AXP - American Express Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
94.84
+1.28 (+1.37%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

96.70 +1.86 (1.96%)
After hours: 7:48PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Gain actionable insight from technical analysis on financial instruments, to help optimize your trading strategies
Chart Events
Bullishpattern detected
Fast Stochastic

Fast Stochastic

Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close93.56
Open93.19
Bid96.00 x 1000
Ask96.70 x 1100
Day's Range92.29 - 95.22
52 Week Range67.00 - 138.13
Volume4,043,245
Avg. Volume6,371,476
Market Cap76.344B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.11
PE Ratio (TTM)14.30
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.72 (1.84%)
Ex-Dividend DateJul 01, 2020
1y Target EstN/A
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
Fair Value
XX.XX
Undervalued
28% Est. Return
Research that delivers an independent perspective, consistent methodology and actionable insight
Related Research
View more
  • Buffett Has Gained $108 Billion on These 5 Stocks
    Motley Fool

    Buffett Has Gained $108 Billion on These 5 Stocks

    In recent years, Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A)(NYSE: BRK.B) CEO Warren Buffett has taken a lot of criticism for underperforming the benchmark S&P 500. According to Berkshire Hathaway's 2019 shareholder letter, the broad-based S&P 500 has gained a cool 19,784%, including dividends paid, over the past 55 years. Comparatively, Berkshire Hathaway's per-share market gain has totaled (drum roll) 2,744,062% over the same period.

  • Why American Express Stock Fell 23.5% in the First Half of 2020
    Motley Fool

    Why American Express Stock Fell 23.5% in the First Half of 2020

    Shares of American Express (NYSE: AXP) fell 23.5% during the first half of 2020, according to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence. The credit card company slid along with the financial sector, which suffered from the economic recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. While American Express isn't quite as exposed to credit losses as some other large banks, lower overall spending still affects its discount fee revenue and earnings.

  • GlobeNewswire

    REPEAT: QuestCap Enters Binding Agreement to Acquire 28% Interest in Colombian Full-Service Medical Clinic

    NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO UNITED STATES NEWSWIRE SERVICES OR FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES TORONTO, July 09, 2020 -- Social-impact investment company QuestCap Inc..

  • MarketWatch

    Dow Inc., American Express share losses lead the way, but Dow flat

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is falling Wednesday afternoon with shares of Dow Inc. and American Express seeing the biggest declines for the blue-chip average. Shares of Dow Inc. (DOW) and American Express (AXP) are contributing to the blue-chip gauge's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 15 points (0.

  • Were Hedge Funds Right About Selling American Express Company (AXP)?
    Insider Monkey

    Were Hedge Funds Right About Selling American Express Company (AXP)?

    How do you pick the next stock to invest in? One way would be to spend days of research browsing through thousands of publicly traded companies. However, an easier way is to look at the stocks that smart money investors are collectively bullish on. Hedge funds and other institutional investors usually invest large amounts of […]

  • Barrons.com

    American Express Is Down 25% This Year. It’s Still Expensive.

    Analyst Jill Shea lowered her rating on American Express (ticker: AXP) to Neutral from Buy and cut her price target to $105 from $110, saying the shares look fairly valued. American Express will cut costs to protect the company’s profitability, but reduced expenses can only go so far, hence the downgrade. Not only does American Express look fully valued, but these headwinds may also prevent the stock’s multiple from expanding—a key driver of share appreciation among credit card stocks in the near term, she writes.

  • MarketWatch

    Dow falls 275 points on losses for shares of Boeing, American Express

    DOW UPDATE Behind negative returns for shares of Boeing and American Express, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is in selloff mode Tuesday afternoon. Shares of Boeing (BA) and American Express (AXP) have contributed to the index's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 279 points, or 1.

  • MarketWatch

    American Express, Boeing share losses contribute to Dow's 200-point fall

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is trading down Tuesday afternoon with shares of American Express and Boeing facing the biggest losses for the index. The Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 207 points, or 0.

  • MarketWatch

    Boeing, American Express share losses contribute to Dow's 140-point fall

    DOW UPDATE Dragged down by negative returns for shares of Boeing and American Express, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is trading down Tuesday morning. Shares of Boeing (BA) and American Express (AXP) are contributing to the blue-chip gauge's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 140 points lower (-0.

