BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
180.81
+0.49 (+0.27%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close180.32
Open185.58
Bid181.10 x 1000
Ask181.20 x 900
Day's Range180.43 - 187.79
52 Week Range89.00 - 391.00
Volume41,792,299
Avg. Volume46,211,306
Market Cap102.036B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.45
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-6.03
Earnings DateJul 22, 2020 - Jul 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 13, 2020
1y Target Est174.30
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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  • Barrons.com

    Why Boeing Killed Its 747 Jumbo Jet

    Bloomberg reported Thursday that the commercial aerospace and defense giant (BA) is pulling the plug on its iconic 747 double-decker jumbo jet. “At a build rate of half an airplane per month, the 747-8 program has more than two years of production ahead of it,” a Boeing spokesperson told Barron’s. “We will continue to make the right decisions to keep the production line healthy and meet customer needs.” Not a lot compared with the more than 1,500 jumbo jets Boeing has delivered over time.

  • The Boeing 737 MAX Completes Flight Tests: So What?
    Motley Fool

    The Boeing 737 MAX Completes Flight Tests: So What?

    The 737 MAX is finally close to being cleared for a return to commercial service. It's too bad demand has evaporated.

  • Investing.com

    Point/Counterpoint: The Case for Boeing

    By Geoffrey Smith and Liz Moyer

  • End of the runway for 747 jumbo as Boeing placed final part orders: sources
    Reuters

    End of the runway for 747 jumbo as Boeing placed final part orders: sources

    Boeing Co <BA.N> and suppliers set the final number of parts it would need for the 747 jumbo jet program at least a year ago, signaling the end for a plane that democratized global air travel in the 1970s but fell behind modern twin-engine aircraft, industry sources said on Friday. Boeing's "Queen of the Skies", the world's most easily recognized jetliner with its humped fuselage and four engines, marked its 50-year flying anniversary in February 2019, clinging to life thanks to a cargo market boom fueled by online shopping. The last order for a passenger version came in 2017, when the U.S. government asked Boeing to repurpose two 747-8 jetliners for use as Air Force One by the U.S. president.

  • Boeing signals end of 747 jumbo jet - sources
    Reuters Videos

    Boeing signals end of 747 jumbo jet - sources

    Boeing has signalled the end for the 747 jumbo jet. That's according to sources speaking Friday (July 3). They said the planemaker and its suppliers set the final number of parts it would need for the 747 program at least a year ago. The plane helped democratize global air travel in the 1970s and celebrated its 50-year flying anniversary in 2019. But Boeing's so-called 'Queen of the Skies' fell behind modern twin-engine aircraft in more recent years. The program has seen falling orders and pricing pressures. The virus outbreak also crushed passenger travel and demand for new jets. A cargo market boom fuelled by online shopping kept the plane alive during the last few years...just about. The last order for a passenger version came in 2017. That when the U.S. government asked Boeing to repurpose two jetliners for use as Air Force One by the President. Boeing has refused to confirm whether it is ending the 747 program. If it goes ahead it could mean charges and layoffs for stopping production at its wide-body plant outside Seattle.

  • End of the runway for 747 jumbo as Boeing placed final part orders
    Reuters

    End of the runway for 747 jumbo as Boeing placed final part orders

    Boeing Co <BA.N> and suppliers set the final number of parts it would need for the 747 jumbo jet program at least a year ago, signaling the end for a plane that democratized global air travel in the 1970s but fell behind modern twin-engine aircraft, industry sources said on Friday. Boeing's "Queen of the Skies", the world's most easily recognized jetliner with its humped fuselage and four engines, marked its 50-year flying anniversary in February 2019, clinging to life thanks to a cargo market boom fueled by online shopping. The last order for a passenger version came in 2017, when the U.S. government asked Boeing to repurpose two 747-8 jetliners for use as Air Force One by the U.S. president.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-Air France and HOP! airlines to cut 7,580 jobs

    Air France plans to cut just over 7,500 jobs following the coronavirus-related collapse in air travel, the flag carrier said on Friday. The cuts include 6,560 jobs at the main airline by the end of 2022, more than 3,500 of which will come through natural departures due to the age of its 41,000-strong workforce. Another 1,020 jobs will go at sister airline "HOP!", Air France said after talks with unions, adding that it would give priority to voluntary arrangements and early retirements.

