CM - Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
82.56
+0.20 (+0.24%)
At close: 4:03PM EST

82.56 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:18PM EST

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Previous Close82.36
Open82.25
Bid82.56 x 900
Ask82.57 x 800
Day's Range82.17 - 82.60
52 Week Range72.96 - 87.62
Volume363,747
Avg. Volume541,764
Market Cap37B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.14
PE Ratio (TTM)9.43
EPS (TTM)8.76
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield4.37 (5.30%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-26
1y Target Est98.31
  • Oil Falls As U.S. Gasoline Supplies Rise by Most Since January
    Bloomberg

    Oil Falls As U.S. Gasoline Supplies Rise by Most Since January

    (Bloomberg) -- Oil fell to the lowest level in nearly a week as U.S. crude and fuel inventories increased.Futures in New York declined 0.8% Wednesday. American gasoline supplies jumped the most since January last week as demand hit a three-year low, according to the the Energy Information Administration. Crude stockpiles rose by 822,000 barrels.“The build in products was really fast, and it was a pretty big build,” said Bill O’Grady, chief market strategist at Confluence Investment Management LLC in St. Louis. “This is the holiday season, so you do get some driving. This build means the economy is not as strong as it looks.”The gasoline build topped estimates by the industry-funded American Petroleum Institute, with every part of the country seeing an inventory boost. The fifth weekly gain in supply has now pushed fuel inventories to seasonally the highest in five years. The EIA also reported a 5.4 million-barrel increase in Gulf Coast crude supplies, a signal that refiners there are consuming less than usual.West Texas Intermediate for January delivery settled 48 cents lower to $58.76 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract ended Tuesday at $59.24, the highest settlement since Sept. 17.Brent for February settlement fell 62 cents to close at $63.72 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange. The global benchmark crude traded at a $5.07 premium to WTI for the same month.Crude had been hovering around the highest levels since mid-September after the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies surprised the market on Friday by announcing deeper-than-forecast production cuts for next year. A report from the group on Wednesday showed that it will have to implement the agreed curbs in full -- including compliance from laggards like Iraq and Nigeria -- to balance markets in early 2020.“After a big run on the OPEC news last week, which was positive, I am not quite surprised to see lower prices on the back of EIA data,” said Rebecca Babin, senior equity trader at CIBC Private Wealth Management. “The market is in consolidation after the OPEC-led rally.“To contact the reporter on this story: Sheela Tobben in New York at vtobben@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Marino at dmarino4@bloomberg.net, Catherine Traywick, Mike JeffersFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • CIBC adds 200 specialized advisors, new technology to support Canadian entrepreneurs
    CNW Group

    CIBC adds 200 specialized advisors, new technology to support Canadian entrepreneurs

    CIBC adds 200 specialized advisors, new technology to support Canadian entrepreneurs

