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  • Fedex slashes prices after ending contract with Amazon
    Yahoo Finance Video1 hour ago

    Fedex slashes prices after ending contract with Amazon

    Fedex cuts prices to attract online retailers after ending its air shipping contract with Amazon, according to the Wall Street Journal. Yahoo Finance's Seana Smith and Jared Blikre discuss.

  • Business owner to Trump: Drop the tariffs
    Yahoo Finance4 hours ago

    Business owner to Trump: Drop the tariffs

    CEO behind Star Wars night-lights calls tariffs devastating and urges President Trump to back down

  • FedEx lures online sellers with two-day air shipping at ground rates after Amazon contract ends
    TechCrunch8 hours ago

    FedEx lures online sellers with two-day air shipping at ground rates after Amazon contract ends

    FedEx is offering the price cut in order to better compete with rival UPS, thereport claims, and to help refactor its product with ecommerce sellers inmind

  • Why Pier 1 Imports, Zoom Video Communications, and Sally Beauty Holdings Slumped Today
    Motley Fool9 minutes ago

    Why Pier 1 Imports, Zoom Video Communications, and Sally Beauty Holdings Slumped Today

    Find out what sent these stocks to significant losses.

  • FedEx Reportedly Makes This Move To Grab Business From UPS
    Investor's Business Daily28 minutes ago

    FedEx Reportedly Makes This Move To Grab Business From UPS

    Shipping giant FedEx reportedly is offering "big" Express price cuts to get online sites to switch from UPS and FedEx Ground. Shares fell ahead of earnings Tuesday.

  • Hedge Funds’ 25 Favorite Blue-Chip Stocks
    Kiplinger48 minutes ago

    Hedge Funds’ 25 Favorite Blue-Chip Stocks

    Always keep one eye on the so-called smart money. Yes, hedge funds don't always live up to the hype, and they're renowned for charging an arm and a leg. But considering they represent more than $3 trillion in assets under management and have built a reputation of having stock-market savvy, it's good to know what they're putting their capital toward - and they're often putting it toward blue-chip stocks.The folks at WalletHub keep regular tabs on stocks that hedge fund managers are buying, selling and holding every quarter. Combing through regulatory filings, WalletHub looks at the positions of more than 400 hedge funds, tallies their positions in individual stocks, then ranks those stocks by their total holdings value.These stocks are massive in market value, ranging from the hundreds of billions of dollars to more than $1 trillion. Indeed, their very size helps attract more institutional interest. Unsurprisingly, then, most of these stock picks are household names - a number happen to belong to Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway portfolio.Here are hedge funds' 25 favorite blue-chip stocks to buy now. All these stocks likely appeal to the "smart money" because of their size and strong track records. But we'll delve into a few specifics that make each company special. SEE ALSO: The 19 Best Stocks to Buy for the Rest of 2019

  • Is Microsoft Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Its Stock Chart Shows
    Investor's Business Daily49 minutes ago

    Is Microsoft Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Its Stock Chart Shows

    Microsoft is a leader in the rapidly expanding cloud-computing market. Here is how Microsoft stock's technicals and fundamentals look before its Q1 report.

  • How Does Amazon Prime Compare to Netflix?
    Market Realist1 hour ago

    How Does Amazon Prime Compare to Netflix?

    Netflix (NFLX) was one of the first players in the online streaming space. Netflix launched its streaming platform back in 2007 and now has over 150 million subscribers worldwide.

  • Amazon, 2 Dow Stocks Among Retail Stocks Near Record Highs
    Investor's Business Daily2 hours ago

    Amazon, 2 Dow Stocks Among Retail Stocks Near Record Highs

    In a tale of two ETFs focused on retail stocks, one is up 16% this year and near new highs, while the other is up 2% and 20% off its high. Why the sharp divergence?

  • Motley Fool2 hours ago

    Amazon, Google and Facebook Warrant Antitrust Scrutiny for Many Reasons – Not Just Because They’re Large

    US lawmakers and regulators are beginning to investigate big tech's growing power, but they need to look beyond size and into their very nature of these three companies (and find different solutions for each).

  • 3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy
    Zacks2 hours ago

    3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy

    Now it's time to check out three tech stocks that came through our screen today that growth investors might want to consider at the moment...

  • When Amazon Attacks: Why Sally Beauty Stock Dropped 13.5%
    Motley Fool3 hours ago

    When Amazon Attacks: Why Sally Beauty Stock Dropped 13.5%

    Amazon.com's entry into the cosmetology market is some ugly news for this beauty company.

