AIR.PA - Airbus SE

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
123.64
-0.58 (-0.47%)
As of 12:57PM CET. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close124.22
Open123.44
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range123.04 - 124.28
52 Week Range77.50 - 137.32
Volume248,762
Avg. Volume1,236,349
Market Cap95B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.27
PE Ratio (TTM)25.50
EPS (TTM)4.85
Earnings DateFeb 13, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.65 (1.32%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-15
1y Target Est120.82
  • Fossil Fuel-Free Air Travel Gets Closer With a Short Electric Flight
    Bloomberg

    Fossil Fuel-Free Air Travel Gets Closer With a Short Electric Flight

    (Bloomberg) -- Vancouver-based Harbour Air just flew an all-electric commercial aircraft—for five minutes.The neon green and indigo blue seaplane took off from the Fraser River in Richmond, British Columbia, early Tuesday morning as a small crowd cheered from the dock. The propeller aircraft, a six-passenger de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver prototype, was powered by a magniX magni500 electric motor and piloted by Harbour Air Chief Executive Officer Greg McDougall.It was a small but significant step in the broader quest to replace fossil fuel-powered aircraft, a mode of transport increasingly viewed through the prism of global warming.The test was “far more than the laboratory exercises we’ve seen in the past,” said Robert Mann, the New York-based head of aviation consultancy R.W. Mann & Co. “It’s a real serious, practical test.”Harbour said it plans to spend the next two years getting its new plane approved for commercial flight. The carrier, which flies to a dozen destinations on the West Coast, has 53 planes and 450 employees spread between British Columbia and Seattle. There are about 170 different electrically-propelled aircraft programs in development worldwide, up 50% since April 2018, according to consulting firm Roland Berger. Much of that development is in the urban air taxi category and general aviation segments. Current electric technology favors these aircraft, which have lower power needs than large commercial aircraft. Harbour’s electric Beaver can fly about 60 minutes on one charge. But regulators require aircraft operating under visual flight rules (of the smaller, noncommercial variety) to have the ability to fly 30 additional minutes, which gives Harbour’s new plane a mere 30 minutes of flight time. The relatively short timeline isn’t a problem for the airline, however, said magniX CEO Roei Ganzarski.“The majority of Harbour Air’s flights are less than 25 minutes in length,” he said, adding that once the plane is certified, the companies will focus on extending the flight envelope.Those singing the gospel of electric vehicles often point to decreased operating costs. A fossil-fuel powered Beaver burns anywhere between $300 and $400 worth of fuel during a 100-mile flight, said Ganzarski. That same trip in the electric Beaver will cost anywhere from $4 to $10 in electricity, depending on the source, he said.The electric Beaver is theoretically cheaper to maintain than its combustion engine predecessor, too. Electric motors are sealed units, with a minimum of moving parts. Of course, since there has yet to be a commercial electric aircraft maintenance program, there may be unforeseen expenses. “The cost of being a pioneer is a relevant problem,” said Mann. “We don’t know the actual costs of operating electric airplanes.”The near-term is likely to see a generation of hybrid aircraft, pairing electric and conventional power systems along with smaller all-electric craft. Larger, fully-electric aircraft are still about a decade off.  “This is a great milestone for electric aviation.”Joby Aviation Inc. is targeting the air-taxi market with a plane that would carry four passengers and travel 150 miles. Uber Technologies Inc. plans to start an electric flying-taxi service, with pilot programs in Dallas, Los Angeles and Melbourne as soon as next year. Israel-based Eviation plans test flights next summer of its all-electric Alice, a nine-passenger plane powered by a smaller version of the magniX motor in Harbour’s Beaver.“Eviation is excited to congratulate our partner, magniX on its successful test flight of the magni500 propulsion system,” Eviation CEO Omer Bar-Yohay said Tuesday in a statement. “This is a great milestone for electric aviation.”Siemens AG, Airbus SE and Rolls-Royce Holdings Plc are working on a hybrid system, the E-Fan X, that would power a relatively large aircraft. Airbus said it’s targeting an initial flight of its demonstration aircraft in 2021 and expects to eventually phase in new electric technologies by about 2030.“Airbus has been flying electric for a couple of years,” Mann said. “But they’ve all been laboratory exercises as opposed to practical.”Consulting firm Roland Berger expects the first flight of such commercial aircraft to occur by 2032. Easyjet Plc has partnered with U.S.-based Wright Electric to develop a full-sized battery-powered airliner within a decade for flights of less than two hours.While manufacturers and airlines alike plan for an electric future, they’re still dealing with the politics of the present. Europe’s top airlines on Tuesday attacked European Union plans for a planned kerosene tax, part of the bloc’s sweeping new environmental strategy. Airlines called the duty both unnecessary and unfair, arguing that an investment in sustainable fuels and electric planes would ultimately be more effective in reducing carbon emissions. For its part, Harbour Air is likely to run into some infrastructure issues in the near term, Mann said, since most major airports lack fast-charging capabilities. Ganzarski said they will rely on existing infrastructure for now, but may attempt to build their own renewable infrastructure in the future. The company reported revenue of CAD $69.9 million ($52.8 million) in 2019. McDougall didn’t return a request for comment.But there are other challenges. Seaplanes, as the name implies, operate from bodies of water rather than land. Unlike meticulously paved and maintained runways, open water is a high-friction surface which requires a far greater amount of energy for a plane to gain enough momentum to take flight.Salt water is another issue. It’s naturally corrosive, eating away at a plane’s surfaces and parts. Finally, the Pacific Northwest isn’t exactly pleasant in December: Cold temperatures have a negative effect on power density and power conversion in batteries. “If you were thinking of the toughest case for electric flight, it would probably be a seaplane in salt water,” said Mann. \--With assistance from Justin Bachman.To contact the author of this story: Josh Petri in Portland at jpetri4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: David Rovella at drovella@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Boeing 737 Max Orders Rise While Airbus Eyes 2019 Crown
    Investor's Business Daily

