CMCSA - Comcast Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
44.36
+0.15 (+0.33%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

44.36 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:14PM EST

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Previous Close44.22
Open44.29
Bid44.37 x 800
Ask44.38 x 1300
Day's Range43.78 - 44.45
52 Week Range32.61 - 47.27
Volume14,995,646
Avg. Volume15,178,175
Market Cap201.805B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.08
PE Ratio (TTM)16.44
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.84 (1.90%)
Ex-Dividend Date2020-01-07
1y Target EstN/A
  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Comcast, NVIDIA, GlaxoSmithKline and Global Payments
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Comcast, NVIDIA, GlaxoSmithKline and Global Payments

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, Comcast, NVIDIA, GlaxoSmithKline and Global Payments

  • NBC taps Golf Channel's Molly Solomon to lead Olympic coverage production
    American City Business Journals

    NBC taps Golf Channel's Molly Solomon to lead Olympic coverage production

    NBC Sports has picked Golf Channel Exec Producer Molly Solomon to replace longtime Olympics production head Jim Bell, solidifying her position as the highest-ranking woman in television sports production. Solomon, who will retain her Golf Channel duties, will report to NBC Sports President Pete Bevacqua. Bell announced his departure on Nov. 4 after 29 years with NBC, leaving the net with the urgent task of finding a replacement only nine months before the Tokyo Games.

  • Disney: Streaming Hero or Supervillain?
    Bloomberg

    Disney: Streaming Hero or Supervillain?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The latest buzz in Hollywood is that the U.S. Justice Department wants to abolish an outdated rule known as the Paramount consent decree, which would allow studio giants to own movie theaters — something that hasn’t been permitted since the 1940s. My first thought was that it's a bit of a nothingburger. Studios like Warner Bros. and Universal probably aren’t eager to scoop up debt-laden cinema operators when their top priority is investing in streaming-TV content and services. And while mom-and-pop theaters may fear the change will breed anti-competitive behavior, that’s not as big of a concern for the big multiplex chains, nor does it signal an end to antitrust oversight. But that doesn’t mean everything is hunky-dory in the industry.Take a look at the U.S. box office this year. The content uniformity aside — four of the top seven movies descended from comic books, and the other three from cartoon franchises — most of the year’s leading films are Walt Disney Co. productions. There are more to come, with “Frozen 2” set to hits theaters on Friday, followed by the December release of “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.” It has me wondering, is this healthy? Disney films account for nearly a third of the $9.5 billion of cinema tickets sold so far in 2019. Warner Bros., owned by AT&T Inc., lags far behind with a 16% share, trailed by Comcast Corp.’s Universal and Sony Corp.’s namesake distribution business; 20th Century Fox would normally be high in the ranking, too, but Disney acquired it earlier this year as part of an $85 billion deal with Rupert Murdoch.Look, I get it. Lots of people love Disney’s Marvel and animated features, and the box office is simply reflecting that. The situation is more complicated than just looking at the data and determining that the company has too much power; there’s nothing about the industry structurally that would give it an unfair advantage. Disney has just done a really good job of consistently giving fans what they want, and CEO Bob Iger made a series of smart acquisitions that continue to pay off: Pixar in 2006; Marvel in 2009; and Lucasfilm (home of “Star Wars”) in 2012. They’ve all absolutely flourished within Disney, with each bringing with it beloved franchises and story lines just waiting to be further developed and amplified for the big screen.It’s not like Warner Bros., Universal and Sony haven’t had the same opportunities. Warner Bros. has DC Comics, “Harry Potter” and “Lord of the Rings,” and the studio shares a home with HBO and “Game of Thrones.” Sony owns the rights to Spider-Man; it even had the chance to buy the entire Marvel roster in the late 1990s (for pennies compared to what Disney paid). It's hard, though, to imagine Marvel would have become what it is today had it landed at Sony instead of Disney. And that’s kind of my point.Matthew Ball, the former Amazon Studios executive, made a similar argument recently: “Disney isn’t a monopoly,” he tweeted Nov. 5. “Its competitors just need to do better. ... You make success. No one believed in comics being huge 20 years ago.”It's conceivable that Disney may end up atop the streaming world, too. Apple TV+ hasn't lived up to the hype, while AT&T’s HBO Max may suffer for its delayed arrival to the market (in May 2020). In very Comcast fashion, the cable giant isn’t so much plunging into streaming as it is dipping a toe into the waters with its Peacock app next year. And Sony’s PlayStation Vue service has already thrown in the towel. Meanwhile, Disney+ had a wildly successful launch on Nov. 12, signing up 10 million subscribers on the first day, despite widespread technological glitches and shortcomings in app functionality. Disney is also the first to experiment with bundles, a relic of the cable-TV market that I’ve argued will help ease one of the worst consumer pain points of streaming: the inability to access all your favorite content through a single subscription.But when people are rooting for Disney to be the “Netflix killer,” they’re rooting against themselves. Netflix Inc.’s innovation brought us affordable TV entertainment that didn't require a cable subscription or patience for commercial breaks. Its success forced other more complacent companies to rethink their businesses. By contrast, the box office shows what happens when a single company winds up with outsize influence.The Justice Department’s move to terminate the Paramount consent decree may not mean much (Disney wasn’t even one of the studios bound by it). But Disney doesn’t need to buy a theater anyway — it already owns the box office. Other media and tech giants should take that as a warning to step up their streaming game. Healthy competition ensures better content, more choice and further Netflix-like advances. Plus, the world needs only so many superhero flicks.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tonight’s Democratic debate set to feature attacks on Pete Buttigieg as he leads Elizabeth Warren in Iowa
    MarketWatch

