BAYN.DE - Bayer Aktiengesellschaft

XETRA - XETRA Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
66.50
+1.50 (+2.31%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close65.00
Open64.41
Bid66.57 x 28400
Ask66.60 x 2100
Day's Range64.20 - 66.61
52 Week Range52.02 - 73.17
Volume2,558,538
Avg. Volume3,262,421
Market Cap62.015B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.92
PE Ratio (TTM)110.10
EPS (TTM)0.60
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield2.80 (4.31%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-29
1y Target Est120.99
  • Bayer Braces for ‘Significant Surge’ in Roundup Plaintiffs
    Bloomberg

    Bayer Braces for ‘Significant Surge’ in Roundup Plaintiffs

    (Bloomberg) -- Bayer AG said it anticipates a “significant surge” in the number of plaintiffs suing the company over the weedkiller Roundup when it reports earnings later this month, adding pressure on the company to seek a settlement.An increase in advertising by U.S. attorneys seeking new clients since mediation talks began will likely add to the litigation, the German drugs and chemicals giant said in an emailed statement. The current number of plaintiffs could exceed 45,000, compared with Bayer’s last estimate of 18,400 in July, analysts from JPMorgan Chase & Co. wrote in a note last week.An upswell would ratchet up the stakes for Bayer, which inherited the mountain of litigation last year in the $63 billion takeover of Monsanto. The Roundup crisis has already cost Bayer more than $30 billion in market value as the company lost three U.S. trials over whether the popular herbicide causes cancer, suffered an unprecedented shareholder vote of no confidence and faced speculation about a breakup.“The number of plaintiffs is not an indication of the merits of these cases,” Bayer said. The company says Roundup is safe and has appealed the trial losses.The shares fell as much as 1.2% on Wednesday and were fetching 66.14 euros as of 2:37 p.m. in Frankfurt.The sheer number of lawsuits matters in the ongoing mediation talks. Analysts have estimated that settling all the U.S. lawsuits could cost anywhere from $2.5 billion to $20 billion. Some Bayer investors have said that a global settlement of anything under $10 billion would be worth it. A handful of trials that were scheduled for this fall have been postponed to early 2020 as the sides negotiate a possible resolution.Bayer’s comments came after JPMorgan analysts scrutinized filings in St. Louis County and St. Louis City courts and concluded there could be 26,877 new plaintiffs in those venues alone. The analysis didn’t tally new cases elsewhere, such as in California where it’s lost the three trials.More than 450 new Roundup cases -- many with multiple plaintiffs -- were filed in the St. Louis County courts since July 11, roughly the same number as in the preceding two years, according to a list provided by a court spokeswoman.(Updates with projection of current plaintiffs in second paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Tim Loh in Munich at tloh16@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Eric Pfanner at epfanner1@bloomberg.net, Marthe Fourcade, John LauermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bayer expects significant surge in number of U.S. glyphosate cases
    Reuters

    Bayer expects significant surge in number of U.S. glyphosate cases

    Bayer expects the number of claims in the United States related to Roundup herbicide to have surged in the third quarter, as the German drugs and pesticides maker tries to reach a settlement after earlier court rulings against it. Bayer, which acquired Roundup and other glyphosate-based weed killers as part of its $63 billion takeover of Monsanto last year, faces potentially heavy litigation costs as plaintiffs claim Roundup causes cancer, something Bayer disputes. Bayer's shares have lost about 30% of their value since last August when a California jury in the first such lawsuit found Monsanto should have warned of the alleged cancer risks.

  • Australian farmer brings legal action vs Bayer over weedkiller: report
    Reuters

    Australian farmer brings legal action vs Bayer over weedkiller: report

    An Australian farmer has launched a legal action against Bayer AG's agricultural chemicals unit Monsanto after being diagnosed with a type of cancer he says was caused by its weedkiller, a lawyer for the man said on Friday. New South Wales farmer Ross Wild was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma last year after using the weedkiller Roundup on his farming property near the border of NSW and Victoria since 1976, according to his lawyer Tony Carbone, of Melbourne-based Carbone lawyers.

  • Financial Times

    Bayer sued in Australia over cancer linked to Roundup pesticide

    Lawyers for 67-year-old Ross Wild said on Thursday they had filed a claim in Victoria’s Supreme Court alleging long-term exposure to Roundup’s active ingredient glyphosate had caused him to develop Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The Australian lawsuit threatens to expand Bayer’s legal woes to a country where farmers make extensive use of Roundup and other glyphosate-based weed killers.

