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Apollo Global Management, Inc. (APO)

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
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40.35-0.80 (-1.94%)
As of 1:04PM EDT. Market open.
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Commodity Channel Index

Commodity Channel Index

Previous Close41.15
Open41.15
Bid40.37 x 900
Ask40.40 x 900
Day's Range40.18 - 41.34
52 Week Range19.46 - 55.39
Volume603,593
Avg. Volume1,374,701
Market Cap9.245B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.52
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.41
Earnings DateOct 29, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.96 (4.82%)
Ex-Dividend DateAug 17, 2020
1y Target Est52.71
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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  • JPMorgan Sees S&P at 3,900 If Trump Wins Election: Taking Stock
    Bloomberg

    JPMorgan Sees S&P at 3,900 If Trump Wins Election: Taking Stock

    (Bloomberg) -- With the final stretch of the election upon us, it’s still nearly impossible to guess how the stock market will react to next week’s vote. One estimate from JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s chief equity strategist puts U.S. stocks in for a double-digit advance if Donald Trump keeps his office.A victory for the Republican candidate could push the S&P 500 to as high as 3,900 at year-end under the most optimistic case laid out by Dubravko Lakos-Bujas, the bank’s chief U.S. equity strategist. The figure, some 300 points above his base-case target for year-end, implies a 12.5% advance from the gauge’s Friday close. While a number of traders have come to consider a Democratic sweep followed by a prompt fiscal deal among bullish scenarios for the equity market, Lakos-Bujas disagrees, seeing Trump’s victory as the most favorable outcome.“A ‘Blue Sweep’ scenario is expected to be mostly neutral in the short term,” JPMorgan’s strategists including Lakos-Bujas said in a report dated Friday. “It would likely be accompanied by some immediate positive catalysts (i.e. larger fiscal stimulus/infrastructure) but also negative catalysts (i.e. rising corporate taxes).”With days left until the election, traders are shrugging off the risk of a contested election -- at least judging by a flattening volatility curve -- corresponding with polls showing a widening lead for Joe Biden over the past month. Near-term uncertainty has remained elevated, with the Cboe Volatility Index stuck near a 30 level for weeks now, likely reflecting concern that sectors of the economy and markets that the candidates have referenced the most could see some wild swings post-election.A quick look at the top constituents of a Biden and Trump baskets of stocks created by JPMorgan, which bet on potential winners from either Democrats or Republicans taking control of Washington, shows the stakes are sky-high. Alternative energy and green-tech stocks in the Biden basket, for instance, have outperformed traditional energy and fossil fuel companies, among the top winners from Trump’s victory, by 84 percentage points since June, data compiled by JPMorgan show.Earlier: Barclays Sees VIX Plunging to Pre-Covid Level in Clear Biden WinFutures on the S&P 500 Index are trading 1% lower following losses in Europe’s Stoxx 600 Index and a dip in the Shanghai Composite Index on the first day Communist Party’s four-day meeting. News over the weekend confirmed a rising number of infections on both sides of the Atlantic, pushing Treasuries and the dollar higher as investors rushed into havens. Futures on the Nasdaq 100 Index are 0.9% lower after Europe’s application software giant SAP SE dropped as much as 21% after cutting its revenue forecast for the full year.Notes From the Sell Side:Apollo Global Management was upgraded to outperform at Evercore ISI, which wrote that recent share-price weakness related to Leon Black’s relationship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein was overdone. Shares down 14% from a peak hit earlier this month, but “this issue will ultimately have limited business impact to the company,” wrote analyst Glenn Schorr. “Plenty of LPs might rightfully put pressure on APO now, but [will] ultimately continue to invest with them.” The firm added that when considering APO as a stock, “investors & LPs should eventually separate the man from the company,” as the company “had no business dealings with the bad guy.”Winnebago Industries was upgraded to buy from neutral at Citi, which wrote that motor homes should continue to see strong demand throughout the pandemic. “A return to extensive travel (planes, cruise, hotels) is several years away, while we believe that the attractiveness of the RV lifestyle is here to stay,” wrote analyst Shawn Collins. The firm added that it was “encouraged” by WGO’s ability to grow its market share.First Solar and SunPower were both downgraded at Credit Suisse, which cited valuation following recent gains. Shares of SunPower are up more than 440% from an April low, and the valuation “already implies strong Ebitda recovery through 2022,” while First Solar is “approaching peak multiples,” Credit Suisse wrote. The firm added that solar manufacturing “will be a cyclical industry with limited tailwinds,” whereas for residential solar, “any multiple expansion/shrinking will rather be driven by supply/demand mismatch.”Sectors in Focus:Dunkin’ Brands shares are up 18% premarket after the Dunkin’ Donuts and Baskin-Robbins parent company confirmed Sunday afternoon that it has held preliminary discussions to be acquired by Inspire Brands.Cenovus Energy on Sunday agreed to buy Husky Energy in a C$3.8 billion all-stock deal that will combine two of the largest players in Canada’s beleaguered oil-sands industry. Watch HSE CN, CVE CN and companies like SU CN, IMO CN for a move.China said it will impose unspecified sanctions on defense contractors Lockheed Martin, a unit of Boeing Co. and Raytheon Technologies after the U.S. approved an arms sale to Taiwan last week, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Monday. Watch BA, LMT and RTX for a move.Watch KO after Barron’s says the beverage company is an under-appreciated post-pandemic reopening play.Your 64-Hour ICYMI:France set a record for new Covid cases, while Spain’s be Italy announced new restrictions. The U.S. reported record coronavirus infections for the second day in a row, adding 85,317 cases. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, and Marty Obst, a close adviser, tested positive for the virus.Alphabet, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft will emerge from the pandemic stronger than ever, despite intensifying antitrust scrutiny in Congress, Barron’s writes in its latest issue. “60 Minutes” finally aired the interview that Donald Trump cut short on Sunday night. Samsung’s billionaire chairman Lee Kun-hee, who made the South Korean company a global powerhouse, has died at 78. A San Francisco judge refused to pause her September order blocking Trump’s ban on Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat.Carlyle Group is nearing an agreement to acquire Siemens AG’s Flender mechanical drive unit for about $2.4 billion, according to people familiar. Airbnb is splitting its privately held shares ahead of a planned initial public offering, according to an internal email.The Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the Tampa Bay Rays on Sunday night to be just one win away from their first World Series title since 1988. UFC lightweight champion Khabib Nurmagomedov announces emotional retirement after latest victory, saying he doesn’t want to keep fighting again following the death of his father, who served as his coach, from the coronavirus.Tick-By-Tick to Today’s Actionable Events:6:30am-- HAS earnings8:30am-- Sept. Chicago Fed Nat Activity Index10am-- Sept. New Home Sales10:30am-- Oct. Dallas Fed Mfg Activity10:30am-- JCAP vote11am-- USDA weekly corn, soybean, wheat export inspections4:05pm-- FFIV, TBI earnings4:15pm-- TWLO earnings8pm-- NXPI earningsQuiet period expires: AVO, LUNG, YALA, OPRH, CD, BQPRCP/ATLKY - Prelim proxy filing deadlineFirst day of China’s Oct. 26 - Oct. 29 plenumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investopedia

