BAS.DE - BASF SE

XETRA - XETRA Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
55.19
+3.27 (+6.30%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close51.92
Open53.32
Bid55.11 x 139300
Ask55.12 x 16500
Day's Range52.95 - 55.20
52 Week Range37.35 - 72.17
Volume6,982,366
Avg. Volume6,140,298
Market Cap50.691B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.26
PE Ratio (TTM)5.57
EPS (TTM)9.90
Earnings DateJul 29, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield3.30 (6.36%)
Ex-Dividend DateJun 19, 2020
1y Target EstN/A
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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      RPT-U.S. senators weigh additional sanctions on Russia's Nord Stream 2

      Two U.S. senators said on Wednesday they could draft further sanctions on Russia's Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline if Moscow finishes laying pipes for the project. U.S. sanctions legislation originally sponsored by Senators Ted Cruz, a Republican, and Jeanne Shaheen, a Democrat, in December halted work by Swiss-Dutch company Allseas on the pipeline that aims to boost Russia's gas exports under the Baltic Sea to Germany. The pipeline, aimed at bypassing Ukraine, could be launched by the end of 2020 or early next year, Russian President Vladimir Putin has said.

    • Reuters

      U.S. senators weigh additional sanctions on Russia's Nord Stream 2

      Two U.S. senators said on Wednesday they could draft further sanctions on Russia's Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline if Moscow finishes laying pipes for the project. U.S. sanctions legislation originally sponsored by Senators Ted Cruz, a Republican, and Jeanne Shaheen, a Democrat, in December halted work by Swiss-Dutch company Allseas on the pipeline that aims to boost Russia's gas exports under the Baltic Sea to Germany. The pipeline, aimed at bypassing Ukraine, could be launched by the end of 2020 or early next year, Russian President Vladimir Putin has said.

    • Reuters

      Printing ink maker Flint nears debt deal ahead of planned sale -sources

      The world's second-largest printing ink maker, Flint Group, is nearing a debt deal seen as a pre-condition to proceed with a sales process that its owners launched last year, people close to the matter said. Flint Group has seen its supply chains affected and sales decrease during the coronavirus pandemic and expects its 2020 earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization to fall from the 266 million in 2019, the sources said. The company, owned by Goldman Sachs' private equity arm and U.S.-based conglomerate Koch Industries, has engaged with its lenders to put its financing on a new footing, the people said.

    • Reuters

      German chemicals industry sees coronavirus hitting 2020 revenue

      German chemicals association VCI on Wednesday said it expected production and revenues in the chemical and pharmaceutical sectors to drop this year, citing declining orders and supply chains disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. Christian Kullmann, president of the association that represents chemical and pharmaceutical firms with operations in Germany, said: "2020 will be a difficult year."

    • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

      Edited Transcript of BAS.DE earnings conference call or presentation 30-Apr-20 7:00am GMT

      Q1 2020 BASF SE Earnings Press Conference

    • Reuters

      EU to halve pesticides by 2030 to protect bees, biodiversity - draft

      The European Commission is seeking to halve the use of chemical pesticides by 2030 to halt the decline of pollinators, in a plan likely to draw criticism both from those urging a phase-out of the substances and from farmers who say crop yields will suffer. The Commission, the EU executive, wants to commit the European Union to a halving of the use of chemical and "high-risk" pesticides by 2030, a draft document seen by Reuters and set to be published on May 20 showed. Beekeepers in western Europe have reported a fall in the number of bees and colony losses over the last 15 years, the European Food Safety Authority said.

    • Moody's

      Wintershall Dea Finance B.V. -- Moody's changes Wintershall Dea's outlook to negative, affirms the Baa2 rating

      Moody's Investors Service, ("Moody's") changed today the rating outlook for Wintershall Dea GmbH (Wintershall Dea) to negative from stable. Moody's also affirmed Wintershall Dea's ratings, including its Baa2 issuer rating and the Baa2 instrument ratings on the group's senior unsecured bank credit facilities.

