CDI.PA - Christian Dior SE

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
378.00
-8.40 (-2.17%)
At close: 5:38PM CEST
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close386.40
Open382.60
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range373.00 - 383.80
52 Week Range252.40 - 498.20
Volume11,099
Avg. Volume19,371
Market Cap68.195B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.88
PE Ratio (TTM)23.23
EPS (TTM)16.27
Earnings DateJul 22, 2020 - Jul 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield4.80 (1.24%)
Ex-Dividend DateJul 07, 2020
1y Target Est396.00
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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    • Luxury Trendspotting Isn't Easy in the Covid-19 Age
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      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Almost three weeks ago, the American retailer J. Crew Group Inc. filed for bankruptcy after it fell out of fashion. But there’s one item from the once-feted store that shoppers just can’t get enough of: masks. The most recent batch of nonmedical face coverings in its signature fabrics — plain blue shirting and blue-and-white stripes — has sold out on its British website.Upmarket, stylish face coverings could provide a bit of a boost in a coronavirus-strewn landscape, where luxury goods sales are expected to drop as much as 35% this year, according to Bain & Co. estimates. To give some idea of the pent-up demand, fashion search platform Lyst said searches for masks are up 1,600% over the past month, compared with a year earlier.   That’s sparked a huge debate in the luxury industry as to whether to cash in. After all, if we’re going to have to wear masks anyway, why not make them chic?It may be tempting. At the height of the crisis, many fashion houses — including LVMH’s Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior; Kering SA’s Gucci; Prada SpA; Burberry Group Plc; and Ralph Lauren Inc. — repurposed some production facilities to make personal protective equipment for donation to medical workers on the front lines. Burberry is poised to take delivery of a special mask-making machine at its mill in Keighley, Yorkshire. But the items will be for donation, not for sale in its shops. And they certainly won’t be made out of its iconic red, white, black and tan check.While the brands have gained the requisite skills, there are considerable risks associated with turning masks into fashion statements. So far, the bling behemoths are wisely keeping a respectable social distance.If luxury goods companies were to make masks for profit, not only would they need to look stylish, but they would probably have to boast some health effectiveness, too. And they’d have to be expensive to fit with any luxury brand’s high-end prices. For example, a Louis Vuitton monogrammed mink-fur sleep mask — perfect for catching some shuteye on that first-class flight — costs 700 pounds ($859).The danger is that luxury groups would be seen as profiteering from a health-care emergency. What’s more, according to consultants at McKinsey & Co., consumers shift to more subtle “silent luxury,” rather than in-your-face bling, after a large-scale crisis with a heavy emotional toll. What is perceived as unethical behavior — or simply ugly consumerism — could turn off customers, especially younger shoppers who are particularly conscious of brands’ social values.One way to get around this would be to give a percentage of the profits to good causes, or to donate one mask for every one sold. J. Crew has donated 75,000 single-use masks to Montefiore Health System hospitals in New York.Even if the pitfalls around profiteering are surmounted, there are other perils. Luxury is about feeling good. Brands must weigh whether they want to be associated with a pandemic and its huge human and economic toll. And although masks can have replaceable filters that extend their use, it’s unlikely people will hold onto them for long. Being disposable is anathema to luxury goods, from Hermes handbags to Cartier watches, for which heritage is crucial.That doesn’t mean face coverings won’t work for some brands. For example, Off-White, the streetwear label from DJ and designer Virgil Abloh, who is also the artistic director for Louis Vuitton’s menswear, has been producing masks for some time. Off-White’s $95 arrow-logo face mask was the most in-demand men’s fashion item in the first quarter, according to the Lyst index, which measures clothing and accessories searches on its own site, Google and other social media.Streetwear masks, along with heavy boots and multi-pocket coats, are part of an apocalyptic look that began to emerge before Covid-19. Serving to partly conceal one’s identity and repel other urban hazards like pollution, masks are a good fit with younger, edgier brands, such as the aptly named Anti Social Social Club. That’s not the case for traditional luxury.Consequently, the big fashion houses would be better off focusing their attention on items that can be accessorized with masks, or adapting products to changing needs. Luxury resale site Vestiaire Collective saw a 45% increase in orders for scarves, including Hermes’s classic silks, in the last week of March, compared with the previous seven days, and demand has remained elevated. Brands could experiment with supersized sun visors to ensure social distancing or extended collars that could double as face coverings.As the world emerges from the pandemic, and things become less emotionally charged, consumers may give luxury brands more permission to sell them protective clothing. For now, any move to do so will likely be a one-off to grab attention on the catwalk or Instagram. The pop star Billie Eilish, for one, donned a Gucci custom double-G-emblazoned mask for the Grammy Awards in January. While Gucci’s decision not to commercialize the product means passing up millions of euros of sales, it’s the right call.  This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • Did Christian Dior SE's (EPA:CDI) Recent Earnings Growth Beat The Trend?
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    • For Luxury Brands, It’s Too Early to Pop Open the Champagne
      Bloomberg