    Boeing 737 Max Orders Rise While Airbus Eyes 2019 Crown

    Boeing 737 Max order continued to climb last month despite its continued global grounding, while rival Airbus is closing in on bragging rights for the year.

  • HNA’s SR Technics Sale Draws Airbus, Hainan Province
    Bloomberg

    HNA’s SR Technics Sale Draws Airbus, Hainan Province

    (Bloomberg) -- HNA Group Co.’s sale of its majority stake in Swiss aircraft-maintenance firm SR Technics has attracted interest from companies including Airbus SE as well as the government of China’s Hainan province, according to people familiar with the matter.Other aircraft maintenance and repair organizations, known as MROs, have also expressed interest in acquiring SR Technics, the people said, asking not to be identified because the deliberations are private. For the Hainan government, a potential investment in SR Technics could lead to forming a joint venture or buying a significant stake in the company, one of the people said.HNA has been weighing a potential sale of SR Technics as it continues with its efforts to reduce debt, Bloomberg News first reported in February. In 2016, the embattled Chinese conglomerate acquired the 80% stake in the aircraft maintenance firm from Mubadala Development Co. for an undisclosed sum. The majority holdings could be valued at $700 million to $1 billion, people familiar with the matter have said.Based at Zurich airport, SR Technics has more than 3,000 employees globally and provides maintenance, repair and overhaul services for airframes, engines and components, its website shows. Mubadala, the Abu Dhabi government-backed investment fund, retains the remaining 20% stake.Hainan, an island province known as China’s Hawaii, has set an ambitious goal to become a free trade zone focused on tourism, services and high-end technology. The island is also where HNA headquarters are. Chen Feng, the conglomerate’s chairman, said in a speech in March that the group plans to further expand its aircraft maintenance business in the province, making it a globally competitive “one-stop shop” for the industry.Talks are still ongoing and a buyer could emerge within the next few months, the people said. There’s no certainty the suitors would proceed with formal bids and HNA could still decide to keep the assets, they said. Shares of Airbus fell 1.7% on Monday.Representatives for Airbus, HNA and SR Technics declined to comment, while the external office of the Hainan provincial government didn’t respond to requests for comment.(Updates to add share performance of Airbus in sixth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.net;Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, ;Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Robert FennerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airbus Secures Lead Over Boeing as 737 Max Uncertainty Continues
    Bloomberg