    Tonight’s Democratic debate set to feature attacks on Pete Buttigieg as he leads Elizabeth Warren in Iowa

    Since the past four Democratic debates have featured attacks on the current front-runner, it looks like Pete Buttigieg might as well wear a bull’s-eye to Wednesday night’s 10-person clash in Georgia.

  • Kathie Lee Gifford was ‘dying of loneliness,’ and here’s what she did to fix it — it could be worth a shot for you, too
    MarketWatch

    Kathie Lee Gifford was ‘dying of loneliness,’ and here’s what she did to fix it — it could be worth a shot for you, too

    Today is a new day for Kathie Lee Gifford. “That huge beautiful memory-filled home was like a morgue to me,” Gifford told the the Tennessean in an interview. So she recently moved to Franklin, Tenn. — a city about 20 miles south of Nashville. “I moved here because I was dying of loneliness,” she told the publication.

  • Everything Investors Need to Know About Disney+
    Zacks

    Everything Investors Need to Know About Disney+

    Here is everything investors need to know about Disney+ in under 60 seconds...

  • American City Business Journals

    IAAPA 2019: Disney's Star Wars, Universal's Potter rides win industry awards

    Three of the latest Orlando theme park additions by Walt Disney World and Universal Orlando Resort were recognized by the Themed Entertainment Association on Nov. 19. The awards, given during the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA) Expo at the Orange County Convention Center, honor some of the top rides, new lands, water parks, branding, museum and family entertainment centers from around the world. Here are the local rides honored with the Themed Entertainment Association's Thea Awards: Hagrid's Magical Creatures Motorbike Adventure at Universal's Islands of Adventure theme park: Outstanding Achievement Award in the attractions category Millennium Falcon Smugglers Run at Disney's (NYSE: DIS) Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge land in Disney's Hollywood Studios theme park in Orlando: Outstanding Achievement Award in the attractions category Disney's Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge - Outstanding Achievement Award in the new park land category Check out the gallery above for a look at the Orlando attractions that were spotlighted at the IAAPA Expo this year.

  • Top Analyst Reports for Apple, Comcast & NVIDIA
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Apple, Comcast & NVIDIA

    Top Analyst Reports for Apple, Comcast & NVIDIA

  • Farzetta, Gargano to host sports betting-centric 76ers telecast
    American City Business Journals

    Farzetta, Gargano to host sports betting-centric 76ers telecast

    NBC Sports BetCast will air during 10 games, featuring a focus on betting odds and how the flow of the game impacts those lines.

  • Reuters

    FCC chairman to propose dividing spectrum between auto safety, Wi-Fi use

    Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai will propose on Wednesday splitting a key band of spectrum that had been set aside for auto safety between Wi-Fi use and automakers, sources said. A block of 75 megahertz of spectrum was reserved in 1999 in the 5.9 GHz band for automakers to develop technology to allow vehicles to talk to each other but it has gone largely unused, Pai has said. Pai plans to propose shifting 45 MHz of the band for Wi-Fi use and use the remaining spectrum for auto safety communications, the sources said.

  • Cable Television Industry Near-Term Prospects Abundant
    Zacks

    Cable Television Industry Near-Term Prospects Abundant

    Cable Television Industry Near-Term Prospects Abundant

  • American City Business Journals

    Universal Orlando Resort kicks off holidays with Grinch, parades and more

    Universal Orlando Resort is bringing Christmas to Orlando early this year. The theme park giant's holiday celebrations for the year include parades, nighttime shows and, of course, that mean-one-turned-lovable-stinker The Grinch. All of this is a play to keep local theme parks fresh during winter, the region’s second-busiest tourist season.