  • Boeing Set to Discontinue the Production of 747 Jumbo Jets
    Zacks

    Boeing Set to Discontinue the Production of 747 Jumbo Jets

    Boeing's (BA) 747 jets have been replaced by other narrow-body and cost-effective jets, such as the 777 and 787, and Airbus' A330 and A350 jets, over the years.

  • Embraer union seeks planemaker's board ouster after failed Boeing deal
    Reuters

    Embraer union seeks planemaker's board ouster after failed Boeing deal

    A union representing workers at Embraer filed a lawsuit on Friday seeking to dismiss the company's board, after a $4.2 billion deal with Boeing Co <BA.N> collapsed amid the pandemic, claims the Brazilian planemaker said were an act of "bad faith." Embraer said the union was "using unfounded allegations and distorting information in order to confuse public opinion and the company's workers." The lawsuit is the latest headache for Embraer in the aftermath of its breakup with Boeing.

  • Reuters

    Embraer union sues to oust planemaker's board after failed Boeing deal

    A union representing workers at planemaker Embraer filed a lawsuit on Friday seeking to dismiss the company's board, after a $4.2 billion deal with Boeing Co collapsed amid the pandemic, leaving the Brazilian jetmaker scrambling for a new path forward. The lawsuit is the latest headache for Embraer in the aftermath of its breakup with Boeing. Under the deal signed in 2018, Boeing was going to buy the majority of Embraer's commercial aviation unit in order to take on Airbus in the mid-range jet segment.

  • Raytheon Wins $495M Deal to Support AMRAAM Weapon System
    Zacks

    Raytheon Wins $495M Deal to Support AMRAAM Weapon System

    Raytheon Technologies (RTX) is set to offer non-warranty repairs, program support, contractor logistics support and service life prediction program analysis, supporting the AMRAAM weapon system

  • Boeing communications chief resigns over decades-old article on women in combat
    Reuters

    Boeing communications chief resigns over decades-old article on women in combat

    Boeing Co's communications chief Niel Golightly abruptly resigned on Thursday, following an employee's complaint over an article the former U.S. military pilot wrote 33 years ago arguing women should not serve in combat. The job has become the industry's biggest hot seat as Boeing fends off criticism for its handling of the 737 MAX crisis. "My article was a 29-year-old Cold War navy pilot's misguided contribution to a debate that was live at the time," Golightly said in a statement included in Boeing's announcement.

  • Boeing to Wind Down 747 Production, a Report Says
    Motley Fool

    Boeing to Wind Down 747 Production, a Report Says

    Boeing (NYSE: BA) reportedly plans to wind down production of its massive 747 jumbo jet, the end of an era for double-decker jets as airlines focus on smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft. The company has not yet made the decision official, but Bloomberg reported the last 747-8 will roll off Boeing's assembly line in about two years. While the timing of Boeing's decision is new, the fate of the 747 has been obvious for a while.

  • Brazil's Embraer negotiates worker buyouts as rivals downsize
    Reuters

    Brazil's Embraer negotiates worker buyouts as rivals downsize

    The world's No. 3 planemaker Embraer SA <EMBR3.SA> said on Thursday it was negotiating buyouts, signaling likely cuts in its workforce due to the coronavirus pandemic that has hammered the travel industry. Larger rivals Boeing Co <BA.N> and Airbus <AIR.PA> have each announced plans to cut over 10,000 jobs, although the French planemaker is still negotiating due to government pressure. Embraer said it is discussing with some of its unions the possibility of offering buyouts for workers who are currently furloughed.