    Airbus Secures Lead Over Boeing as 737 Max Uncertainty Continues

    (Bloomberg) -- Shares of Airbus SE handily pulled ahead of rival Boeing Co. this year after a pair of fatal 737 Max plane crashes led to the grounding of the U.S. model’s entire fleet.Airbus is poised to finish the year ahead of Boeing for the first time since 2015, with an increase of roughly 50% since the start of January, compared to the Chicago-based company’s less than 10% gain.With the uncertainty of approvals for the Max to resume flying, many analysts predict the French aircraft maker will continue to outperform its troubled peer in 2020 as well. Yet Airbus’s own production issues at home amid trade concerns with the U.S. could also threaten its performance.“There is no question that Airbus has benefited from the problems at Boeing,” Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets UK, said in an interview. In fact, he still believes the market is under-pricing problems at the U.S. manufacturer.Shares of both planemakers began 2019 at a brisk pace with Boeing and Airbus each up about 35% through February. That changed in March, however, after the second 737 Max crash in five months, triggering investigations into the company.Uncertainty is expected to be the opening theme for Boeing in 2020, with some expecting Airbus’s shares to continue benefiting from the confusion, given it’s the only other major producer of commercial aircraft.That effective duopoly, however, has come into sharper focus as the World Trade Organization considers competing U.S. and European Union claims of unfair state subsidies.Airbus fell 4.4% last Tuesday after the WTO said the EU hadn’t sufficiently eliminated the adverse effects of subsidies to Airbus. It followed a ruling earlier in the year, which said the U.S. may impose retaliatory tariffs on European goods over its aid to Airbus, putting the company at the center of the trade tensions with U.S.While the 737 Max’s return to service will be the biggest issue to watch for Boeing next year, the focus on Airbus will on be on the fallout from the tariff war in addition to its manufacturing troubles and engine issues. Customizations to Airbus’s narrow-body planes, the same category that the 737 Max belongs to, have proven difficult to incorporate into the production line.Citigroup analyst Charles Armitage said Airbus’s opportunity to benefit from the 737 Max grounding was also limited in part because its comparable A320 family of planes is already sold out until at least 2024.Still, Airbus netted 542 aircraft orders in 2019 compared to a negative 95 for Boeing, adjusting for cancellations and conversions. Airbus’s market share for narrow-body aircraft now stands at 58%, up from 56% in January, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch analyst Benjamin Heelan.The latest blow to Boeing came last week when United Airlines Holdings Inc. said it would buy 50 Airbus A321XLR jets worth over $7 billion to replace its the aging Boeing 757-200 aircraft in its fleet. Boeing has postponed deciding whether to develop a new plane of comparable size as it wrestles with the troubles of the 737 Max.It’s still uncertain when the Max will be cleared to fly. Boeing said it expects U.S. aviation safety regulators to approve the redesign by the end of the year and to finalize new training standards in January. Meanwhile, Southwest Airlines Co., which is the largest operator of the 737 Max, has pulled the aircraft from its flight schedule through March 6. American Airlines Group Inc. and Ryanair Holdings Plc have also made similar moves.And then there will be the challenge of winning over the public.“It is clear to me that there is something fundamentally flawed in a plane that requires an elaborate and complex software fix to keep it in the air safely,” CMC’s Hewson said. Such a fix may work in a military aircraft where the pilot is able to eject, but it is “simply untenable” in a commercial aircraft that carries hundreds of passengers, the analyst said.Despite their current challenges, in the long run, both companies stand to gain from a rising demand for air travel amid a broader move toward urbanization. Air traffic is expected to continue growing at a 4% to 5% annual clip, said Pedro Marinheiro, a portfolio manager at Reyl & Cie,“Should things be resolved at Boeing, which is not yet the case, we believe the uncertainty discount applied to Boeing should progressively vanish,” he added.\--With assistance from Julie Johnsson and Tom Lavell.To contact the reporters on this story: Esha Dey in New York at edey@bloomberg.net;Chiara Remondini in Milan at cremondini@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brad Olesen at bolesen3@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Bissell-Linsk, Richard RichtmyerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Airbus faces delivery challenge, poised to win jet order race

    Airbus must hand a record number of aircraft to customers in December to meet delivery goals, company data showed on Thursday, and is all but certain of winning an annual order race against Boeing. Airbus delivered 77 aircraft in November to reach 725 for the year so far, according to Thursday's progress report. Airbus has a track record of achieving a late surge in deliveries, though it is also working to spread deliveries more evenly over the year in future to smooth earnings and avoid quality problems that can creep in when it is working flat out.