  • Best Growth Stocks To Buy And Research
    Investor's Business Daily3 hours ago

    Best Growth Stocks To Buy And Research

    Looking for the best growth stocks to buy? Start by identifying the seven traits of winning stocks, then use IBD screens to find stocks showing them now.

  • MarketWatch4 hours ago

    Microsoft stock rallies toward 8th-straight gain, 6th-straight record

    Shares of Microsoft Corp. surged 0.9% in afternoon trading Monday, putting them on track for an 8th-straight gain, as Oppenheimer technical analyst Ari Wald said the software giant was a "top buy" given the long-term bullish technical backdrop. That would mark the second 8-day win streak this year, and third since it went 9-straight sessions ending Oct. 16, 2017 without a decline. The last time it rose for nine-straight days was the 9-day stretch ending Oct. 21, 2013. Microsoft's stock was also headed toward a 6th-straight record close day. "[Microsoft's stock] checks all our boxes," Wald wrote in a note to clients. "Key positives include the stock's bullish trend, high momentum score and top-down tailwinds based on our view that the technology sector is a prime candidate to be a key driver of the S&P 500's secular advance over the coming quarters to years." The stock has run up 35.4% year to date, as it continues to hold the top spot as the U.S.'s largest company by market capitalization, with a market cap of $1.054 trillion. The company is way ahead of second-place Amazon.com Inc. at $938.7 billion and third-place Apple Inc. at $919.3 billion.

  • Amazon Threat to FedEx Is No Longer ‘Fantastical’
    Bloomberg4 hours ago

    Amazon Threat to FedEx Is No Longer ‘Fantastical’

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- FedEx Corp. may finally be waking up to the threat Amazon.com Inc. poses to its business model.The logistics company is offering big discounts to help fill the planes in its Express delivery network with more e-commerce shipments, according to the Wall Street Journal, which cited people familiar with the matter. The deals are being used to woo customers away from rival United Parcel Service Inc., or to convince them to switch from FedEx’s cheaper ground offerings, the newspaper said, citing people familiar with the matter. For some customers, shipping goods via FedEx’s two-day air service may now cost about the same as shipping them through the ground division.(1)A FedEx spokeswoman told the Wall Street Journal that the company hasn't changed its pricing strategy, adding that the two-day Express service “has been very successful and continues to deliver tremendous value to small and medium businesses competing in the e-commerce market.” Reports of the discounts come just weeks after FedEx said its domestic Express air-delivery unit was dropping Amazon as a customer to focus on "serving the broader e-commerce market." FedEx dropped Amazon as a customer for its Express air-delivery unit to focus on “serving the broader e-commerce market.” The charitable interpretation of that move is that FedEx had found a bit of backbone and was holding a firmer line on pricing with Amazon in an effort to bolster its profit margins. The other possibility is that FedEx recognized that Amazon’s efforts to bring more of its logistics operations in house were real, and that it may want to start the process of breaking up with Amazon before Amazon decides to break up with it. While FedEx CEO Fred Smith has repeatedly painted any notion of Amazon disrupting the logistics industry as “fantastical,” his actions increasingly suggest otherwise. The share of capacity devoted to the time-sensitive legal documents and medical supplies that the FedEx Express network was originally built for will likely continue to shrink. But it’s uneconomical for the division’s fleet – which numbered 670 leased and owned planes at the end of 2018 – to fly partially full or not at all. Meanwhile, FedEx expects U.S. e-commerce demand to grow to 100 million packages per day by 2026. It’s been adamant that Amazon only directly accounts for a small percentage of its overall sales. But Amazon has forever changed the world’s expectations around shopping and delivery. So whether or not its own sales are in the mix, FedEx will be forced to drink more deeply from the firehose of e-commerce shipments to keep its network humming along. And that will come at a cost to margins.FedEx’s decision to prioritize shipments from the likes of Walmart Inc., Target Corp. and Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. gave some analysts hope that it would deliver a greater share of packages to higher-paying business customers and add more density to its delivery routes. But there’s some debate as to whether the Express air-delivery unit as currently constituted still makes sense. Amazon relies on a network of fulfillment and sorting centers close to metropolitan areas to rapidly complete and ship orders, a model that many rival retailers are mimicking in some shape or form as they try to stay competitive. If you’re only going to deliver a package 25 or 50 miles, you’re not going to use a plane to do that. Indeed, when FedEx’s decision to drop Amazon as a U.S. Express customer was first announced, Seaport Global Holdings analyst Kevin Sterling wondered to Bloomberg News whether it was a precursor to the Express unit eventually fading out.Planes still have a role to play: Amazon last week announced an agreement to lease 15 additional Boeing Co. 737-800 converted freighters from General Electric Co.’s jet-lessor arm, adding to an existing agreement for five planes. But FedEx’s reported need to offer discounts to keep the planes it has full calls into question the company’s decision to devote a significant amount of its capital expenditure budget to refreshing its airplane fleet. Management has been clear it’s not expanding capacity at the Express unit, but rather replacing its planes with more efficient options to improve productivity and costs. Downsizing the fleet and reallocating those resources could be a smarter move. The reported pricing cuts – coupled with FedEx’s recently announced plan to offer delivery seven days a week by 2020 and add a fleet of flexible, part-time drivers – reinforce a point both I and my colleague Shira Ovide have long argued: Amazon doesn’t need to steal customers away from FedEx and UPS en masse to be a threat. It’s already forcing both companies to rethink the way they operate. The revenue lost from removing Amazon as an Express customer is relatively minor, but the world the e-commerce giant has created isn’t a hospitable one for the package-delivery incumbents’ profit margins and capital-spending budgets.  (1) News of the discounts weighed on shares Monday, as did a separate shipping issue: FedExhad to issue a second apology to Huawei Technologies over the misrouting of packages, and some reports indicate China is contemplating black-listing it.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TheStreet.com4 hours ago