    The Most Famous Leveraged Buyouts

    A leveraged buyout refers to the acquisition or takeover of a company where a significant amount of money is borrowed to meet the acquisition cost. Leveraged buyouts, popularly known as LBOs, are commonly carried out by private equity firms.

  • Apollo Investor Revolt Swells Over Black’s Epstein Ties
    Bloomberg

    Apollo Investor Revolt Swells Over Black’s Epstein Ties

    (Bloomberg) -- It keeps getting worse for Leon Black.Over the past week, Black’s giant investment firm, Apollo Global Management Inc., has confronted one question after another about his decades-long relationship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.First, his own board ordered an external review prompted by Black himself. Then a Pennsylvania pension fund paused new investments -- and the state of Connecticut has done the same. One major consultant -- a gatekeeper to $160 billion of investor commitments -- has urged clients to hold off, and another is considering taking similar action.Clients who for years enjoyed some of the best returns on Wall Street are reconsidering their ties to Apollo amid renewed scrutiny over Epstein, spurred by a New York Times report earlier this month and given fresh attention from an unsealed deposition of Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell.Investors distancing themselves from the firm show how serious the issue has become for Black and his general partners. Some clients aren’t convinced that the review, which will be handled by law firm Dechert LLP, will be enough to clear Black’s name, according to people familiar with the matter.A freeze in new money could hurt Apollo at a time when it’s trying to raise $20 billion for several new funds. The pandemic-spurred turmoil in the credit markets is a prime investing opportunity for the firm, which is known for buying struggling businesses. Apollo is seeking to take advantage of market dislocations as well as invest in private debt, people with knowledge of the matter said in April.Black’s growing troubles reflect the changing politics of the investing world, where major funds have become more sensitive to environmental, social and governance matters. The new focus means that even the prospect of lucrative returns may not be enough of a lure in the midst of a scandal.“While performance is always going to be an important factor, increasingly it’s not the only factor,” said Gerald O’Hara, an analyst at Jefferies Financial Group Inc. “In some respects, there’s some willingness to sacrifice performance for a company that’s run with good governance, good ethics.”Investment adviser Aksia told clients not to give new money to Apollo, Bloomberg reported Friday, while Connecticut said it is halting new investments with the firm. Earlier in the week, the Pennsylvania Public School Employees’ Retirement System said it would stop making additional investments in Apollo for now, and consultant Cambridge Associates is considering not recommending the firm to its pension and endowment clients.While Black faced pressure in the immediate aftermath of Epstein’s arrest last year, investor angst was rekindled by a New York Times report that he had wired at least $50 million to Epstein after his 2008 conviction for soliciting prostitution from a teenage girl. The article didn’t accuse Black of breaking the law. Apollo shares have fallen about 12% since the story was published on Oct. 12.“We are firmly committed to transparency,” Apollo said Friday in a statement, noting that Black has been communicating regularly with investors. “Although Apollo never did business with Jeffrey Epstein, Leon has requested an independent, outside review regarding his previous professional relationship with Mr. Epstein.”In a letter to Apollo’s limited partners this month, Black said he deeply regretted having had any involvement with Epstein. Black said he had turned to him for matters such as taxes, estate planning and philanthropy, and that nothing in the Times’ report was inconsistent with an earlier description of their ties.Read more: Leon Black’s Epstein Links Threaten Apollo’s FundraisingIt will be tough for investors to cut ties completely with Apollo as private equity funds typically lock up capital for years -- a trade-off many are willing to make with the promise of high-flying returns. And unless the inquiry unearths something more damning, clients may ultimately decide to look the other way, said three investors who asked not to be identified.It’s particularly unappealing for clients to pull away given the firm’s stellar returns. Apollo’s flagship private equity fund, which opened to investors in 2001, has delivered annual gains of 44%, Bloomberg reported in January.But even yield-starved investors looking to pump more money into private equity may choose to go elsewhere in future, as rivals flood the market with new offerings.“It’s a very competitive race for capital and one thing that we continue to see in fundraising is it is in many ways more similar to a political process than a capital-raising process,” said Sarah Sandstrom, partner at Campbell Lutyens, which helps private equity firms raise money. “You are telling your story, creating relationships with investors.”(Adds previous comment from Black in 12th paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.