  • Airbus faces delivery challenge, poised to win jet order race
    Reuters

    Airbus faces delivery challenge, poised to win jet order race

    Airbus must hand a record number of aircraft to customers in December to meet delivery goals, company data showed on Thursday, and is all but certain of winning an annual order race against Boeing. Airbus delivered 77 aircraft in November to reach 725 for the year so far, according to Thursday's progress report. Airbus has a track record of achieving a late surge in deliveries, though it is also working to spread deliveries more evenly over the year in future to smooth earnings and avoid quality problems that can creep in when it is working flat out.

  • Barrons.com

    United Airlines Picks Airbus Over Boeing, but Don’t Blame the 737 MAX

    United Airlines is buying more Airbus planes. That’s a blow to Boeing. But it isn’t resulting from MAX-related problems.

  • Benzinga

    United Airlines To Buy 50 Airbus Planes For European Route

    United Airlines (NASDAQ: UAL) has made a firm order for 50 Airbus A321 extra-long-range aircraft to replace older, less efficient Boeing 757-200 aircraft, enabling a planned expansion of transatlantic routes from its East Coast hubs in Newark, New Jersey/New York and Washington Dulles International Airport. Adjusting the delivery time of the A350s in favor of the A321s could mean less cargo capacity for freight forwarders, depending on what planes in its fleet it continues to use. "In addition to strengthening our ability to fly more efficiently, the A321XLR's range capabilities open potential new destinations to further develop our route network and provide customers with more options to travel the globe," said Andrew Nocella, United's chief commercial officer, in a Dec. 3 statement.

  • Bamboo Airways to take delivery of first Boeing Dreamliner this month
    Reuters

    Bamboo Airways to take delivery of first Boeing Dreamliner this month

    Vietnamese startup Bamboo Airways said on Tuesday it will take delivery of a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner this month, its first wide-body aircraft, and aims to start direct flights to the United States by early 2021. The plane will be the first that Bamboo owns, Vice Chairman Dang Tat Thang said, adding that the airline currently operates 20 leased Airbus aircraft. "The new wide-body aircraft will enable us to launch our direct flights to the United States, in late 2020 or early 2021," Thang told a press conference.

  • TheStreet.com

    United Air Turns to Airbus to Replace Boeing Mid-Size Jets

    United Airlines, UAL one of Boeing's BA biggest customers, placed an order for 50 Airbus EADSY A321 extra-long jets that will replace the airline's fleet of Boeing 757 mid-sized jets. "The new Airbus A321XLR aircraft is an ideal one-for-one replacement for the older, less-efficient aircraft currently operating between some of the most vital cities in our intercontinental network," United Executive Vice President Andrew Nocella said in a statement. The about $6.5 billion deal with Boeing's European rival comes just months after one of United's executives, speaking on an earnings call, implored Boeing to provide clarity about whether it would proceed with the production of a line new mid-sized aircraft.

