new jets. If there is an impact, the same impact will happen here in Europe," he said, referring to the prospect of European reprisals against Boeing.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 3-Airbus revises up jet demand, warns of 'lose-lose' tariff war

    Airbus raised its 20-year forecast for jetliner demand on Wednesday despite expected slower growth in traffic, as it predicts airlines will replace ageing fleets with smaller, more fuel-efficient new planes. The industry faces a squall of new pressures from trade tensions, the partial unwinding of globalisation and an anti-flying campaign from climate activists, notably in Europe. Airbus Chief Commercial Officer Christian Scherer voiced alarm about the prospect of a tit-for-tat tariff war between the United States and Europe after the World Trade Organization signalled that Washington can impose sanctions in a long-running dispute over aircraft subsidies.

  • Reuters

    VietJet orders 15 Airbus A321XLR - sources

    Europe's Airbus has sold 15 of its new A321XLR jetliner to Vietnamese budget carrier VietJet, bringing to almost 300 the number of its longest-range narrowbody models earmarked for customers since June, industry sources said. Airbus declined comment. No immediate comment was available from VietJet.

  • The Trade Dogfight Trump Can Say He Won Fair and Square
    Bloomberg

    The Trade Dogfight Trump Can Say He Won Fair and Square

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Terms of Trade newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Economics on Twitter for more.If President Donald Trump imposes new tariffs on European goods next month, America’s transatlantic allies can’t say they they’ve been blindsided like they have with other trade policies launched from his White House.While some may bristle that the self-proclaimed “Tariff Man” is expanding his trade fight with the European Union, Trump would be acting on the right side of international law in a long-running case pitting Toulouse, France-based Airbus and Chicago-based Boeing. This time he’ll have the explicit authorization of the World Trade Organization, the referee of global commerce.That’s a key distinction from Trump’s tariffs on Chinese goods, or steel and aluminum imports, or the threat of tariffs on foreign cars and parts — instances when he acts based on his presidential authority. It’s also a break from the norm for a leader who has trashed the WTO as the “single worst trade deal ever made” and threatened to withdraw from the organization entirely.Here’s how the international trading system is supposed to work:If a country gets upset with another country’s trade practices, it can file a dispute at the WTO where a panel of experts offers a judgment. If the losing country doesn’t comply with that ruling, the WTO allows the winning country to retaliate. For most of his first term in office Trump has preferred to cut to the chase and levy tariffs that he says are exempt from WTO oversight because they’re necessary to protect America’s “public morals” and national security. But in the instance of Airbus, Trump and his predecessors have pursued and succeeded in a landmark case against the EU that’s been a decade-and-a-half in the making. Last year the WTO ruled that the EU hasn’t ended its illegal subsidies, which Boeing and the U.S. claim give Airbus an unfair advantage, and the WTO will soon green-light new U.S. tariffs on billions of dollars worth of European goods.But the other shoe has yet to drop. In a similar action that’s still winding through the Geneva-based WTO, the European Commission is readying its own tariffs on U.S. exports in retaliation for unfair subsidies given to Boeing. EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom summed up the situation on Monday by saying “both we and the U.S. have sinned” and the time has come to settle the dispute rather than resort to tit-for-tat tariffs.The multi-billion dollar question now: Will Trump see an opportunity to forge a comprehensive aerospace accord with the EU or kick off a transatlantic trade war of epic proportions instead?Charting the Trade WarGlobal trade in services slowed during the first quarter of 2019, according to a new World Trade Organization report, which describes a “broad loss in momentum” among sectors like technology and tourism.Today’s Must ReadsU.S.-Japan deal | Washington has plans to sign a trade accord with Japan in coming weeks, though Tokyo warned any deal must include pledges of no new tariffs auto exports. Plow ahead | Chinese trade officials are coming to the U.S. this week to prepare the agenda for a meeting of top negotiators in October, the Ministry of Commerce said. Chip shot | The U.S. government will need to agree to talks with Huawei as part of a future trade deal with China, a top executive at China’s largest tech company said. Landmark hearing | Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy has been on trial since he became Britain’s prime minister, and on Tuesday his lawyers will defend it in the U.K.’s highest court. Swiss miss | Switzerland’s economy is expected to expand less quickly than the government previously project, slowed by weaker demand from the world’s major economies.Economic AnalysisSpending less | Economic slowdowns, trade wars and the U.S. Huawei ban threaten tech spending. Further easing | The PBOC stepping up stimulus to buffer the Chinese economy from trade war.Coming UpSept. 18: Japan, Italy trade balance Sept. 19-20: U.S.-China talks in WashingtonLike Terms of Trade?Don’t keep it to yourself. Colleagues and friends can sign up here. We also publish Balance of Power, a daily briefing on the latest in global politics.For even more: Subscribe to Bloomberg All Access for full global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, The Bloomberg Open and The Bloomberg Close.How are we doing? We want to hear what you think about this newsletter. Let our trade tsar know.\--With assistance from Brendan Murray and Viktoria Dendrinou.To contact the author of this story: Bryce Baschuk in Geneva at bbaschuk2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sarah McGregor at smcgregor5@bloomberg.net, Richard BravoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airbus sees no major 2019 impact from possible U.S. tariffs
    Reuters