    • Reuters

      Germany tasks its big international companies with procurement challenge

      German companies with international experience and supply chains have been commissioned to help the government procure difficult-to-obtain supplies as part of the country's response to the coronavirus crisis, a government document showed. Essential equipment like protective masks are in short supply around the world due to the spike in demand caused by the pandemic.

    • Moody's

      Brazoria County Brazos River Hrbr. Nav. Dist. -- Moody's places BASF's A2/P-1 ratings on review for downgrade

      Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has today placed the A2 senior unsecured notes ratings and (P)A2 senior unsecured MTN programme ratings of BASF (SE) (BASF or "the company") and its guaranteed subsidiary BASF Finance Europe NV on review for downgrade. It has also placed on review for downgrade the A2 unsecured rating of revenue bonds guaranteed by BASF.

    • North America farm suppliers race COVID-19 spread for planting season
      Reuters

      North America farm suppliers race COVID-19 spread for planting season

      WINNIPEG, Manitoba/CHICAGO, March 26 (Reuters) - North America's biggest farm suppliers are accelerating shipments of fertilizer, seeds and agricultural chemicals to crop-growing regions in an unprecedented race against the coronavirus that threatens to disrupt planting season. The timing could not be worse for farmers preparing to plant crops. Disruptions in deliveries of fertilizer, seeds or chemicals could reduce harvests and incomes for U.S. farmers who were hoping this year to sell more crops to China under the terms of a trade agreement signed in January.

    • Moody's

      DIC Corporation -- Moody's assigns Ba1 CFR to DIC Corporation and withdraws Baa3 issuer rating; outlook stable

      Moody's Japan K.K. has assigned a Ba1 corporate family rating (CFR) to DIC Corporation and has withdrawn the company's Baa3 issuer rating. More specifically, the weaknesses in DIC's credit profile, including its exposure to end markets, such as automotive and electronics, has left it vulnerable to shifts in these unprecedented operating conditions, and DIC remains vulnerable to continuing impact from the spread. Moody's regards the coronavirus outbreak as a social risk under its ESG framework, given the substantial implications for public health and safety.

    • Bayer's top seed faces U.S. soybean challenge from Corteva
      Reuters

      Bayer's top seed faces U.S. soybean challenge from Corteva

      CHICAGO/WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) - Bayer AG's takeover of Monsanto has been beset by problems, and now a decades-long dominance of the $4 billion U.S. soybean seed market is under threat from rival Corteva Inc. Bayer <BAYGn.DE> told Reuters it expects plantings of its genetically modified Xtend soybean seeds to flatline this year for the first time, after three years of strong growth since their launch with an accompanying weed-killer. Meanwhile Corteva <CTVA.N>, formed last year from the agricultural units of Dow Chemical and DuPont, expects its Enlist E3 seed to make up 20% of the U.S. crop in 2020, the first year it has been widely available.

    • FOCUS-Bayer's top seed faces U.S. soybean challenge from Corteva
      Reuters

      FOCUS-Bayer's top seed faces U.S. soybean challenge from Corteva

      CHICAGO/WINNIPEG, Manitoba, March 4 (Reuters) - Bayer AG's takeover of Monsanto has been beset by problems, and now a decades-long dominance of the $4 billion U.S. soybean seed market is under threat from rival Corteva Inc. Bayer told Reuters it expects plantings of its genetically modified Xtend soybean seeds to flatline this year for the first time, after three years of strong growth since their launch with an accompanying weed-killer.

    • BASF flags risk of lower earnings on virus hit
      Reuters

      BASF flags risk of lower earnings on virus hit

      Germany's BASF warned that earnings could drop further this year after the fallout from the coronavirus outbreak has started to weigh on demand from its industrial customers. The world's largest chemicals company by sales said on Friday that the virus heightened uncertainty in the global economy in January and February, and it does not expect trade conflicts between the United States and its trading partners to ease further. "The coronavirus has added a new factor that is considerably hampering growth at the beginning of the year, especially in China," said Martin Brudermueller, chief executive officer of BASF.