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      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A flagship Hermes International store in Guangzhou reportedly took in $2.7 million on its first day reopening after the coronavirus lockdown, the biggest daily haul for a boutique in China, according to fashion trade bible WWD.The French luxury brand best known for its Kelly and Birkin bags may not be alone in enjoying the phenomenon that has been referred to as “revenge spending.” The term, coined to describe pent-up consumer demand in the 1980s after the poverty and chaos of the Cultural Revolution, is now being applied to splurging by Chinese shoppers as the virus recedes.LVMH, hit by a 17% decline in first-quarter sales excluding currency movements and acquisitions, said late Thursday that Chinese consumers were once again enthusiastically embracing its brands, including Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior. And my Bloomberg News colleagues reported that sales at LVMH stores on the mainland were up 50% year-on-year in the past three weeks.Cosmetics maker L’Oreal SA also pointed to a recovery in the region’s demand for beauty products. Of course, that may be a function of what’s called the “lipstick” index, where when times are tough consumers tend to buy smaller treats rather than more expensive items. But the signs do bode well for demand from Chinese consumers, who could account for 44% of luxury spending this year, according to analysts at Jefferies.Still, none of this may be enough to rescue second-quarter trading, nor the full year.First of all, there’s no guarantee that the rebound will be sustained. What’s more, during normal times the Chinese make the majority of their vanity purchases when they travel abroad. In this new post-coronavirus era, there has been an initial trend toward more domestic spending, and that could accelerate further. But bigger impulse purchases are still more likely to happen when people can finally visit cities such as Paris or Milan. With airplanes still grounded in many places and borders closed, travel is set to be severely constrained for some time, and that will be a drag on industry growth.Meanwhile, stores in Europe and the U.S. remain closed. When they finally reopen, brands will find it very difficult to compensate for fewer Chinese visitors. Massive job losses and all of the other economic hardships brought by lockdowns means they won’t be able to count on local shoppers to make up the difference. Consultants Bain & Co. estimate that global personal luxury goods sales could fall as much as 35% this year, with a mid-point scenario at 22-25%. This would be the worst decline in modern luxury industry history.Despite the inevitable industry downturn this year — one that will possibly stretch into 2021 — LVMH looks to be one of the best-placed luxury groups.With revenue of 52 billion euros ($56 billion) in 2019, more than three times that of its nearest rivals, LVMH has significant scale and a strong stable of brands, led by Louis Vuitton and Dior but also including Fendi and Celine in fashion and the Sephora beauty stores. The 10% decline in fashion and leather goods sales, excluding currency movements and acquisitions, is better than might have been expected. The company run by billionaire Bernard Arnault also has a diverse portfolio, both geographically and in terms of products, which include spirits and beauty lines too. This gives it scope to cut costs, but also, crucially, to invest when competitors may be weakened.There are some worries. For example, the $16 billion acquisition of American diamond-jewelry icon Tiffany & Co. will now be more of a challenge. (LVMH indicated on Thursday that it would still go ahead with the deal.) And it also has exposure to travel retail through major duty-free chain DFS, which may be depressed for some time.So LVMH won’t be immune from the continued disruption to luxury goods sales. But as it demonstrated in the first quarter it should be more than able to hold its own.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Christian Dior shows good resilience in the first quarter of 2020

      The Christian Dior group recorded revenue of 10.6 billion Euros for the first quarter of 2020, down 15% compared to the same period in 2019 and down 17% on an organic* basis. The Group has proven its ability to be resilient in an economic environment disrupted by a serious health crisis that has led to the closure of stores and manufacturing sites in most countries in recent weeks, as well as the suspension of international travel. Christian Dior's priority is to ensure the safety of its employees and customers.

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    • Investors Who Bought Christian Dior (EPA:CDI) Shares Five Years Ago Are Now Up 73%
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      Christian Dior: Annual shareholders' meeting 2020

      Paris, March 25th, 2020 ANNUAL SHAREHOLDERS’MEETING 2020 Given the current situation, the Christian Dior Board, which met today, has decided to postpone the Annual.