  • Boeing to pull the plug on its 747 jumbo jet: Bloomberg News
    Reuters

    Boeing to pull the plug on its 747 jumbo jet: Bloomberg News

    The 747 democratized global air travel in the 1970s but fell behind modern twin-engine passenger jets. The last 747-8 will roll out of a Seattle area factory in about two years, according to the Bloomberg report. When contacted by Reuters, Boeing did not confirm the Bloomberg report.

  • Dow Jones Rises on Jobs Report; Apple and McDonald's Hit the Brakes; Exxon Discloses Big Earnings Hit; Boeing's 737 Max Certification Flights Complete
    Motley Fool

    Dow Jones Rises on Jobs Report; Apple and McDonald's Hit the Brakes; Exxon Discloses Big Earnings Hit; Boeing's 737 Max Certification Flights Complete

    The Dow's rally drove shares of Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL), McDonald's (NYSE: MCD), ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM), and Boeing (NYSE: BA) higher despite mixed news. Apple and McDonald's pulled back on store reopening plans due to a surge in COVID-19 cases, Exxon disclosed that it would take a large earnings hit in the second quarter, and the FAA completed certification test flights for Boeing's 737 Max.

  • Boeing Quietly Pulls Plug on the 747, Closing Era of Jumbo Jets
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Quietly Pulls Plug on the 747, Closing Era of Jumbo Jets