  • Branches Still Pay Off for Canada’s Banks Even in the App Era
    Bloomberg

    Branches Still Pay Off for Canada’s Banks Even in the App Era

    (Bloomberg) -- In a world reliant on smartphone apps, bank branches may no longer be Main Street mainstays, with red velvet ropes between brass stanchions herding customers to tellers behind wickets.But they’re still an important part of banking and, in Canada, the two largest lenders are beating their smaller rivals at drawing more and more revenue from physical locations. Royal Bank of Canada and Toronto-Dominion Bank earn C$14 million ($10.6 million) a year from each of their domestic branches, distancing themselves from smaller competitors in the process.Bank branches are evolving as customers increasingly rely on mobile phones, websites and automated teller machines for routine transactions, with the drudgery of standing in line to cash a paycheck or shift money between accounts largely left to a bygone era.Canada’s banks have reacted accordingly, shrinking branch sizes, adopting the newest technology and turning once counter-bound tellers into roaming advisers armed with tablets to sell high-margin products and mortgages. That’s paying off: All of the big Canadian banks have posted increases in annual revenue per branch in each of the past three years, and sales have soared substantially from a decade ago.“We’re growing our investment in innovative formats: university campuses, hospitals, newcomer centers, which is helping us grow our client base,” Royal Bank Chief Financial Officer Rod Bolger said in a phone interview. “As we have ramped up our leading digital and mobile applications, customers and clients still like to come to branches for advice.”Royal Bank is Canada’s leader, with 1,201 branches across the country -- four more than a decade ago, even with the addition of digital-banking options during that period. Annual revenue per branch has soared 70% since 2009. Technology has allowed branch employees to focus on dispensing advice to customers rather than merely handling routine transactions, according to Bolger.“We continue to free up time for our banking advisers,” he said. “That is helping us to continue to expand our market share, which will then in turn result in higher productivity per branch.”Rival Toronto-Dominion, meanwhile, has 1,091 branches nationwide, slightly fewer than a decade ago. Like Royal Bank, it has seen a surge in per-branch revenue, with a 66% increase since 2009. The ratio for each of bank was calculated by dividing annual revenue from Canadian personal-and-commercial banking by the number of domestic branches at the end of each fiscal year.“People have been speculating about the future of branches, but we’ve been very clear in our strategy that branches are important to us -- they’re an important contact point for customers who need human advice and human touch,” Toronto-Dominion CFO Riaz Ahmed said. “We continue to see them as a very important part of our strategy.”Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce brings in an average of C$10 million in yearly sales, up about 53% from a decade ago, for each of its 1,024 branches.Customer Conversations“We continue to improve our advisory capabilities and focus on having conversations with clients to understand their needs and to provide them with products and services that they need,” said CIBC CFO Hratch Panossian. “That has had some positive momentum.”Canada’s six largest banks operate 5,578 branches domestically, 2.9% fewer than a decade ago. While the decline isn’t as dramatic as was once predicted by those who thought ATMs and mobile banking would spell an end to bricks-and-mortar locations, branches also aren’t keeping pace with population growth.Canada had 20 branches for every 100,000 adults as of 2018, down from about 25 before the 2008 financial crisis, according to the World Bank. The U.S., in comparison, had about 31 branches per 100,000 adults, down from 35.Bank of Nova Scotia reduced its domestic network the most, trimming 6.9% of its branches from a decade ago, to 949 today. Those branches generate an average of C$11 million in annual revenue, an amount that has climbed steadily in the past six years.“Scotiabank has been adding adviser roles to branches,” spokesman Clancy Zeifman said in an email. “We have also been investing in technologies and tools to help our employees be more productive, including removing manual processes so they can spend more time focusing on our customers.”While branches remain important for Bank of Montreal, CFO Tom Flynn said he expects a gradual decline in both the number of branches and average size amid a push toward digital banking. Canada’s fourth-largest lender has 891 domestic locations, which generate about C$9 million in annual sales on average, a 55% jump from 2009.Smaller Branches“We want to be close to people when they’re doing transactions that are bigger and really important to them,” Flynn said. “At the same time, total branch traffic is down, given the digital migration, and in response to that we have been and will continue to take the average square footage of our branch network down.”National Bank of Canada has the lowest annual revenue per branch, at C$8.2 million for each of its 422 locations, though that’s still 60% higher than a decade ago. The Montreal-based lender, the smallest among Canada’s Big Six banks, may lag behind its larger rivals partly because of its regional focus.“We are located in the province of Quebec, where people are less in debt -- they borrow less,” Jean Dagenais, senior vice president of finance, said in an interview. With property values lower than in other parts of Canada and mortgages smaller as a result, “the volume of loans per branch is lower than a big bank in the Toronto area.”To contact the reporter on this story: Doug Alexander in Toronto at dalexander3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Scanlan at dscanlan@bloomberg.net, ;Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Daniel Taub, Steve DicksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • PR Newswire

    CIBC's Agility Savings Account Named a Best of 2020 by GOBankingRates.com

    CIBC Agility Savings, the online-only high interest savings account offered by CIBC Bank USA, was named a Best Savings Account of 2020 by GOBankingRates.com.