  • Wait Until Donald Trump Hears About the Carbon Border Tax
    Bloomberg

    Wait Until Donald Trump Hears About the Carbon Border Tax

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Next week, the European Union’s leaders will commit to cutting net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050. This historic pledge will require the continent to radically overhaul its entire economy, including a revolution in the production of steel, cement and chemicals — whose carbon emissions are particularly difficult to abate.None of this will happen, however, unless European companies feel able to invest in making themselves greener without suffering a loss of competitiveness. So the European Commission has been toying with the idea of a so-called “carbon border tax,” which would penalize imports from countries that don’t meet the same environmental standards.It’s a sensible idea but one that’s likely to cause the EU no end of grief. If U.S. President Donald Trump gets wind of a European “Green Deal” that includes a possible tax on American imports to help fight climate change (something he appears not to believe in), he’ll no doubt hit the roof. The climate crisis and trade conflicts are two of the world’s biggest challenges and they might be about to collide.(1)The logic of a carbon border tax is straightforward. To reach net zero emissions, Europe will have to expand the scope and effectiveness of its carbon trading system, which aims to to curb CO2 by making polluters pay. But if the price of purchasing pollution allowances keeps climbing (as it has been), businesses might decamp to countries with laxer emissions controls, a phenomenon known as “carbon leakage.” “If necessary, if there is carbon leakage, we will have to think about a carbon border tax,” European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen told the United Nations climate summit in Madrid this week. The risk of carbon leakage is much debated. There’s been little evidence of it so far but that’s probably because carbon prices have been low and heavy industry hasn’t had to expend much effort on cutting emissions; the power-generating sector has done most of the work.Things are about to become much tougher for Europe’s big industrial companies. In future, they’ll have to shut down their most polluting plants or make them clean. Much of the technology to do the latter is still in its infancy and is expensive.  By forcing non-EU businesses to pay the same carbon price as local companies via the border tax, the theory is that the EU could cajole other countries into following its climate lead, while ensuring a level  playing field for domestic industry. Naturally, large steelmakers such as ArcelorMittal SA are strongly in favor.Structuring and policing such a tax would certainly be complicated; measuring the carbon content of imported products isn’t simple. There are hints that it will be confined to just a few sectors at first. But the politics are even more nightmarish. Following the U.S. retaliation this week against  France’s digital tax, there’s a danger a carbon border tax would prompt Trump to ratchet up his trade crusades. German industry is particularly worried about this.The EU says any border tax would have to be compliant with World Trade Organization rules. But Brussels needs to tread carefully and Trump isn’t the only worry.A decade ago the bloc tried to impose a carbon tax on flights landing in the EU, regardless of where they took off. International condemnation was brutal and swift. Then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton wrote a letter strongly objecting to the EU’s unilateral approach. The U.S. Senate voted unanimously to block American airlines from complying. Amid fears that China would scrap a multi-billion dollar order for Airbus jets, Europe backed down.(2) Is the EU about to overstep again? Maybe it has no choice. “The world is a different place than it was 10 years ago,” says Andrew Murphy of the research group Transport & Environment. “With smart diplomacy there's no reason why a carbon border adjustment has to suffer the same fate as aviation did.”The urgency is certainly greater now and lots more countries have embraced emissions trading. But only last week China warned the EU against imposing a carbon tax on its exports.Europe shouldn’t let itself be dissuaded. Plenty of smart people think carbon border taxes are necessary, including Ben Bernanke and Alan Greenspan, both former heads of the Federal Reserve. As the birthplace of the industrial revolution, the continent has a unique responsibility to curb planet-heating carbon emissions, including those embedded in goods consumed here but produced elsewhere. So long as net carbon emissions keep rising the planet will keep getting hotter. Countries and companies leading the way shouldn’t be punished for tackling this.(1) For more see this Centre for European Reform paperand this Bruegel blog postand paper. Carbon border taxes are also mentioned in the United Nations' Emissions Gap reportand by the Energy Transitions Commission.(2) Only intra-European flights were subject to emissions trading.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-United orders 50 new Airbus long-range jets to replace Boeing 757s

    United Airlines Holdings Inc announced on Tuesday an order for 50 Airbus SE A321XLR jets to fly between the U.S East Coast and Europe, becoming the latest U.S. airline to ink a deal for the European planemaker's new passenger jet. The long-range A321XLR jets will replace United's 53 Boeing 757-200 planes beginning in 2024, the Chicago-based planemaker said, flying to cities like Porto, Portugal and other potential new destinations. United's 757 planes will reach the end of their lifespan in about a decade and Boeing Co is not building any more of the large single-aisle model.

  • United orders 50 new Airbus long-range jets to replace Boeing 757s
    Reuters

    United orders 50 new Airbus long-range jets to replace Boeing 757s

    United Airlines Holdings Inc announced on Tuesday an order for 50 Airbus SE A321XLR jets to fly between the U.S East Coast and Europe, becoming the latest U.S. airline to ink a deal for the European planemaker's new passenger jet. The long-range A321XLR jets will replace United's 53 Boeing 757-200 planes beginning in 2024, the Chicago-based planemaker said, flying to cities like Porto, Portugal and other potential new destinations. United's 757 planes will reach the end of their lifespan in about a decade and Boeing Co is not building any more of the large single-aisle model.