  • MarketWatch

    Boeing, American Express share losses lead Dow's 200-point fall

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is falling Tuesday morning with shares of Boeing and American Express seeing the biggest declines for the price-weighted average. The Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 208 points lower (-0.

  • MarketWatch

    Walgreens Boots, Travelers share gains lead Dow's nearly 375-point rally

    DOW UPDATE Behind strong returns for shares of Walgreens Boots and Travelers, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is rallying Monday morning. Shares of Walgreens Boots (WBA) and Travelers (TRV) are contributing to the blue-chip gauge's intraday rally, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 371 points higher (1.

  • As coronavirus cancels July Fourth vacation plans, should you cancel your travel credit card — or redeem air miles for cash?
    MarketWatch

    As coronavirus cancels July Fourth vacation plans, should you cancel your travel credit card — or redeem air miles for cash?

    Before the coronavirus pandemic swept the globe, the Amtrak Guest Rewards World Mastercard was a great deal for David White. White, who lives in Baltimore and works for a software firm, used to ride the train frequently — and with the credit card, he was able to rack up points that he could convert into free tickets. Adding to White’s frustration: The card comes with a $79 annual fee, and there aren’t many competitive options to redeem the rewards points for non-travel-related uses, he said.

  • MarketWatch

    Exxon Mobil, American Express share gains lead Dow's 386-point rally

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is rallying Thursday morning with shares of Exxon Mobil and American Express delivering strong returns for the blue-chip average. Shares of Exxon Mobil (XOM) and American Express (AXP) have contributed to the index's intraday rally, as the Dow (DJIA) is trading 386 points higher (1.

  • Motley Fool

    Stress Test Results Could Lead to Dividend Cuts -- Should Bank Investors Worry?

    The Federal Reserve recently released the results of 2020 bank stress tests, and while no banks are in serious danger, some would see capital levels fall a bit too low for comfort in a prolonged and deep COVID-19 recession. As a result, the Fed issued a formula to govern bank dividends, and there's a real chance bank investors could see dividend cuts from some major financial institutions. In this episode of Industry Focus: Financials, host Jason Moser and Fool.com contributor Matt Frankel, CFP, discuss the news and what it could mean for bank investors.

  • MarketWatch

    Pfizer, Walt Disney share gains contribute to Dow's nearly 150-point jump

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average is climbing Wednesday morning with shares of Pfizer and Walt Disney delivering strong returns for the index. The Dow (DJIA) is trading 147 points higher (0.6%), as shares of Pfizer (PFE) and Walt Disney (DIS) have contributed to the index's intraday rally. Pfizer's shares are up $1.44 (4.4%) while those of Walt Disney are up $3.52 (3.2%), combining for an approximately 34-point boost for the Dow.

  • Facebook Critics Target One Thing CEO Won’t Cede: Control
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Critics Target One Thing CEO Won’t Cede: Control