  • Are You Looking for a High-Growth Dividend Stock? Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) Could Be a Great Choice
    Zacks

    Are You Looking for a High-Growth Dividend Stock? Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) Could Be a Great Choice

    Dividends are one of the best benefits to being a shareholder, but finding a great dividend stock is no easy task. Does Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) have what it takes? Let's find out.

  • Improve Your Retirement Income with These 3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks - December 06, 2019
    Zacks

    Improve Your Retirement Income with These 3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks - December 06, 2019

    The traditional approaches to retirement planning are longer covering all expenses in nest egg years. So what can retirees do? Thankfully, there are alternative investments that provide steady, higher-rate income streams to replace dwindling bond yields.

  • CNW Group

    CIBC Asset Management announces estimated 2019 annual reinvested capital gains distributions for CIBC ETFs

    CIBC Asset Management announces estimated 2019 annual reinvested capital gains distributions for CIBC ETFs

  • Canadian Imperial (CM) Down on Lower Q4 Earnings, Costs Rise
    Zacks

    Canadian Imperial (CM) Down on Lower Q4 Earnings, Costs Rise

    Substantial increase in credit costs hurts Canadian Imperial's (CM) fiscal Q4 earnings.

  • Reuters

    CANADA STOCKS-TSX slide continues as bank earnings disappoint

    Canada's main stock index extended its slide from earlier this week on Thursday, as weak earnings reports from lenders Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and TD Bank Group added to a gloomy mood among investors, worried about global trade disputes. The Toronto Stock Exchange's S&P/TSX composite index was down 75.58 points, or 0.45%, at 16,821.76, on track for its biggest weekly loss in two months. * Financials were the biggest decliners on the main index as shares in TD Bank dropped 3% and CIBC slid 5% after posting smaller-than-expected quarterly earnings.

  • Canadian banks expect subdued 2020 after dismal quarter wipes $15 billion of value
    Reuters

    Canadian banks expect subdued 2020 after dismal quarter wipes $15 billion of value

    Toronto Dominion Bank, Canada's largest bank by assets, and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce were the last of the top six lenders to report on Thursday. Canadian banks are facing rising loan loss provisions and limited appetite for dealmaking as economic uncertainties mount. Oil price declines and decade-high consumer insolvencies in Canada are also creating headwinds.