    Airbus sees no major 2019 impact from possible U.S. tariffs

    Possible U.S. tariffs against Airbus aircraft and European parts are unlikely to have a major impact on the European planemaker's 2019 results, but disruption cannot be ruled out, its chief executive said. In an interview with Politico, released by German stablemate Die Welt on Monday, CEO Guillaume Faury the main risk was that airlines would refuse to buy Airbus jets because of the risk that repeat purchases would be rendered uneconomic by future tariffs. The World Trade Organization has at least partially approved a U.S. request to impose tariffs on European Union aircraft and other goods as part of a 15-year trade dispute in which the EU is also preparing similar action against the U.S.

  • Airbus, French exporters reel as U.S. tariffs loom in subsidy row
    Reuters

    Airbus, French exporters reel as U.S. tariffs loom in subsidy row

    PARIS/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Shares in Airbus and French luxury goods exporters fell on Monday as the European Union acknowledged it may face U.S. tariffs in a long-running dispute over aircraft subsidies, part of an escalating tit-for-tat trade row. The World Trade Organization has approved a U.S. request to impose tariffs on European goods in the latest chapter of a dispute over aircraft subsidies that could lead to European reprisals, two people familiar with the case said. The EU's trade chief said the United States was likely to impose tariffs "quite soon".

  • Financial Times

    Stocks to watch: Airbus, Safran, LVMH, Tullow, Prosus, Cineworld

    ● Airbus led the explorers lower on reports that the World Trade Organization had formally approved a US request to impose tariffs on some European goods, the latest chapter in a 15-year tit-for-tat dispute over aircraft subsidies. The settlement panel on the Airbus-Boeing dispute had sent a confidential ruling to the European Commission and the US Trade Representative that gave the US the right to impose “punitive tariffs” on EU products “from cheeses to Airbus planes and parts”, Politico reported. The WTO still needs to rule on an Airbus counterclaim that Boeing was being supported by subsidies from the US government, which is running six to nine months behind Boeing’s claim against Airbus.

  • Reuters

    REFILE-Vietravel Airlines plans 2020 launch in fast-growing market

    Vietnam's Vietravel Airlines plans to launch its first flight next year, Chief Executive Vu Duc Bien said, joining a rising number of entrants in one of the world's fast-growing aviation markets. Vietravel Airlines, owned by the country's leading tour operator Vietravel, will start with three to four leased planes and expects to place an order for Airbus SE or Boeing Co narrow-body jets at the Singapore Airshow in February, which will be scheduled for delivery within five years, Bien told Reuters in an interview on Thursday.