  • Moody's

    Scotts Miracle-Gro Company (The) -- Moody's assigns B1 rating to Scotts' proposed senior unsecured notes; outlook is stable

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") today assigned a B1 rating to The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company's ("Scotts") proposed $400 million senior unsecured notes due 2029. The ratings outlook is stable. The rating outlook is stable.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-UPDATE 1-European shares muted as gains in defensives outweigh nerves on trade, Brexit

    European shares were little changed in choppy trade on Monday, after their steepest weekly loss in two months, as bids in defensive shares outweighed nervousness ahead of crucial U.S.-China trade talks and Brexit negotiations. Bayer climbed 1.3% as the company said a pending U.S. lawsuit over claims related to glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has been delayed until further notice. Bayer's shares helped the healthcare index climb 0.6%, while other defensive stocks popular in times of economic strife - food and beverage and utilities - were also leading gains.

  • Morningstar

    Market Too Focused on Corteva's Near Term

    Since seed and crop chemical company Corteva CTVA was spun out of DowDuPont in June, we think the market has focused on near-term uncertainties like the effects of flooded U.S. fields and the dry start to the Brazilian planting season. If plantings pick up in October, the effect could be that sales simply shift from Corteva's third quarter to the fourth, similar to the delayed U.S. plantings in 2018. Regardless, we remain optimistic on Corteva's long-term outlook and view the shares as undervalued.

  • TheStreet.com

    Bayer Shares Gain After Missouri Roundup Trial Postponed Until February 2020

    Bayer shares traded higher in Monday, outpacing the broader German market, after the company said a key trial linked to its Roundup weedkiller had been postponed until February of next year.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-UPDATE 1-Bayer says Oct. U.S. glyphosate trial delayed until further notice

    A pending U.S. lawsuit over claims related to Bayer's glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has been delayed, the company said on Sunday, with a court status conference in February, 2020. "The Oct. 15, 2019 trial date for Winston v. Monsanto in St. Louis City has been postponed," Bayer said in a statement. The lawsuit is the latest of several to be delayed as mediator Ken Feinberg tries to negotiate a settlement between the company and U.S. plaintiffs after a California jury in August last year found that Monsanto should have warned of alleged cancer risks.

  • Bayer says Oct. U.S. glyphosate trial delayed until further notice
    Reuters

    Bayer says Oct. U.S. glyphosate trial delayed until further notice

    A pending U.S. lawsuit over claims related to Bayer's glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup has been delayed, the company said on Sunday, with a court status conference in February, 2020. "The Oct. 15, 2019 trial date for Winston v. Monsanto in St. Louis City has been postponed," Bayer said in a statement. The lawsuit is the latest of several to be delayed as mediator Ken Feinberg tries to negotiate a settlement between the company and U.S. plaintiffs after a California jury in August last year found that Monsanto should have warned of alleged cancer risks.

  • Bayer to spend over 25 billion euros in crop science R&D over 10 years
    Reuters

    Bayer to spend over 25 billion euros in crop science R&D over 10 years

    German drugmaker Bayer on Tuesday said it is to spend more than 25 billion euros ($27.22 billion) on research and development at its agriculture unit over the next 10 years. "Agriculture needs to feed a growing world without starving the planet," Liam Condon, board member and head of the crop science division, said at a company event. Investments in crop science unit last year, on a pro forma basis, amounted to 2.3 billion euros, Bayer said.