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. hasn’t told employees, but the company is pulling the plug on its hulking 747 jumbo jet, ending a half-century run for the twin-aisle pioneer.The last 747-8 will roll out of a Seattle-area factory in about two years, a decision that hasn’t been reported but can be teased out from subtle wording changes in financial statements, people familiar with the matter said.It’s a moment that aviation enthusiasts long have dreaded, signaling the end of the double-decker, four-engine leviathans that shrank the world. Airbus SE is already preparing to build the last A380 jumbo, after the final convoy of fuselage segments rumbled to its Toulouse, France, plant last month.Yet for all their popularity with travelers, the final version of the 747 and Europe’s superjumbo never caught on commercially as airlines turned to twin-engine aircraft for long-range flights. While Boeing’s hump-nosed freighters will live on, the fast-disappearing A380 risks going down as an epic dud.The grand jetliners also face another indignity: The Covid-19 pandemic threatens to leave their manufacturers scrounging to find buyers for the last jumbos built.“As it turned out, the number of routes for which you need an ultralarge aircraft are incredibly few,” said Sash Tusa, an analyst with Agency Partners.Boeing’s “Queen of the Skies” debuted in 1970, an audacious bet that transformed travel but almost bankrupted the company. Passenger versions boasted a spiral staircase to a luxurious upstairs lounge. Freighter models featured a hinged nose that flipped open to load everything from cars to oil-drilling gear. The 747 went on to rack up 1,571 orders over the decades -- second among wide-body jets only to Boeing’s 777.The millennial-era A380 could haul as many as 853 travelers and reflected Europe’s lofty aerospace ambition. But by the time it arrived in 2007, airlines were already tilting to smaller planes that burned less fuel.Boeing correctly anticipated the trend with the twin-engine 777 and the 787 Dreamliner. With prodding from Joe Sutter, a famed engineer who’d led the original 747 program, the planemaker decided to develop a relatively inexpensive upgrade of the four-engine plane to steal sales from the A380.The strategy would have been successful, had the 747-8 not been bedeviled by early mismanagement, blowing its budget and deadlines, said Richard Aboulafia, an analyst with Teal Group.The Chicago-based company has lost about $40 million for each 747 since 2016, when it slowed production to a trickle, making just six jets a year, Jefferies analyst Sheila Kahyaoglu estimated. All told, Boeing has recorded $4.2 billion in accounting charges for the 747-8, which has been kept alive as a freighter. The 747 notched its last order as a passenger jet in 2017 -- for Air Force One.Boeing’s jumbo freighters will continue to ply the skies for decades after production stops, said Aboulafia. But he’s dropped the passenger-only A380 from his forecasts.“It’s going to have the shortest lifespan of any type in history,” Aboulafia predicted. “I’d be shocked if there’s still an A380 in service in 2030.”Airbus disagreed. “We will see the A380 continue flying for many years,” the planemaker said by email.But the coronavirus pandemic is hastening the end of the behemoths as people movers. With travel not expected to fully recover until mid-decade, airlines are culling aging jetliners and four-engine jumbos from fleets to limit spending. About 91% of 747s and 97% of A380s are parked, Credit Suisse estimated last month.Air France, Lufthansa, and Qatar Airways are among carriers weighing whether to ground their A380s permanently or are preparing to do so. Airbus has just nine of the planes still be delivered. All but one of them are tagged for Emirates Airline, the largest A380 operator, which is considering whether to scrap its final five on order.The A380 has cost Airbus about 20 billion euros ($23 billion), breaking even or generating profits for only a three-year stretch starting in 2015, Agency Partners estimated. With just 251 aircraft sold over the program’s life, the planemaker never achieved the efficiency that comes with manufacturing at large scale, Tusa said.Boeing, meanwhile, had been preparing for years to wind down the 747 program, and its sales team has been sounding out customer interest in a potential freighter version of the 777X. If such a model goes forward, it would bolster flagging sales of the largest twin-engine aircraft in the company’s lineup.The telling omen that Boeing had written the iconic 747’s final chapter came in financial filings earlier this year. Gone was any indication that the company would continue to “evaluate the viability” of the program, standard phrasing it had previously used.“At a build rate of half an airplane per month, the 747-8 program has more than two years of production ahead of it in order to fulfill our current customer commitments. We will continue to make the right decisions to keep the production line healthy and meet customer needs,” Boeing said for this story.The planemaker has just 15 unfilled orders for the 747 -- all freighters. A dozen of them are headed to United Parcel Service Inc., and the fate of the rest is unclear, part of a dispute with Russia’s Volga-Dnepr Group.Boeing has approached the U.S. courier and other potential customers about taking the three planes, people familiar with the matter said. The planemaker and UPS declined to comment. Volga-Dnepr didn’t respond to requests for comment.UPS in May agreed to take a 747 that Volga had ordered. “Working with Boeing, we saw an opportunity to bring another 747-8 online this year in time for our peak shipping season,” the courier said.Ultimately, Boeing’s decision on the 747 boiled down to resource allocation, said George Dimitroff, who leads valuations at aviation consultant Cirium. Could the assembly line floor space be better used on another airplane, such as the 767, which shares a bay in Boeing’s Everett, Washington, factory?“If you’re building half an airplane a month, it’s probably not your most profitable program,” Dimitroff said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    The FAA Is Done Testing Boeing’s 737 MAX. A Video Gives Investors a Look.

    The Federal Aviation Administration outlined what is left to complete before the planes can fly again in commercial service.

  • Barrons.com

    Tesla Stock Soars as Dow Climbs Ahead of Jobs Data

    The shortened trading week means that both weekly unemployment claims and the June employment report will be released by the Labor Department simultaneously.