  • Embraer delivers new jet that Boeing may soon sell against Airbus
    Reuters

    Embraer delivers new jet that Boeing may soon sell against Airbus

    Embraer hopes to see more orders for its newest passenger plane by the end of the year, an executive said on Thursday, as Boeing readies to take over the Brazilian planemaker's commercial jets division in what could mark the next phase of its rivalry with Airbus . Manufacture of the E195-E2, as Embraer's plane is known, will soon be controlled by Boeing, which needs regulatory approval to close on the deal to buy 80% of Embraer's commercial jets division for $4.2 billion. Embraer on Thursday delivered its first E195-E2 plane, which will seat about 140, to Brazil's No. 3 airline Azul at its headquarters in Sao Paulo state.

  • Financial Times

    French check UK-made goods in first Brexit dress rehearsal

    French customs officials chose trucks carrying Airbus wing parts and baby equipment imported from the UK for special inspections on Thursday in a rehearsal for a possible no-deal Brexit that could disrupt cross-Channel trade. “We are preparing as if there is no deal,” said Gérald Darmanin, the French budget minister responsible for customs, as the Brittany Ferries vessel Mont St Michel from Portsmouth disgorged trucks and holidaymakers’ cars and caravans on to the Ouistreham dock in the early morning drizzle. as early as October 31 is now the most likely outcome despite more than two years of EU-UK negotiations, and it has been accelerating preparations with manufacturers, truckers and logistics groups to handle the nearly 5m truck movements a year between French ports and the UK — 80 per cent of them from other EU countries such as Germany and Spain.

  • 737 MAX Crisis Hurts Boeing Aircraft Deliveries
    Market Realist

    737 MAX Crisis Hurts Boeing Aircraft Deliveries

    Due to the 737 MAX's grounding, Boeing (BA) has seen a massive decline in aircraft deliveries. BA shipped 18 commercial aircraft in August, down 72% YoY.

  • Europe orders urgent Airbus helicopter checks after Norway crash
    Reuters

    Europe orders urgent Airbus helicopter checks after Norway crash

    European regulators have ordered immediate checks on recently delivered versions of some Airbus helicopters after a crash in Arctic Norway last month killed five Norwegians and their Swedish pilot. Norwegian investigators have not discovered a root cause of the AS350 B3E helicopter crash on Aug. 31, but preliminary findings prompted Airbus Helicopters, the world's largest commercial helicopter maker, to call for precautionary checks on parts linking the engine and main gearbox. An emergency airworthiness directive issued on Wednesday by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) makes those checks compulsory before the aircraft make their next flight.

  • Financial Times

    Frequent flyer: what will the future of flying look like?

    Up against rival talks featuring historian Simon Schama, BBC presenter Mishal Husain and novelist Jeanette Winterson, I was concerned about how many would attend our session. It was standing-room only to listen to Tom Mackay, chief financial officer of Virgin Atlantic, Sandra Bour Schaeffer, a leading Airbus engineer and innovator, and Gary Smith, head of transformation at easyJet. Smith said easyJet was working with Wright Electric, a US company, to develop an electric aircraft for its services, which are short-haul.

  • Boeing Falls Further Behind Rival Airbus In Key Race As 737 Max Grounding Drags On
    Investor's Business Daily

    Boeing Falls Further Behind Rival Airbus In Key Race As 737 Max Grounding Drags On

    Boeing reported another weak month of orders and deliveries amid the global 737 Max grounding, drifting further behind its archrival in deliveries this year

  • World airliner fleet to more than double - Airbus
    Reuters Videos

    World airliner fleet to more than double - Airbus

    The news won't please greens, but the number of airliners in the sky is set to soar. That at least is the forecast from planemaker Airbus. The European giant updated its annual outlook on Wednesday (September 18). It now says there will be 47,680 jets in the air by 2038. That's more than double the current total, but actually slightly down on the firm's forecast last year. Even so, it's revised higher the demand for new planes. It says more will be needed as airlines are phasing out older jets faster than expected to make room for more fuel-efficient new models. Airbus says airlines will take 39,210 planes over the next two decades - almost 2,000 up on its last prediction. Asia is once again expected to lead growth. Air passenger traffic there is set to treble over the period. That will see China's domestic market leapfrog the U.S. and Western Europe as the world's biggest aviation hub. In a nod to concern about emissions, Airbus says more efficient planes will make all that growth carbon neutral.