  • Nestle Steps Up Testing After Weedkiller Found in Coffee Beans
    Bloomberg

    Nestle Steps Up Testing After Weedkiller Found in Coffee Beans

    (Bloomberg) -- Nestle SA is increasing checks on the coffee it buys, after recent tests showed beans from some countries had levels of the weedkiller glyphosate that are close to a regulatory limit.The world’s largest coffee roaster has informed suppliers of Indonesian and certain Brazilian beans of the new procedures, which go into effect starting Oct. 1, according to memos seen by Bloomberg. The company says the new measures “should be temporary” until producing countries correct the application of glyphosate.The move comes at a time when many countries have either banned or are seeking to prohibit the use of glyphosate, used in the Roundup weedkiller. Bayer AG, which spent $63 billion buying the product’s maker, Monsanto, is now facing billions of dollars worth of lawsuits claiming it causes cancer.Plastic Teabags Release Billions of Tiny Particles, Study Says“We actively monitor chemical residues, including glyphosate, in the green coffee that we purchase,” Switzerland-based Nestle said in a statement. “This monitoring program has shown that in some green coffee lots chemical residue levels are close to limits defined by regulations. We are reinforcing our controls working with suppliers to ensure that our green coffee continues to meet regulations all around the world.”The new measures have the potential to complicate global coffee trade-flows. The additional testing requirement is mostly for beans being shipped to factories in Europe, Australia and Malaysia, where legal limits on glyphosate are stricter than most other countries. The Brazilian memo was directed to suppliers of conilon, as the nation’s more bitter robusta beans are known.Brazilian beans already faced restrictions from buyers who need to meet Europe’s glyphosate limits, said Edimilson Calegari, general manager for Cooabriel, Brazil’s largest robusta-coffee cooperative. “We are working with our members to reduce the use to meet Europe requirements, which is much stricter than most other countries, including the U.S.”Nestle said it’s working with growers to reduce the need for glyphosate. “Our agronomists will continue to work with coffee farmers to help them improve their weed management practices, including the appropriate use of herbicides and adoption of other weeding methods.”To contact the reporters on this story: Isis Almeida in Chicago at ialmeida3@bloomberg.net;Fabiana Batista in Sao Paulo at fbatista6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tina Davis at tinadavis@bloomberg.net, Pratish NarayananFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Startup uses remittances to remove 'time and distance' from health care
    Yahoo Finance

    Startup uses remittances to remove 'time and distance' from health care

    Hoy Health launched less than two years ago, but sees strong growth potential in paving the way to the Latin American health care market.

  • Bayer to reduce size of management board to five
    Reuters

    Bayer to reduce size of management board to five

    Bayer management board members Hartmut Klusik and Kemal Malik will leave at the end of the year without a replacement, as the German drugmaker reduces its board to five seats to cut costs. "By streamlining the structure of the Board of Management, we are optimizing the allocation of responsibilities and contributing to the company's ongoing efficiency program," Werner Wenning, chairman of the non-executive supervisory board, said in a statement on Tuesday. Bayer said last year it would lean more strongly on external firms and institutions for a better drug development pipeline, which most analysts regard as too thin to make up for an expected decline in revenues from its two pharma bestsellers from about 2024.

  • Reuters

    Big Ag wants a cut of booming fake-meat market

    WINNIPEG, Manitoba/CHICAGO Sept 9 (Reuters) - Bunge Ltd, one the world's biggest grain traders, recently disclosed the 1.6% stake it had purchased in the fast-growing fake-meat startup Beyond Meat. The play looked smart after the stock surged more than 250% since the faux burger and sausage maker's initial public offering in May. Indeed, Beyond Meat's market capitalization of $9.9 billion is now larger than Bunge's , a 201-year-old firm with 31,000 employees. No wonder many top agricultural firms want to grab their cut of the booming market for plant-based fake meat.

  • Reuters

    INSIGHT-Inside drugmakers' strategy to boost cancer medicines with "Lazarus effect"

    In the halls of MD Anderson Cancer Center, the drug Vitrakvi is known for having a "Lazarus effect" in some patients because it can reverse late-stage cancer that has defied all other treatment options. Developed by Eli Lilly and Co's Loxo Oncology and marketed by German drugmaker Bayer, it fights a rare genetic mutation that appears in less than 1% of solid tumors, regardless of where they appear in the body. Finding those patients will require widespread adoption of sophisticated tests that look for multiple genetic alterations that could be driving the cancer.

  • Bayer says Monsanto's list of influential people was not illegal
    Reuters

    Bayer says Monsanto's list of influential people was not illegal

    Bayer said a law firm it commissioned to investigate lists compiled by Monsanto of European journalists, politicians and researchers had found no evidence of illegal behaviour. French prosecutors in May opened an inquiry after newspaper Le Monde filed a complaint alleging Monsanto, which was bought by Bayer for $63 billion, had kept files of influential people in a bid to sway public opinion on its pesticides. "There is no question that the ... stakeholder lists created were detailed, methodical, and designed to strongly advocate Monsanto's positions to stakeholders and to the public," Bayer quoted the report by law firm Sidley Austin as saying.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Brazil judge orders Bayer to deposit $69 mln in soy patent dispute

    A Brazilian judge has ordered Germany's Bayer to deposit an additional 286 million reais ($69.4 million) in an escrow account due to a patent dispute with local soybean farmers, according to a court decision seen by Reuters. Federal Judge Vanessa Gasques in the state of Mato Grosso issued the ruling late on Tuesday, ordering the company to make the deposit within 48 hours. Bayer previously deposited 11.9 million reais related to the case, corresponding to 4% of the royalties in question from the genetically modified Intacta soybean seed.