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg took the unusual step on Friday of publicly broadcasting a weekly Q&A with employees. Over a live video feed, the CEO announced a series of updates to Facebook’s policies around hate speech -- the central topic fueling a growing boycott of Facebook advertising.But the new policies, like labeling posts from public figures who break its terms of service, didn’t assuage critics. The coalition of civil rights groups organizing the boycott called the announcement “a small number of small changes.” Demands like adding a high-ranking executive focused on civil rights, providing face-to-face customer service for hate speech victims and removing extra protections for elected leaders were still unmet.And, though it wasn’t officially included on their public list of proposed changes, the boycott organizers also have a more fundamental complaint: Zuckerberg has too much control.“Mark Zuckerberg has way too much power for a company of this size and reach,” said Arisha Hatch, vice president and chief of campaigns at Color of Change, one of the boycott’s organizers. “He is the one that is blocking progress in this moment.”Zuckerberg, who famously co-founded Facebook as a student before dropping out of Harvard University, has always been the most important person at the company, partly thanks to his out-sized control of its board. Recently, he has consolidated even more power. Since 2018 the founders of Facebook’s other properties, like Instagram and WhatsApp, have left the company, giving Zuckerberg more say over its product empire. And a number of board members -- including former Gates Foundation CEO Susan Desmond-Hellmann and former American Express Co. CEO Kenneth Chenault -- departed in the past two years, many of them over frustrations with Facebook’s corporate governance, according to the Wall Street Journal.For some, the lack of dissenting voices within and around Facebook is worrying. “This behemoth of a company, that’s operating more as a public utility, must be more accountable,” said NAACP CEO and boycott organizer Derrick Johnson.Zuckerberg is not the only important executive at the company. He has long relied on Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg to run Facebook’s business and policy divisions, and he has a number of top executives who advise him. But unlike Twitter Inc., which goes out of its way to say that CEO Jack Dorsey does not make content decisions, Zuckerberg is clearly the final say on all things Facebook.“The way decisions escalate in Facebook are very much what you’d expect in any complex organization where there was a hierarchy,” Nick Clegg, the company’s vice president for global affairs and communications, told reporters earlier this month. “For the most difficult decisions, there’s one ultimate decision maker, our CEO and Chair and Founder, Mark Zuckerberg.”As Facebook’s advertising boycott has grown to include household names like Starbucks Corp., Coca-Cola Co. and Unilever, the social network has fought back with an information campaign intended to demonstrate how much the company already does to fight hate online. Facebook has repeated a series of statistics in interviews and in emails to advertising partners, including that the company detects 90% of the hate speech it removes from the platform before any user even flags it.The company has also been touting a voting information campaign announced earlier this month with the goal of registering 4 million new U.S. voters before the 2020 presidential election. On Friday, Facebook said it would arrange a third-party audit of its quarterly report detailing how much content it takes down for rules violations.But so far, the piecemeal changes have done little to placate the company’s critics. “It’s unclear what the perfect solution is,” said Mark Shmulik, an analyst at Bernstein Securities. “There’s no kind of silver bullet here to fix it -- it’s a very broad, ambiguous problem.”On the larger issues, Facebook has shown little sign of relenting. Diminishing Zuckerberg’s control over the company is almost entirely out of the question. Repeated shareholder proposals to change Facebook’s voting structure or replace Zuckerberg as chairman have failed to clear the company’s board because Zuckerberg himself has voted against them -- the CEO has almost 60% of the vote thanks to a special class of shares unavailable to public investors. The arrangement has raised the question of who, specifically, Zuckerberg is accountable to.“This is where you have a runaway train,” the NAACP’s Johnson said on Monday on Bloomberg Television. “And that runaway train is causing harm to the public and it’s causing harm to our democracy.”The group calling for a Facebook boycott has several demands around removing hateful content that could prove difficult for the company to adhere to. Facebook said it’s already doing the best it can to find and remove posts promoting hate. In an interview on Bloomberg Television Monday, Clegg said Facebook does not profit off hate speech, and that it had an “industry-leading record” when it came to dealing with issues related to the “dark side of the internet.”But Clegg added: “I don’t want to pretend this is an easy straightforward task, that there is a switch we can flick and all hate speech suddenly disappears.”Hate has always been a problem for open platforms, in part because it’s difficult to define. In some cases, a post that clearly appears to be a rules violation to some people, is considered allowable by others. This dynamic played out late last month after a series of posts from President Trump struck many as a clear threat of violence. However, Zuckerberg said the posts were not actually a violation of Facebook’s policies. The posts remained up and untouched, even though Twitter flagged the same language.At Color of Change, Hatch understands that the social network, with more than 2 billion monthly users, probably cannot remove hate speech entirely, but she believes Facebook can do more within its current structure. “Certainly when things are flagged they need to be removed, and certainly when things are coming from the current president or an elected official, it needs to be removed,” Hatch said.Even though the boycott has trimmed billions off Facebook’s market capitalization, it’s not clear how much influence advertisers will have over the company’s processes. Some of the participating companies are heavy spenders, including Starbucks and Unilever, who together spent more than $30 million on Facebook ads during the first six months of the year, according to Pathmatics, a digital marketing analytics company. However, that’s a small amount compared with the almost $35 billion in sales Facebook is projected to report for the same six-month period.The vast majority of the company’s advertisers are small businesses, not name-brand marketers. Smaller companies rely on Facebook’s direct response ads, which drive specific outcomes like a website visit or an app install. Facebook’s top 100 advertisers accounted for roughly $4.2 billion in sales revenue last year, Pathmatics estimates, or just 6% of all Facebook revenue. So far, only a handful of the company’s 100 top-spending advertisers from 2019 are pulling money from Facebook ads.“As important as these advertisers are to Facebook, it would likely take a far broader advertising boycott over a longer period of time to materially impact Facebook’s ad revenue,” Stifel Nicolaus & Co. analysts wrote Monday in a note to investors. Facebook stock ended the day Monday up 2.1% despite the new additions to the ad holdout.Facebook will have more opportunities to try to alleviate concern this week in a series of meetings, including a round table discussion with advertisers and Facebook executives on Tuesday. Color of Change would also like to meet with Facebook this week -- but the group is holding out unless Zuckerberg also attends, a spokesperson said. It’s possible that the boycott, which is formally running through July, could extend further depending on how Facebook responds, Hatch said.“It’s definitely a live, dynamic campaign,” she said. “We’re hopeful we won’t have to make any further adjustments or asks. But that’s up to Facebook really.”(Updates with details on Color of Change meeting in 21st paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • American Express Boosts Small Businesses Hurt by Coronavirus Loss
    Zacks