  • Safran suspends electric jet taxiing project after Airbus ends talks
    Reuters

    Safran suspends electric jet taxiing project after Airbus ends talks

    France's Safran SA has shelved plans to install an electric taxiing system on Airbus A320 jets after the planemaker halted discussions on the project, it chief executive said. Several such projects emerged during a spike in oil prices earlier this decade and have come to the fore again due to pressure to reduce emissions, but development has been hindered by weaker oil prices and shifts in jet flying patterns. Safran acknowledges the system would be uneconomic for long flights because those jets do not spend enough time taxiing to justify carrying the motors, which weigh some 400 kg (882 lb).

  • Boeing 737 Max Faces This New Challenge In Fastest-Growing Aviation Market
    Investor's Business Daily

    Boeing 737 Max Faces This New Challenge In Fastest-Growing Aviation Market

    The troubled Boeing 737 Max is facing a new challenge in India as regulators look to maximize safety after a duo of deadly crashes.

  • Trump Sees No Deadline for China Deal as Trade Risks Roar Back
    Bloomberg

    Trump Sees No Deadline for China Deal as Trade Risks Roar Back

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. President Donald Trump signaled he would be willing to wait for another year before striking a trade agreement with China, casting doubt on the likelihood of a phase-one accord within weeks between Washington and Beijing.“I have no deadline,” he told reporters Tuesday in London when asked if he wanted an agreement by year end. He said later in a meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that he won’t sign a deal unless it’s a “good deal.”“If it’s not going to be a good deal, I’m not signing a deal,” he said. “It can’t be an even deal. If it’s an even deal, it’s no good.”Stocks tumbled in Europe and the U.S. as Trump’s comments indicated no urgency to reach a deal by Dec. 15, which U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross on Monday called a “logical deadline.” The Trump administration has threatened to impose tariffs on more Chinese imports starting that day. Those levies would hit American consumer products such as smartphones, toys and childrens’ clothing.The S&P 500 Index was down about 1.2% at 11:01 a.m. in New York, falling for a third straight day. Treasuries rallied.“I don’t watch the stock market,” Trump said. He regularly issues celebratory tweets when the stock market hits highs.“Jobs are what I watch,” he continued. “I watch: making the proper deal.”A flurry of U.S. trade moves in the past 24 hours has eroded investor optimism that Trump would ease up on tariffs that have slowed the global economy. Rather than ratcheting down trade tensions, Trump is indicating confidence that his import taxes are good for America.“U.S. Markets are up as much as 21% since the announcement of Tariffs on 3/1/2018 - and the U.S. is taking in massive amounts of money (and giving some to our farmers, who have been targeted by China)!” Trump tweeted on Monday.Speaking to reporters on a trip to attend a summit for the 70th anniversary of NATO, Trump suggested that in some ways, it might be better to wait until after the U.S. presidential election next November.“I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal. But they want to make a deal now and we’ll see whether not the deal is going to be right. It’s got to be right,” he said. “The China trade deal is dependent on one thing: Do I want to make it? Because we’re doing very well with China right now and we could do even better with the flick of a pen.”The U.S. and China have been trying to conclude phase one of a trade deal that White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said more than two weeks ago was “coming down to the short strokes.” Stocks have jumped to records on optimism for a truce in an 20-month tariff war between the world’s two largest economies that has led to tariffs on some $500 billion in bilateral trade.Earlier on Tuesday, Chinese state media said the government would soon publish a list of “unreliable entities” that could lead to sanctions against U.S. companies, signaling trade talks between the two nations are increasingly under threat from disputes over human rights in Hong Kong and Xinjiang.(Updates with additional Trump remarks beginning with second paragraph)\--With assistance from Jonathan Stearns and Zoe Schneeweiss.To contact the reporters on this story: Derek Wallbank in London at dwallbank@bloomberg.net;Jordan Fabian in London at jfabian6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chua Baizhen at bchua14@bloomberg.net, Alex Wayne, Justin BlumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Europe Set to Overhaul Its Entire Economy in Green Deal Push
    Bloomberg