  • TD, CIBC Earnings Misses Cap Hard Quarter for Canadian Banks
    Bloomberg

    TD, CIBC Earnings Misses Cap Hard Quarter for Canadian Banks

    (Bloomberg) -- Earnings disappointments at Toronto-Dominion Bank and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce capped a tough quarter for Canada’s six largest lenders, with the industry sideswiped by rising provisions for soured loans and slumping capital markets.Both Toronto-Dominion and CIBC reported fiscal fourth quarter results that missed analysts’ estimates Thursday, after setting aside more money for loan losses and posting declining profits in capital markets and Canadian banking. Toronto-Dominion also was affected by a C$154 million ($117 million) restructuring charge, with the majority covering severance packages, echoing measures taken by Bank of Montreal earlier in the week that marked the industry’s biggest job cuts in years.“We took some restructuring charges as we continue to accelerate our ongoing efforts to modernize our operations and improve our efficiency,” Toronto-Dominion Chief Financial Officer Riaz Ahmed said Thursday in a phone interview, declining to give a number for the job reductions. “Because it’s broadly distributed, it’s just a very small portion of our workforce.”The two banks join Royal Bank of Canada in posting quarterly results that failed to live up to analysts’ expectations. Bank of Montreal beat estimates earlier in the week, even after taking a restructuring charge for job cuts that will affect about 5% of its workforce, or about 2,300 employees, while Montreal-based National Bank of Canada also topped expectations. Bank of Nova Scotia matched estimates when it reported its results last week.Toronto-Dominion’s shares fell 3% to C$73.40 at 9:49 a.m. in Toronto, while CIBC slumped 4.8% to C$109.33, its biggest intraday decline in more than four years.Earnings at Toronto-Dominion fell 3.5% to C$2.86 billion, with adjusted earnings of C$1.59 a share missing the C$1.73 average estimate of analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. Earnings from Canadian retail, which includes wealth management, were little changed, though profit in Canadian personal and commercial banking fell. The lender’s capital markets business also saw an earnings drop, due in part to changes to its trading capabilities that caused some derivative valuation charges in the quarter.‘Largest Miss’“All segments came in below our forecast with the largest miss in Canadian retail banking,” RBC Capital Markets analyst Darko Mihelic said in a note to clients.CIBC’s profit fell 5.9% to C$1.19 billion after taking a C$135 million goodwill charge related to selling a stake in CIBC FirstCaribbean in November, and adjusted per-share earnings of C$2.84 missed the C$3.07 average analysts’ estimate. A 37% jump in earnings from its U.S. commercial banking and wealth management was a bright spot in a quarter that saw profit declines in its Canadian businesses and capital markets.Rising provisions were a theme across Canadian banks in the fourth quarter. Toronto-Dominion set aside C$891 million in the quarter for soured loans, up 33% from a year ago and its highest amount in at least two years, in what Ahmed described as the “effects of normalizing” provisions.“We are continuing to see a normalization from what has been cyclically very low provisions in the last two years,” he said. “We just see it as individual business stories and not an overall trend in the economy.”CIBC’s provisions soared 52% to C$402 million, with part of that due to a C$52 million fraud-related impairment in its Canadian commercial bank.“We had a few unusual items this year combined with continued normalization in an environment that the industry has seen,” CIBC CFO Hratch Panossian said in a phone interview. “On the impaired, we had a few unique events. Those we feel go away.”(Updates with additional banks in first paragraph, shares in fifth.)To contact the reporter on this story: Doug Alexander in Toronto at dalexander3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, ;David Scanlan at dscanlan@bloomberg.net, Daniel Taub, Steve DicksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    WRAPUP 1-TD Bank, CIBC close out poor year for Canada bank earnings with profit misses

    TD Bank Group and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce posted smaller-than-expected quarterly earnings on Thursday, closing out the worst year since the financial crisis. Three of the four Canadian banks that reported earnings prior to Thursday saw share sell-offs, as sliding investment banking fees, pressure on margins and an increasingly weak credit environment led to disappointing results. While net interest margins in Canada have largely remained stable as the Bank of Canada has left interest rates unchanged since September 2018, consumer insolvencies, which have climbed to the highest since 2010, have forced lenders to increase their loan loss provisions.

  • Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) Lags Q4 Earnings Estimates
    Zacks

    Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) Lags Q4 Earnings Estimates

    Canadian Imperial Bank (CM) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -7.33% and 0.86%, respectively, for the quarter ended October 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Bloomberg