    Ulta Beauty Loses Sheen as Amazon Details Plans for Its Own Beauty Store

    Something big and pretty just showed up in Ulta Beauty's rear-view mirror. announced the launch of its own beauty product store for professionals, raising the specter of previously unforeseen competition on both pricing and reach in the world of beauty supply products. In a blog post, Amazon announced on Monday that it has opened the Amazon Professional Beauty Store to offer professional stylists, barbers, and estheticians beauty supplies typically found in salons and spas.

  • Lessons from Other Countries: Are Interest Rates the Only Issue?
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    Lessons from Other Countries: Are Interest Rates the Only Issue?

    Last week, the US Federal Reserve in its press release indicated that it's amenable to easing if the situation so warrants. The S&P 500 (SPY), which had already been on an uptrend this month, rose to a record high. But would a rate cut help revive the economy?

  • How Netflix Stacks Up amid Intensifying Streaming Competition
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    How Netflix Stacks Up amid Intensifying Streaming Competition

    While Netflix (NFLX) continues to be a market leader in the streaming space, it's facing competition from Hulu, Amazon Prime (AMZN), the Walt Disney Company (DIS), YouTube (GOOGL), Apple TV, and WarnerMedia (T). Let's look at the overall video streaming market and how these players stack up.

  • Beauty retailers fall after Amazon opens store for professionals
    Reuters5 hours ago

    Beauty retailers fall after Amazon opens store for professionals

    Shares of Sally Beauty Holdings, which targets industry professionals, sank 17%, while those of Ulta Beauty Inc fell about 3%. Last year, U.S. pharmacy chains and drug wholesalers such as CVS, Walgreen and McKesson Corp lost billions in market value when Amazon took its first step into online pharmacy by buying https://www.reuters.com/article/us-pillpack-m-a-amazon-com/amazon-to-buy-pillpack-in-potentially-disruptive-drug-retail-push-idUSKBN1JO1RU small existing player PillPack. Amazon typically uses its scale and online profile to offer a wider range of products at lower prices, putting pressure on margins of existing players.

  • Amazon’s Merchants Are Feeling the Pain of a Trade War With China
    Bloomberg5 hours ago