    American Express Boosts Small Businesses Hurt by Coronavirus Loss

    American Express (AXP) lends a cushion to small business owners who complain of customer attrition as a coronavirus fallout.

  • Restaurants are differentiating products they normally sell consumers: Resy CEO
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Restaurants are differentiating products they normally sell consumers: Resy CEO

    Walter Frye, American Express Vice President of Global Brand Engagement and Ben Leventhal, Resy CEO join Yahoo Finance On The Move to weigh in on how their companies are helping small businesses financially recover during the pandemic.

  • American Express (AXP) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    American Express (AXP) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    American Express (AXP) closed the most recent trading day at $94.52, moving +1.18% from the previous trading session.

  • American Express Launches Its Largest Global Shop Small Campaign
    WWD

    American Express Launches Its Largest Global Shop Small Campaign

    New data found U.S. small businesses need “regulars” to come back in order to survive 2020.

  • TheStreet.com

    American Express Helps Small Businesses With $50 Incentive

    American Express will offer U.S. cardholders up to $50 to encourage them to spend more at small businesses, a media report says.

  • Bloomberg

    AmEx Debuts $50 Perk in Bid to Help Small Businesses Survive

    (Bloomberg) -- American Express Co. will offer U.S. cardmembers as much as $50 to encourage them to spend more at small businesses devastated by the coronavirus pandemic.All cardholders will receive a $5 credit when they spend $10 or more at a small U.S. business, with the option to receive the credit as many as 10 times. American Express has committed more than $200 million to the promotion, part of its largest-ever global campaign to “Shop Small.”American Express crafted the offer after it conducted research that found that 62% of U.S. small businesses needed to see a return of consumer spending by the end of the year in order to stay afloat.“We have the ability to drive that spend into local businesses—we feel this offer is truly going to do that,” Chief Marketing Officer Elizabeth Rutledge said in a phone interview.Rutledge says American Express has been able to push consumers to spend at local shops in the past. The firm’s Small Business Saturday event—a promotion held every year on the Saturday after Thanksgiving—has helped drive $120 billion in spending to U.S. small businesses in the decade since its inception.The pandemic has devastated mom and pop businesses as consumers were ordered to stay home to stem the spread of the deadly virus. The typical small business collected revenue that was 50% lower than a year earlier at the end of March, when the lockdown orders were in effect for much of the country, according to data from JPMorgan Chase & Co.Among the projected beneficiaries of the American Express program are hard-hit independently owned restaurants. The promotion corresponds to a new program from the dining reservation app Resy, which  was purchased by American Express in August 2019 for an undisclosed sum.Resy At Home, which debuted last week, offers food and products from restaurants on the app’s platform across the U.S. In New York, that promotion includes “At Home Specials,” unconventional take-out packages from 16 New York restaurants and bars such as Pasquale Jones and Please Don’t Tell. The package from the popular Italian-American restaurant Don Angie in the West Village includes riffs on some of its bestsellers, such as pepperoni-stuffed garlic flatbread and eggplant Parmesan lasagna ($95 for two people). In Brooklyn, Red Hook Tavern’s 4th of July package will feature corn dogs and house-made cotton candy. All Resy orders are eligible for the $5 credit.For its part, American Express has been retooling rewards on some of its most popular cards to appeal to the types of spending that consumers are doing at home. The firm recently introduced new credits for wireless and streaming services for its Platinum cards, for instance.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Three Companies That Place a High Priority on People

    The relationship between corporate performance and how companies recruit and treat their employees will be a defining factor in ESG considerations. These three companies—Best Buy, Nvidia, and Verizon—have implemented good programs with good results.