  • Pete Bevacqua on NBC Sports’ next moves, the NFL, Olympics and more
    American City Business Journals

    Pete Bevacqua on NBC Sports’ next moves, the NFL, Olympics and more

    Charting NBC Sports’ next moves: NBC Sports Group Pete Bevacqua on the NFL, Peacock, Olympics and more

  • Investopedia

    Has Netflix Stock Bottomed Out?

    Long-term relative strength cycles predict that Netflix stock will hold the deep September low well into 2020.

  • Investopedia

    At Your Discretion

    Sector rotation strategies are in play. The discretionary sector could break out as the streaming battle heats up.

  • Mason Hawkins Sells Alphabet, General Electric
    GuruFocus.com

    Mason Hawkins Sells Alphabet, General Electric

    Guru's largest sales of the 3rd quarter Continue reading...

  • Hedge Funds Open Kimono: 5 Best Media Stocks To Buy
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Open Kimono: 5 Best Media Stocks To Buy

    We believe one of the best tools for ordinary investors who are on the hunt for new ideas is 13F filings. Once every quarter hedge funds with at least $100 million in total positions in publicly traded US stocks/options are required to open the kimono and disclose the number of shares and the total value of […]

  • 'Top Chef'-themed fast-casual eatery coming to Comcast Center
    American City Business Journals

    'Top Chef'-themed fast-casual eatery coming to Comcast Center

    A “Top Chef”-themed eatery will open at the Concourse at Comcast Center ahead of the popular television show’s season 17 premiere next year. Top Chef Quickfire, a fast-casual concept from Bravo and Philadelphia-based hospitality company Spectra, will feature dishes based on creations from the show. Monitors in the space will show clips from past seasons of "Top Chef," including clips from episodes where the dishes being served at Quickfire were created.

  • 'Friends' reboot? Why streaming giants are cashing in on revivals
    Yahoo Finance

    'Friends' reboot? Why streaming giants are cashing in on revivals

    “Friends” might be getting a reboot on HBO Max while Netflix secures a one-time licensing deal with Paramount for the fourth installment of “Beverly Hills Cop." Why reboots are all the rage as platforms look to beat out streaming competitors.

  • Reuters

    EXPLAINER-What's behind Labour's plan to overhaul BT and the British broadband network?

    Britain's opposition Labour Party says if it wins the Dec. 12 election it will nationalise BT's broadband network and provide free internet for all within a decade, a radical election pledge to roll back decades of private ownership. The UK's biggest broadband and mobile phone provider was the flagship of Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's policy of selling state-owned assets, a political revolution that she said would improve efficiency and "spread the nation's wealth among as many people as possible".

  • American City Business Journals

    This Universal patent may give rise to other future attractions

    Theme parks have to constantly think outside the box for each new attraction, as guests expect to feel or experience something they never have before. After all, new additions not only offer potential opportunities for new ride construction and a lure for repeat visitation, but new technology used in a ride also has the potential for additional uses in the commercial sector. In fact, another Universal patent, dubbed Ride Vehicle Elevator and Motion Actuator, published in early November appears to tackle how ride cars can change levels mid-ride via an elevator system while still staying within the ride’s story.

  • ‘Talking Car’ Dream Gives Way for Gadgets Under FCC Proposal
    Bloomberg

    ‘Talking Car’ Dream Gives Way for Gadgets Under FCC Proposal

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has proposed taking back some of the spectrum long promised to automakers and re-allocating it to other wireless uses, according to people familiar with the matter.It’s a potentially significant development in a years-long debate that saw automakers fight to retain frequencies they’ve barely used. Carmakers say they’re poised to finally use the airwaves to connect vehicles and infrastructure to prevent collisions.The FCC sent the proposal to the Transportation Department in recent days, said two people who asked not to be identified discussing the private deliberations. If DOT agrees, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai could set a Dec. 12 vote on the proposal to modify the grant of airwaves it made 20 years ago.The Transportation Department has long resisted the idea and remains concerned and will likely oppose the FCC’s latest plan, one of the people said.Representatives for both agencies declined to comment.Cable providers who offer Wi-Fi for customers’ wireless use are hungry for spectrum as digital technology transforms everything from cars to video feeds and household appliances.More airwaves are needed to help “deliver a future of ubiquitous connectivity,” Charter Communications Inc. said in a Nov. 12 filing. Charter’s network supports more than 300 million devices, the Stamford, Connecticut-based company said.Auto industry companies including General Motors Co., Toyota Motor Corp. and Denso Corp. spent more than a decade developing vehicle-to-vehicle, or “V2V,” communications systems to link cars, roadside beacons and traffic lights into a seamless wireless communication web to avoid collisions and heed speed limits. Yet deployments have been few, and no major automakers produce cars using the technology in the U.S.The auto industry has broadly shifted to favor a newer technology based on cellular systems, in part because it offers a path to transition to 5G systems in the future, proponents of the FCC’s plan say.Ford announced earlier this year that it will outfit all its new U.S. models starting in 2022 with cellular vehicle-to-everything technology. The system would enable Ford’s cars to communicate with one another about road hazards, talk to stop lights to smooth traffic flow and pay the bill automatically while picking up fast food.Automakers and their allies last year asked the FCC to let them use part of the band for cellular-based technology - rather than the Wi-Fi format the agency mandated in 1999 - while preserving all of the airwaves for transportation safety. In a petition the companies said the newer, cellular technology is more reliable, with greater range.The airwaves could be used for fast communications including machine-to-machine links, and smart city applications such as smart cameras, traffic monitoring and security sensors, NCTA-The Internet & Television Association, a trade group for companies including Comcast and Charter, told the FCC in a Sept. 25 filing.(Updates with Charter filing in seventh paragraph.)\--With assistance from Keith Naughton.To contact the reporters on this story: Ryan Beene in Washington at rbeene@bloomberg.net;Todd Shields in Washington at tshields3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Jeremy Corbyn Wants to Nationalize the Internet
    Bloomberg