    • What Is Christian Dior's (EPA:CDI) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Tanked?
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    • The King of Luxury Is Armed for Uncertain Times
      Bloomberg

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      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When even LVMH misses estimates, it’s not a good look for the luxury sector.While the owner of the Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior brands still delivered 8% growth in organic sales in the final quarter of the year, this was slightly below the consensus of analysts’ estimates of 8.7%. Organic sales from the fashion and leather goods division — its driver, accounting for 41% of sales and 64% of operating profit in 2019 — rose by 15%. That’s impressive, but still slower than the second and third quarters.The world’s biggest luxury group hasn’t been immune from the unrest in Hong Kong and a slowdown in Japan after the country increased its consumption tax in October. The backdrop could get worse, given the spread of the deadly coronavirus, which has claimed more than 130 lives.LVMH’s chairman and founder, Bernard Arnault, said on Tuesday that if the outbreak was contained quickly — say in two to two-and-a-half months — the effect would be manageable. If it lasted longer, it would be more serious, he added. Given that Chinese consumers accounted for about 35% of luxury purchases last year, according to Bain & Co. and Altagamma, all top end groups are exposed to the spread of the deadly virus. It’s clearly too early to say how things will progress, and with China grappling with how best to stop the spread of a novel virus that’s infected thousands of people, now isn’t the time to worry about handbag sales. But the uncertain outlook speaks to just how dependent many of the world’s global consumer brands are on China’s market and Chinese consumers wherever they are.For example, on Tuesday Starbucks Corp. said that it would have upgraded its financial projections for the year had it not been for the outbreak in mainland China, its most important growth market. While its high-end Roastery in Shanghai may look like a luxury temple, with queues to rival those at Louis Vuitton, it is just one of its 4,000 outlets across the country. The group has closed more than 2,000 cafes in response to the spread of the illness.As for LVMH, while it will be hit just like the other big brands, it may be better placed to weather any impact than most of its rivals. Its exposure to Chinese consumers is around the industry average — about 30% — according to analysts at UBS. Thanks to both its  geographic and product diversification, with sizable operations in the U.S., for example, it is less dependent on Chinese shoppers than many of its rivals.With sales about three times that of its nearest competitor, it also has scope to change its focus, for example by investing in marketing campaigns to attract domestic customers in the Europe and the U.S., where it’s just bought diamond jewelry specialist Tiffany & Co. It also has scope to cut costs in Asia, if the situation deteriorates further. Consequently, LVMH would face a potential 3% fall in this year’s earnings from a 20% drop in Chinese consumption in the second quarter, according to UBS, which expects some other luxury groups would be hit harder. LVMH hasn’t been immune from the sell-off in luxury shares over the past 10 days. It’s down about 6% since Jan. 17. Even with the recent dip, the shares are up about 60% over the past year, and remain at a deserved premium to the Bloomberg Intelligence top luxury peer group.It’s still early days in terms of establishing the toll the deadly virus might take on luxury and consumer groups. But LVMH’s scale and financial strength should make it one of the more resilient.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Christian Dior: Record Results in 2019

      Record Results in 2019                 Paris, 28 January 2020 The Christian Dior group recorded revenue of €53.7 billion in 2019, up 15%. Organic revenue growth was.

    • Should You Worry About Christian Dior SE's (EPA:CDI) CEO Pay?
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    • A Tennis-Ball-Sized Diamond Is the Ultimate Status Symbol
      Bloomberg