    • Bloomberg

      Europe's Coronavirus Plan Is Not Enough

      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The economic damage from the Coronavirus epidemic has prompted calls for Europe to relax its fiscal rules to allow governments to cut taxes and increase spending. The European Commission seems to agree: Paolo Gentiloni, its economy tsar, has hinted that affected governments — such as Italy — may enjoy some budget “flexibility” to deal with the emergency.Granting more leeway is a welcome step, but it’s only a second-best approach. The virus risks affecting some countries much more than others. A centralized euro-zone budget would be a better way to address these localized difficulties, since it would allow the channeling of funds to countries where it was most needed. Some governments have much less fiscal space that others — think of Italy, which is struggling with the continent’s worst coronavirus outbreak. It’s unfortunate that a euro-area pot of money does not exist for this kind of eventuality; instead, some member states will be forced to borrow more even when they have very high levels of public debt.The impact from the Covid-19 on the euro zone isn’t yet visible in the macroeconomic data, but many businesses are warning that the impact will be severe. The chemicals giant BASF SE was the latest to do so, on Friday. Companies face a damaging combination of disruptions to their supply chains and a slowdown in demand — both from outside the single-currency area and from within. Europe’s stocks are tumbling and are set for their worst week since the region’s sovereign debt crisis in 2011.The virus has spread across Europe, but some nations are bearing a greater brunt. Italy has had to lock down two areas, home to about 50,000 people, where the country’s outbreak begun. The region of Lombardy, which produces an estimated 22% of the country’s gross domestic product, has taken draconian steps to contain the epidemic such as closing schools and other public spaces. Other northern regions have done the same. Ignazio Visco, governor of the Bank of Italy, believes the crisis could shed as much as one-quarter of a percentage point from this year’s growth rate.Rome is preparing a set of measures to help companies and workers hit by the crisis. The trouble is that Italy faces severe budget deficit limits, given its high public debt — which stands at about 135% of GDP. In 2018, Italy locked horns with Brussels, as it sought to push for borrowing levels that the Commission deemed excessive. The fear is that a fiscal stimulus to counter the slowdown might provoke a similar backlash if the Italians or anyone else are deemed to be spending recklessly.The Commission appears open-minded about giving Rome — and other countries in need — more leeway on their EU-imposed budgetary limits to support the economy. That’s wise. The euro zone has relied heavily on monetary policy to foster a recovery, so the European Central Bank has less room to act than in the past. Governments can tailor fiscal policy to their own country’s needs, depending on how the severity of the economic damage.However, a country’s ability to react will depend entirely on its own fiscal space. Germany will have greater room for maneuver —  if it chooses to act — than Spain or Italy because its debt is much lower. This is why the approach has serious shortcomings, since the virus will strike anywhere, regardless of a country’s economic situation (at least within the euro zone). The best tool to respond would be a central fiscal capacity, which distributes resources depending on a country’s needs.So far, the dream of a euro-area budget has proven elusive because thrifty countries such as Germany have feared other member states would squander the money. The “Budgetary Instrument for Convergence and Competitiveness”, which was agreed at the end of last year (though is not yet in place) is expected to be tiny, and in any event cannot be used to help countries deal with an economic shock. The coronavirus epidemic shows the limits of not having more meaningful instrument. It would be far better if countries chose to build an insurance mechanism to help each other, as recommended by the International Monetary Fund and Mario Draghi, former ECB president.It’s still possible that the damage from the Coronavirus will prove temporary, and that the euro zone will experience a “V-shaped” recovery. The ECB says it’s ready to step in, cutting rates further into negative territory if the slowdown is worse than feared.Europe’s politicians should sharpen their fiscal tools. It’s a pity they’re inadequate for this challenge.To contact the author of this story: Ferdinando Giugliano at fgiugliano@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ferdinando Giugliano writes columns on European economics for Bloomberg Opinion. He is also an economics columnist for La Repubblica and was a member of the editorial board of the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • Benzinga

      Dollar Volume In GBTC More Than Doubled In January, As Coronavirus Fears Spurred A Crypto Rally

      Nearly $24 billion worth of shares traded on OTC Markets last month, down about 2% from December. There were a number of significant volume increases in individual securities throughout the month, with ...