    Jeremy Corbyn Wants to Nationalize the Internet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party is behind in the polls for the U.K. election so it’s unsurprising that he’s chucking out more giveaways to voters. The policy to nationalize BT Group Plc’s fixed-telecoms networks business and provide free fiber broadband to every British household is a humdinger nonetheless.Of course, the chances of this becoming reality are slim given that Corbyn’s best hope of becoming prime minister is a coalition with more moderate political parties. Yet the idea has stimulated even more debate than Labour’s previous plans to re-nationalize the railways and the energy utilities, so it’s at least worth thinking about. Taking it at face value, the policy would be a huge mistake that would achieve the opposite of its stated aim of accelerating Britain’s sluggish rollout of fiber broadband.First, there’s the cost. A Labour government would add 15 billion pounds ($19 billion) to an existing 5 billion pound broadband spending pot, according to Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell. Even assuming that would cover the required capital expenditure — a big assumption — it would cost at least the same again to nationalize Openreach, BT’s networks division.McDonnell says the state would pay for the acquisition by giving BT’s shareholders government bonds as compensation. Yet why would investors, especially those outside the U.K. protected by treaties against asset expropriation, exchange an 8.1% annual dividend yield from their BT stock for the less than 1% returns from U.K. gilts? The network spending itself would be funded by an increased tax on the likes of Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. But the G-20 will probably adopt new international tax standards next year to try to curb Big Tech’s avoidance tactics. So a Labour government might not even be able to whomp up these levies without breaching the new guidelines.Then there’s the speed of rolling out the networks. While the U.K. is well behind the pace on high-speed broadband rollout (it’s 10th in the European Union’s 2019 connectivity rankings), a tortured nationalization process isn’t the answer. BT would have no incentive to keep investing during that period.The same’s true for private competitors such as John Malone’s Virgin Media, Vodafone Group Plc and Comcast Corp.’s Sky. Increased competition has at least accelerated the pace of the rollout: The proportion of homes with fiber access has doubled in two years.Infrastructure investors have also been attracted by the returns promised by fiber, prompting a flurry of investment from KKR & Co., Macquarie’s infrastructure fund and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. McDonnell’s comments have certainly caused some consternation. TalkTalk Telecom Group Plc. said it had paused talks to sell a fiber project, for which Goldman-backed CityFibre Ltd. was the lead bidder. Should Labour ever get the chance to offer free broadband to everyone through a state-owned provider, tens of thousands of private sector jobs would be jeopardized. How would other companies be able to compete?And full-fiber broadband might not even really be necessary. The adoption of next-generation 5G mobile networks promises the ability to transmit far more data at far greater speeds. That would make fiber to every home redundant in parts of the country.There are better and more thoughtful ways to get fiber installed sooner: Making it easier to get permits to build the network; permanently reducing business tax rates for new fiber; and making it obligatory for customers to accept fiber upgrades. If McDonnell is willing to hand over 15 billion pounds to BT shareholders to snap up Openreach, why not use the funds to subsidize the rollout directly?To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Streaming outlook as 'Friends' reunion special heads to HBO Max: Hollywood Reporter
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Streaming outlook as 'Friends' reunion special heads to HBO Max: Hollywood Reporter

    A potential "Friends" reunion is reportedly in the works at HBO Max, while Netflix has nabbed a one-time licensing deal with Paramount for the fourth installment of "Beverly Hills Cop" starring Eddie Murphy. Why streaming giants are relying on reboots to attract consumers. Yahoo Finance's Alexandra Canal breaks it down. Zack Guzman & Emily McCormick, along with Strictly Cookies CFO Courtney Comstock, join in on the conversation.