    CIBC Misses Estimates Even With U.S.-Focused Strategy Paying Off

    (Bloomberg) -- Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce’s strategy of being a little less Canadian is catching on, though that did little to help earnings last quarter.CIBC’s $5 billion takeover of Chicago-based PrivateBancorp two years ago was the cornerstone of Chief Executive Officer Victor Dodig’s push to diversify beyond Canada. That plan is working, with profit from U.S. commercial banking and wealth management at a record C$180 million ($137 million) as growth continues to outpace CIBC’s banking businesses in Canada. Earnings missed analysts’ estimates.Key InsightsCIBC has a goal of getting 17% of its earnings from U.S. businesses by 2020, with contributions from capital markets and the PrivateBancorp acquisition, the bank’s largest takeover in its 152-year history. CIBC reached that target, with a 37% increase from U.S. commercial banking and wealth management in the quarter.Dodig warned investors in May that earnings this year would be “relatively flat” after posting quarterly results hampered by a contraction in domestic mortgages and net interest income. CIBC’s per-share earnings fell 7.9% in the fourth quarter, leaving earnings down 3.9% for the year.CIBC has being seeing an increase in provisions for credit losses throughout the year as changes in accounting rules took effect. It set aside C$402 million for soured loans in the fiscal fourth quarter, up 52% from a year earlier.The CEO told investors in September that the bank “put the brakes on too hard” in cooling its once industry-leading domestic mortgage growth and said the bank is “readjusting.” CIBC’s domestic mortgage book was unchanged from a year earlier at C$202 billion in balances.Canadian personal and small business banking is CIBC’s biggest and most important division, given its reliance on the domestic operation for almost half of overall earnings. That division earned C$601 million in the quarter, down 10%, compared with the 3% decrease for CIBC Capital Markets and the 8.1% decline for Canadian commercial banking and wealth management.Market ReactionCIBC shares have risen 13% this year through Wednesday, compared with a 12% gain for the eight-company S&P/TSX Commercial Banks Index.Get MoreFourth-quarter net income fell 5.9% to C$1.19 billion, or C$2.58 a share, after recording a C$135 million goodwill charge from selling a 66.7% stake in CIBC FirstCaribbean in November. Adjusted per-share earnings totaled C$2.84, missing the C$3.07 average estimate of 14 analysts in a Bloomberg survey.Read more about CIBC’s quarterly results here.To contact the reporter on this story: Doug Alexander in Toronto at dalexander3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Scanlan at dscanlan@bloomberg.net, ;Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, Daniel Taub, Steve DicksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Charles Brindamour appointed to CIBC's Board of Directors
    CNW Group

    Charles Brindamour appointed to CIBC's Board of Directors

    Charles Brindamour appointed to CIBC's Board of Directors

  • CIBC declares dividends for the Quarter Ending January 31, 2020
    CNW Group

    CIBC declares dividends for the Quarter Ending January 31, 2020

    CIBC declares dividends for the Quarter Ending January 31, 2020

  • CIBC Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2019 Results
    CNW Group

    CIBC Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2019 Results

    CIBC Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2019 Results

  • Giant Thank You Card Unveiled at Toronto Headquarters to Celebrate 35th Anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day
    CNW Group

    Giant Thank You Card Unveiled at Toronto Headquarters to Celebrate 35th Anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day

    Giant Thank You Card Unveiled at Toronto Headquarters to Celebrate 35th Anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day

  • CIBC promotes Spurgin to head technology lending unit
    American City Business Journals

    CIBC promotes Spurgin to head technology lending unit

    CIBC has named Alan Spurgin to head its U.S. Innovation Banking unit, which provides strategic advice and funding to technology businesses and startups.