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      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- If you have to ask the price, you can’t afford it. No wonder Bernard Arnault, France’s richest man, isn’t disclosing the details of LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE’s deal to carve up the second-biggest diamond ever recorded in the history books.On Thursday, Lucara Diamond Corp. said it had entered into a collaboration with LVMH that will see the 1,758-carat Sewelo diamond, which is roughly the size of a tennis ball, turned into Louis Vuitton jewelry. The stone’s name means “rare find.” LVMH is probably one of the few luxury groups that could pull off such a coup.But this is no vanity project. It comes hard on the heels of LVMH’s close to $16 billion purchase of Tiffany & Co., the go-to destination for engagement rings wrapped in that iconic little blue box. If that indicated the French company’s intent in jewelry, this leaves no doubt.It’s not yet clear how exactly the rough diamond will be used. Louis Vuitton has been expanding in fine jewelry, and with its Maison Vendome flagship store has a dedicated space for the category with its own entrance on the Place Vendome, the epicenter of Paris jewelry retailing. The group’s other jewelry houses include Bulgari, Fred, Chaumet, and the soon-to-be-added Tiffany. Christian Dior, meanwhile, has the potential to sell lots of pricey adornments to its fashionista fans.However it eventually polishes up, the Sewelo will be part of the classic luxury playbook.  LVMH will likely create several extremely high-end pieces  to establish a sense of exclusivity. While only a small number of customers may be wealthy enough to purchase these, many more will be able  snap up Tiffany bangles or Louis Vuitton rings. LVMH is counting on the stone to encourage these purchases, too. It’s the diamond-encrusted equivalent of sending extravagant creations down the catwalk to sell trunk loads of Louis Vuitton’s popular Neverfull bags, which sell for about 1,000 pounds ($1,307).Even taking this strategy into account, it’s likely that LVMH will seek to take Tiffany upmarket. There’s scope to increase its margins by jettisoning lower-price products and selling more high-end pieces. The allure of the Sewelo will help in this process, too.The luxury jewelry market is growing strongly, with particular demand for items boasting a designer label. Bain & Co. estimates that excluding currency fluctuations, sales rose 9% in 2019, in contrast to watches, where sales fell 2%. Timepieces have been hurt not only by the unrest in Hong Kong but by the segment’s continued disruption by smart and connected watches. Jewelry faces no such technological shifts. So there’s plenty of room for LVMH to expand.A more muscular rival is a worry for companies including Richemont, which owns Van Cleef & Arpels and Cartier, as well as Swatch Group AG, which owns Harry Winston. It could also make it harder for LVMH’s French archrival Kering SA, which also has scope to sell more jewels, to do so. Luca Solca, analyst at Bernstein, has suggested that a merger between Richemont and Kering would be a formidable response.LVMH’s Sewelo gem gambit is not without some potential pitfalls. At the moment it is a rough stone, whose outer surface is still covered in a layer of carbon. It’s not yet clear what kind or quality of polished gem it will reveal. Lucara Diamond previously said it may not deliver the highest standard.Whatever emerges, the stone’s size alone will make for an interesting story for LVMH’s marketing team. And with the group being at the cutting edge of fashion, it may be bolder and more creative than a diamond dealer, whose primary concern is usually how many carats can be secured in order to maximize the sale price. Add in the halo effect around the jewelry maisons — the Sewelo will be shown to clients and press at the Paris couture shows next week before embarking on a world tour —  and there’s even less of a risk.So even if the Sewelo doesn’t turn out to be as much of a sparkler as hoped, it will still help LVMH sell plenty of other baubles.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • Here's Why We Think Christian Dior (EPA:CDI) Is Well Worth Watching
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    • Reuters

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      Louis Vuitton owner LVMH has agreed to buy U.S. jeweller Tiffany for $16.2 billion in the luxury goods maker's biggest acquisition to date. The $135-per share cash deal will boost LVMH's smallest business, the jewellery and watch division that is already home to Bulgari and Tag Heuer, and help it expand in one of the fastest-growing sections of the industry. Fashion and accessories brands including Christian Dior generate the bulk of earnings at LVMH, run by France's richest man, Bernard Arnault, though growth in jewellery has shone in recent years.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Christian Dior: Financial release Interim Dividend

      Paris, November 13, 2019 FINANCIAL RELEASE INTERIM DIVIDEND At a meeting held today, the Board of Directors of Christian Dior approved, in the context of the transactions.

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    • GlobeNewswire

      Christian Dior: 16% revenue growth in the first nine months of 2019

      16% revenue growth                                              in the first nine months of 2019 Paris, October 9, 2019 The Christian Dior group recorded a 16% increase in.

    • Investors Who Bought Christian Dior (EPA:CDI) Shares Five Years Ago Are Now Up 230%
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    • Reuters

      Dior's transient garden sets the mood for Paris Fashion Week

      Christian Dior presented a wardrobe fit for glamorous eco-warriors in Paris on Tuesday, as models showed off looks dotted in wild flowers on a catwalk lined with trees set to be replanted around the city. Dior, part of luxury group LVMH, is one of the first major French brands to kick off Paris Fashion Week, with the likes of Kering's Saint Laurent and independent Chanel also set to showcase looks for next spring and summer. Hot on the heels of runway shows in New York, London and Milan, where some labels as well as organisers sought to address consumer concerns over the industry's green credentials, Paris is also looking to improve its environmental record.