    Amazon’s Merchants Are Feeling the Pain of a Trade War With China

    (Bloomberg) -- Over the past several years, Shanghai entrepreneur Yung Lin has built a decent business selling wrenches, screwdrivers and other tools on Amazon.com. Then President Donald Trump imposed tariffs on thousands of goods made in China, and Lin faced a difficult choice: eat the additional cost or try and pass it onto his mostly American customers. He chose to raise prices and watched sales of some products dive by as much as one third in just two weeks. Amazon.com Inc. merchants around the world are scrambling to navigate an unpredictable trade war that’s upending their proven business model of buying inexpensive goods in China and selling them at a markup in the U.S. The problem is particularly acute now as Trump weighs another $300 billion worth of tariffs, many on consumer goods.Mom and pop sellers won’t be able to wait for Trump’s decision: They have to place factory orders now and figure out pricing if they want to get their goods made in time for the lucrative Christmas shopping season, when they make as much as half their annual revenue. The most obvious solutions—raising prices, shifting production to other countries, stockpiling inventory—all have costs and complications of their own.These businesses—many of them one-person shops—are especially vulnerable because they lack big companies’ wherewithal to ride out the uncertainty as well as the negotiating power to shift tariff costs onto their suppliers. “The smaller companies have a significant problem,” says Joel Sutherland, Managing Director of the Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego. “We have an administration that says one thing today and does something else tomorrow, which poses tremendous risks.”Amazon is more insulated than the merchants in the near term but it too could take a hit if sales slow and cut into the commissions and fees the company charges merchants to use its online store. The shares were down less than 1 percent at 12:08 p.m. in New York.Much depends on whether the U.S. and China can come to terms. Trump will meet Chinese President Xi Jinping for the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, on June 28-29, and both sides have agreed to resume trade talks after a weeks-long stalemate. But even if they hammer out an agreement, the trading relationship between the world’s two largest economies probably will never be the same.“We’re going to assume the tariffs are here to stay,” says Chuck Gregorich, who sells China-made hammocks, patio furniture and 2,000 other products on Amazon. “We can’t have this happen in a year or two and get caught with our pants down again.”Like many other importers, Gregorich tried to move up orders early last year to beat a Jan. 1 tariff hike on Chinese imports from 10% to 25%. He wound up spending an extra $400,000 on shipping only to see the tariff hike delayed. Burned once by the guessing game, Gregorich  is looking to shift about 30% of his production to factories in Vietnam and elsewhere. He’s not alone. Many other Amazon merchants are considering having their goods made in India, Southeast Asia and Central America. Michael Michelini relocated to China from New York  in 2007 to make Italian coffee presses and upscale bar supplies for U.S shoppers. Eight months ago he decided to move with his wife and kids to Thailand, where he’s working with a new factory to develop a line of high-end kitchenware. “Now when I think of China, I think of risk,” he says.Moving isn’t easy, however. Merchants say finding the right factory, securing raw materials and conducting product quality testing can easily eat up a year. Jerry Kavesh sells cowboys boots and hats on Amazon and recently spent months locating a factory in India that could make his products. But Kavesh discovered he would still have to import raw materials from China, negating any advantage. So as a last resort, he’s cutting his holiday inventory by about 15% and raising prices by about 12%, which he figures will spook enough customers to hurt sales.“When I hear the [U.S.] administration say just move, that's just not realistic,” says Kavesh, the chief executive officer of 3P Marketplace Solutions. “You can’t just suddenly turn all of your production over to someone new.”Even as U.S. sellers try to diversify their manufacturing base, their Chinese counterparts are looking for new customers in Europe, Japan and Australia to offset the potential hit to their U.S. business. “If you are a Chinese seller, money is money,” says Eddie Deng, a former Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. strategist who now runs an online clothing brand called Urbanic that sells Chinese-made, Western-style clothing in India. “It doesn't matter if it's from the U.S., India or the Middle East.”Amazon has said little publicly about the trade war. It wasn’t among 600 businesses including Walmart and Target that wrote the Trump administration earlier this month seeking an end to the trade war because it’s bad for U.S. shoppers. Amazon is a member of the Internet Association trade group, which signed the letter.Behind the scenes, Amazon has agreed to pay some vendors up to 10% more for products affected by tariffs, according to two people familiar with the matter. “Companies of all sizes throughout the supply chain are adjusting to increased costs resulting from new tariffs,” Amazon said in an emailed statement. “We’re working closely with vendors to make this adjustment as smooth as possible.”But that help will apply only to products Amazon buys wholesale and resells itself. The mom and pops that sell directly to consumers on Amazon’s marketplace are on their own.The hardest part is the uncertainty—the temptation to parse Trump tweets in a mostly vain effort to divine the future. “This could all be a head fake,” says Steve Simonson, who sells Chinese-made home goods and electronics and has been scouting factories in India, Vietnam and Central America. “In two months, this could all go away and all of this time and work will be wasted.”(Updates with share price. A previous version of this story corrected name of university in the fourth paragraph.)To contact the authors of this story: Shelly Banjo in Hong Kong at sbanjo@bloomberg.netSpencer Soper in Seattle at ssoper@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Robin Ajello at rajello@bloomberg.net, Edwin ChanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Amazon Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show
    Investor's Business Daily5 hours ago

    Is Amazon Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show

    Amazon stock is edging closer to a record high that would place its market valuation above $1 trillion, as the e-commerce giant keeps pushing into new markets with disruptive thunder.