  • General Electric Is Still Playing a Losing Hand
    InvestorPlace

    General Electric Is Still Playing a Losing Hand

    In early June, it appeared all the tumblers were coming into place for General Electric (NYSE:GE). After over a year of cost cutting and streamlining, the company looked like things might be turning around. In the first five trading days of June, GE stock climbed over 25%, nearly in lockstep with Boeing (NYSE:BA) stock.Source: Sundry Photography / Shutterstock.com But in this case, what goes up fast can come down just as hard. And in the case of GE stock, the stock has given up all of its gains as new cases of the novel coronavirus are threatening to cool the embers of the economic recovery.In the past, General Electric was a stock that investors ran to in times of economic uncertainty. But in those days, GE was in defensive industries and offered a strong dividend. That's not the reality of GE today.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy Keeping Lights On And Dividends Flowing The company reshuffled the deck, but for now, there's nothing in their hand that makes me want to invest. The Novel Coronavirus Came at a Really Bad TimeIn the company's first-quarter earnings call, chief executive officer Larry Culp confirmed what many investors already knew. It's going to be rough sledding for GE in the next quarter. And that the company was facing some challenging times.So let me tell you what we do know. The second quarter will be the first full quarter with pressure from COVID-19, and we expect that our financial results will decline sequentially before they improve later this year. The bottom line is we have some challenging times ahead …I had my doubts, but I've been impressed with the discipline and execution that Culp has brought to GE. He had an unenviable job and has accomplished a great deal. It's been no small feat winning back the trust of analysts. But in addition to getting the company's financial house in order, Culp has streamlined the business.Right now, the company is still a conglomerate, but the parts seem to relate better. But the underlying question is whether the whole is greater than the parts. This Is Not Your Parents General ElectricLarry Ramer writes about General Electric's future-facing portfolio. The company is operating in many areas that represent the future of our nation. The electric power grid, wind turbines, digital technology, and renewable energy are all part of the company's product portfolio. And with core offerings in health care and aviation, it seems that the company would be a sexy pick among industrial stocks. That would probably be true if this were 2017 or 2018.But right now, the economy is struggling to get off its back. Yes, we had an encouraging May jobs report, and the June numbers may also be encouraging. However, the economy is still trying to recover from the novel coronavirus. And while it may not require one of GE's ventilators, it's not going to be the V-shaped recovery some had hoped.The General Electric of Jack Welch was perhaps the ultimate defensive stock. Today, the company needs a robust economy for success. And that's probably at least a year away. The simple truth is that Culp was dealt a bad hand in the midst of a robust economy. He's played that hand really well all things considered, but without a vibrant economy, the company looks stuck in neutral. GE Stock Looks About RightInvestors don't seem to have a lot of conviction on GE stock one way or the other. They seem to be building a line of support at around $6.50. But the immediate question is if there's any reason to believe investors will send the stock back to around $8.50. And then the other question is that really enough incentive to buy the stock right now?The company did pay its greatly reduced dividend. But at a single penny per share, GE has a long way to go to return to its days as a dividend darling.With all that said, I think GE stock could be a long-term option. But until business conditions improve across all areas, there's really no reason to initiate a position.Chris Markoch is a freelance financial copywriter who has been covering the market for over five years. He has been writing for InvestorPlace since 2019. As of this writing, Chris Markoch did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * Why Everyone Is Investing in 5G All WRONG * America's 1 Stock Picker Reveals His Next 1,000% Winner * Revolutionary Tech Behind 5G Rollout Is Being Pioneered By This 1 Company * Radical New Battery Could Dismantle Oil Markets The post General Electric Is Still Playing a Losing Hand appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Barrons.com

    The Transportation Department Issued a Boeing 737 MAX Report. Here’s What It Says.

    A Transportation Department report issued Wednesday addresses the company’s actions and regulators’ responses during the certification process for the plane.

  • Reuters

    UK says: wants to be first with carbon zero Atlantic commercial plane

    The United Kingdom wants to be the first to develop a commercial jet plane to fly across the Atlantic Ocean without any carbon emissions, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said on Thursday. Prime Minister Boris Johnson surprised some in the aviation sector on Tuesday when he promised the United Kingdom would produce the world’s first zero emission long haul passenger plane. "We've set up the JetZero council specifically to take forward the objective of being the first country to develop a jet commercial airliner to fly zero carbon across the Atlantic," Shapps told the British parliament.

  • U.S. regulator, Boeing complete 737 MAX certification test flights
    Reuters

    U.S. regulator, Boeing complete 737 MAX certification test flights

    The Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing Co have completed certification test flights on the 737 MAX, a key milestone toward the plane's return to service, the U.S. regulator said on Wednesday. The MAX has been grounded since March 2019 after two fatal crashes in five months killed 346 people. "The agency is following a deliberate process and will take the time it needs to thoroughly review Boeing's work," the FAA said.