    • Reuters

      European shares edge higher amid China support measures

      European shares inched higher on Monday as fresh attempts by China to limit the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak helped calm investor nerves. The pan-European STOXX 600 index rose 0.3% in early trade, staying slightly below a record high of 432.26 touched last week. Market activity is expected to be light through the rest of the day on account of a U.S. holiday.

    • U.S. peach grower awarded $265 million from Bayer, BASF in weedkiller lawsuit
      Reuters

      U.S. peach grower awarded $265 million from Bayer, BASF in weedkiller lawsuit

      A jury in U.S. District Court in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, handed Bader, the state's largest peach farmer, $15 million in actual and $250 million in punitive damages. The three-week trial was the first case in the United States to rule on the use of dicamba-based herbicides alleged to have damaged tens of thousands of acres of U.S. cropland. The herbicide can become a vapor and drift for miles when used in certain weather, farmers have claimed.

    • Reuters

      Bayer to appeal $265 mln U.S. damages award on dicamba weedkiller

      German agrochemicals group Bayer said on Sunday it would appeal a U.S. jury's $265 million damages award against it and BASF in favour of a Missouri farmer who said the company's dicamba herbicide had destroyed his peach orchards. The jury award, the first of more than 140 dicamba cases to come to trial, is separate to multi-billion-dollar litigation Bayer is trying to settle over the Roundup weedkiller made by Monsanto, the U.S. firm it took over for $63 billion in 2018. Monsanto made both Roundup and dicamba, and Bayer is being sued over both products.

    • Reuters

      BASF diverts products from Chinese customers due to coronavirus disruption

      German chemical giant BASF diverted some products to Europe from its Chinese clients following a coronavirus outbreak that has disrupted logistics and delayed factories from resuming operations. Shanghai BASF Polyurethane Co, a joint venture of BASF and China's Sinopec Assets Management Corp and Shanghai Huayi Group Co, provisionally exported 3,150 tonnes of toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a raw material widely used in automobile and construction, to Europe, said China's customs on Friday.

    • Reuters

      Canadian court orders major agriculture firms to hand over documents in antitrust probe

      A Canadian federal court has ordered a group of major agriculture companies to hand over records and communications as part of an antitrust probe sparked by allegations certain businesses tried to block online farm-supply startup Farmers Business Network Inc (FBN). In a series of court orders dispatched on Tuesday, Canadian Federal Court Justice Denis Gascon said he was satisfied Canada's Competition Bureau was conducting an antitrust probe and that the named companies - which include Bayer AG , Corteva Inc, and BASF - would have or were likely to have information relevant to the inquiry.

    • BASF picks German state of Brandenburg as battery materials production site
      Reuters

      BASF picks German state of Brandenburg as battery materials production site

      Chemicals giant BASF <BASFn.DE> on Wednesday picked a site in the eastern German state of Brandenburg for its second European battery materials factory, part of a 400 million euro investment plan to tap into the growing electric vehicle market. The choice of location gives another boost to the economically weaker former communist east of the country after electric vehicle pioneer Tesla <TSLA.O> in November laid out plans for its first European factory and design center near Berlin. The site, in the town of Schwarzheide, some 120 km (75 miles) south of Berlin, will draw on feedstock from another BASF factory in Harjavalta, Finland, close to a nickel and cobalt refinery of raw materials partner Norilsk Nickel.

    • Chemetall receives the Airbus SQIP award for the 6th consecutive year
      PR Newswire

      Chemetall receives the Airbus SQIP award for the 6th consecutive year

      The Surface Treatment global business unit of BASF's Coatings division, operating under the Chemetall brand, has received the highest supplier award in the Airbus Supply Chain & Quality Improvement Program, known as SQIP. Chemetall once again achieved the "Accredited Supplier" status in the category of Material & Parts.