    Europe Set to Overhaul Its Entire Economy in Green Deal Push

    (Bloomberg) -- The European Union is gearing up for the world’s most ambitious push against climate change with a radical overhaul of its economy.At a summit in Brussels next week, EU leaders will commit to cutting net greenhouse-gas emissions to zero by 2050, according to a draft of their joint statement for the Dec. 12-13 meeting. To meet this target, the EU will promise more green investment and adjust all of its policy making accordingly.“If our common goal is to be a climate-neutral continent in 2050, we have to act now,” Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, told a United Nations climate conference on Monday. “It’s a generational transition we have to go through.”The commission, the EU’s regulatory arm, will have the job of drafting the rules that would transform the European economy once national leaders have signed off on the climate goals for 2050. The wording of the first draft summit communique, which may still change, reflects an initial set of ideas to be floated by the commission on the eve of the leaders’ gathering.The EU plan, set to be approved as the high-profile United Nations summit in Madrid winds up, would put the bloc ahead of other major emitters. Countries including China, India and Japan have yet to translate voluntary pledges under the 2015 Paris climate accord into binding national measures. U.S. President Donald Trump has said he’ll pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement.In a pitch of her Green Deal to member states and the European Parliament on Dec. 11, von der Leyen is set to promise a set of measures to reach the net-zero emissions target, affecting sectors from agriculture to energy production. It will include a thorough analysis on how to toughen the current 40% goal to reduce emissions by 2030 to 50% or even 55%, according to an EU document obtained by Bloomberg News.Make It IrreversibleIn the next step, the commission will propose an EU law in March that would “make the transition to climate neutrality irreversible,” von der Leyen told the UN meeting. She said the measure will include “a farm-to-fork strategy and a biodiversity strategy” and will extend the scope of emissions trading.The EU Emissions Trading System is the world’s largest cap-and-trade market for greenhouse gases. It imposes pollution caps on around 12,000 facilities in sectors from refining to cement production, including Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BASF SE. Von der Leyen eyes the inclusion of road transport into the market and cutting the number of free emission permits for airlines.Some of the transportation industry’s biggest polluters have already stepped up efforts to reduce their environmental impact. In June, France’s Airbus SE, its U.S. rival Boeing Co. and other aviation companies pledged to reduce net CO2 emissions by half in 2050 compared with 2005 levels. EasyJet Plc, the U.K.-based discount airline, has promised to offset all of its carbon emissions by planting trees and supporting solar-energy projects, while Air France will take similar steps on its domestic routes.Germany’s Volkswagen AG, the world’s largest automaker, aims to become CO2 neutral by 2050, while Daimler AG plans to reach that target for its Mercedes-Benz luxury car lineup by 2039.To ensure that coal-reliant Poland doesn’t veto the climate goals next week, EU leaders will pledge an “enabling framework” that will include financial support, according to the document, dated Dec. 2. The commission has estimated that additional investment on energy and infrastructure of as much as 290 billion euros a year may be required after 2030 to meet the targets.The EU leaders will also debate the bloc’s next long-term budget next week. The current proposal would commit at least $300 billion in public funds for climate initiatives, or at least a quarter of the bloc’s entire budget for the period between 2021 and 2027.(Updates with details on draft sumit communique from fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Ania Nussbaum, Siddharth Philip and Christoph Rauwald.To contact the reporters on this story: Ewa Krukowska in Brussels at ekrukowska@bloomberg.net;Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Airbus SE’s (EPA:AIR) Return On Capital Employed Looks Uninspiring
    Simply Wall St.

    Why Airbus SE’s (EPA:AIR) Return On Capital Employed Looks Uninspiring

    Today we are going to look at Airbus SE (EPA:AIR) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect...

  • U.S. says sees no reason to reduce tariffs in EU aircraft subsidy case
    Reuters

    U.S. says sees no reason to reduce tariffs in EU aircraft subsidy case

    The U.S. Trade Representative's office on Monday said it saw no basis in Monday's World Trade Organization report that would justify reducing U.S. retaliatory tariffs by $2 billion as Europe's Airbus has suggested. "Nothing in today's report even suggests that the (WTO) compliance panel found that the amount has decreased," said a USTR spokesman. USTR earlier said it could increase tariffs on a wider range of European goods after the WTO rejected European Union claims that it no longer provides subsidies to Airbus.

  • Benzinga

    WTO Validates US Tariffs In EU, Airbus Case

    The World Trade Organization has determined that the European Union continues to subsidize the Airbus A350, according to a Monday Reuters report . The finding concludes a second compliance procedure related ...