  • Bank of Canada Holds Steady, Citing ‘Intact’ Global Recovery
    Bloomberg

    Bank of Canada Holds Steady, Citing ‘Intact’ Global Recovery

    (Bloomberg) -- The Bank of Canada struck an upbeat tone Wednesday, citing evidence of a stabilizing global economy and a resilient domestic backdrop that gives little indication policy makers are in a rush to lower borrowing costs.The Ottawa-based central bank held its benchmark interest rate at 1.75% for a ninth consecutive meeting, retaining language from its previous statement that it judges the current level to be “appropriate.” The prolonged pause has left Canada with the highest policy rate among advanced economies.The decision showcases a Bank of Canada still comfortable with its wait-and-see stance, maintaining its outlier status in a period of global monetary easing. In the statement, officials said the October projection for a recovery in global growth “appears to be intact,” even as international trade disputes remain the biggest source of risk. It characterized domestic economic conditions, driven by consumers and housing, as resilient.“Future interest rate decisions will be guided by the Bank’s continuing assessment of the adverse impact of trade conflicts against the sources of resilience in the Canadian economy,” policy makers led by Governor Stephen Poloz said in the statement.“There is nascent evidence that the global economy is stabilizing,” officials said, adding they expect global growth to edge higher over the next couple of years.The Canadian dollar extended gains on the decision, up 0.6% to C$1.3219 per U.S. dollar at 10:20 a.m. Toronto time, as investors pared bets on future cuts. Yields on two-year Canadian government bonds also jumped, trading at 1.62%, from 1.56% on Tuesday.“It’s steady as she goes for Captain Poloz,” Benjamin Reitzes, an economist at Bank of Montreal, said in a note to investors. “Today’s statement can be characterized as glass half full.”All 27 economists surveyed by Bloomberg expected the Bank of Canada to hold on Wednesday, though many see the bank eventually cutting borrowing costs as early as the first quarter next year. Markets are still pricing in a two-thirds chance of a rate cut over the next 12 months.Analysts characterized the statement as less dovish than the previous statement in October, when the central bank highlighted global risks and Poloz acknowledged the central bank had considered the merits of an insurance cut. While there was no reference to that in Wednesday’s statement, Deputy Governor Tim Lane will provide more insight into the deliberations in a speech Thursday.“Today’s statement dialed back the dovish rhetoric of the prior statement, and as such suggests that the BoC is pretty firmly on hold for now,” Andrew Grantham, an economist at CIBC World Markets, said in a note.On the global outlook, policy makers said financial markets are being supported by easing measures by other central banks, and “waning recession concerns.” And while trade uncertainty persists, the Bank of Canada noted commodity prices and the currency have been stable.Investment MomentumDomestically, the central bank said gross domestic product came in as expected in the third quarter, driven higher by consumption and housing, as well as unexpected strength in investment. Policy makers, who had expected a decline in capital spending in the second half, said they will assess the extent to which the pickup “points to renewed momentum” in investment.The Bank of Canada reiterated that the recent record of core inflation around 2% is consistent with an economy operating near capacity. While inflation is expected to pick up in coming months, the acceleration should be temporary due to year over year movements in gasoline prices.One thing constraining the central bank is debt. Credit growth and real estate activity are re-accelerating in the second half of this year, propelled in part by lower interest rates imported from abroad, and any additional stimulus by the Bank of Canada could fuel risks.“The bank continues to monitor the evolution of financial vulnerabilities related to the household sector,” they said in the statement.(Updates with analyst comments in sixth and ninth paragraphs)To contact the reporters on this story: Erik Hertzberg in Ottawa at eschmitzhert@bloomberg.net;Theophilos Argitis in Ottawa at targitis@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Theophilos Argitis at targitis@bloomberg.net, Chris Fournier, Stephen WicaryFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Media Advisory - Olympian Jon Montgomery to join in raising millions to support children's charities at 35th CIBC Miracle Day
    CNW Group

    Media Advisory - Olympian Jon Montgomery to join in raising millions to support children's charities at 35th CIBC Miracle Day

    Media Advisory - Olympian Jon Montgomery to join in raising millions to support children's charities at 35th CIBC Miracle Day

  • Media Advisory - Normand Brathwaite, Bruny Surin and Caroline Ouellette to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities
    CNW Group

    Media Advisory - Normand Brathwaite, Bruny Surin and Caroline Ouellette to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities

    Media Advisory - Normand Brathwaite, Bruny Surin and Caroline Ouellette to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities

  • Media Advisory - Olympic Gold medalist John Morris to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities
    CNW Group

    Media Advisory - Olympic Gold medalist John Morris to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities

    Media Advisory - Olympic Gold medalist John Morris to join 35th anniversary of CIBC Miracle Day in raising millions for children's charities

  • Media Advisory - 35th anniversary of helping kids rise above to be marked with celebrities and giant "Thank You" card unveiling at King and Bay Streets on CIBC Miracle Day
    CNW Group

    Media Advisory - 35th anniversary of helping kids rise above to be marked with celebrities and giant "Thank You" card unveiling at King and Bay Streets on CIBC Miracle Day

    Media Advisory - 35th anniversary of helping kids rise above to be marked with celebrities and giant "Thank You" card unveiling at King and Bay Streets on CIBC Miracle Day