CON.F - Continental Aktiengesellschaft

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
119.80
+0.34 (+0.28%)
As of 1:54PM CET. Market open.
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Previous Close119.46
Open120.10
Bid119.78 x 60000
Ask119.78 x 60000
Day's Range119.26 - 120.30
52 Week Range104.00 - 157.28
Volume398
Avg. Volume1,163
Market Cap24B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.41
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield4.75 (3.98%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-29
1y Target EstN/A
  • Germany's Car Jobs Boom Comes to a Screeching Halt
    Bloomberg

    Germany's Car Jobs Boom Comes to a Screeching Halt

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- After a week in which Daimler AG and Volkswagen AG’s Audi announced thousands of job cuts, it’s easy to forget that the German car industry once seemed unassailable.The 2009 recession forced a massive downsizing of America’s auto giants. General Motors Co. and Chrysler filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection; Ford Motor Co. escaped a similar fate only by cutting its workforce to the bone. By contrast, Volkswagen, BMW AG and Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz overcame the crisis with barely a scratch. Afterwards they took full advantage as wealthy Chinese splurged on luxury German vehicles. Germany’s carmakers and their suppliers went on a hiring spree at home and abroad.There were early signs of hubris: Volkswagen paid its chief executive officer 17.5 million euros ($19.3 million) in 2011. But Germany’s powerful trade unions made sure workers benefited too. In recent years production line staff at BMW and VW’s Porsche subsidiary took home almost 10,000 euros as an annual bonus. BMW spends an average of more than 100,000 euros per employee on salary, pension and social security costs, according to its annual report. Now that jobs boom has come to a screeching halt, and not before time. An industry facing unprecedented upheaval can’t afford such largess.The chief reason for the belt-tightening is, of course, the vast cost of moving beyond combustion engines. Volkswagen expects to spend an astonishing 60 billion euros on hybrid, electric and digital technology in the next five years. Doing this requires the hiring of even more people, but the products they’re developing aren’t always big money spinners yet.For a time, the industry will have to provide a full range of propulsion options. For their factories this means “peak complexity” — to borrow a phrase from Mercedes’s management. Eventually, however, many of these factory workers will become unnecessary because electric motors are much simpler to build than diesel and gasoline engines. Last week's job cuts won’t be the last.The German industry has been caught out too by an unexpected slowdown in demand. Continental AG, the supplier that’s cutting 20,000 jobs, expects production to stagnate over the next five years. Daimler said last month that sales haven’t matched its production capacity. Audi’s domestic plants are reportedly particularly under-utilized, not helped by the popularity of SUVs over sedans (the former tend to be built overseas).Volkswagen, BMW and Daimler will still generate about 24 billion euros of net profit this year, according to analysts polled by Bloomberg. But the era of 10% operating profit margins — long a benchmark for German luxury carmakers — is over. Mercedes thinks 4% is more realistic next year.The automakers therefore have to tackle their bloated fixed costs. In view of its spending commitments, Volkswagen was unwise to let its workforce swell to almost 700,000. That’s about 80% more than Japan’s Toyota Motor Corp., which builds a similar number of cars (though Volkswagen has a big truck unit too).Volkswagen’s labor expenses have crept higher as a percentage of sales since the last recession. Doubtless this reflects the influence of the German unions and hence it’ll be very difficult to rectify. Like their peers, German employees at the Volkswagen brand have job guarantees until 2029.Ultimately the German car jobs boom was a bet that demand would increase, combustion engines would have a long life and global trade would remain encumbered. Instead, the electric shift is happening faster than expected and Trump’s tariff crusades have turned the German industry’s global production presence into a liability.Cars are superfluous for many young people today, and if they do buy one it will soon have a simple electric motor, not a combustion engine made of hundreds of intricate components. The hiring practices of German carmakers look like a bubble that’s burst.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Continental gives gloomy auto sector outlook after multibillion-dollar loss
    MarketWatch

    Continental gives gloomy auto sector outlook after multibillion-dollar loss

    The German car parts supplier doesn’t expect a material improvement in global production over the next five years.

  • How Many Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) Shares Do Institutions Own?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Many Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) Shares Do Institutions Own?

    The big shareholder groups in Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) have power over the company. Large companies...

  • Reuters

    Challenged by electric cars, Brembo aims to put the brakes on noise

    Brembo's distinctive coloured brakes stop many of the world's fastest cars but when it comes to the electric vehicles of the future it faces a problem - traditional brakes are noisy. Brembo is developing lighter, electrical brake-by-wire mechanisms used in electric cars to replace traditional hydraulic brakes and faces a threat to its business from so-called regenerative braking systems that capture energy lost when cars slow down and pump it back into the battery. "Electric engines make no noise, so the braking system could eventually be annoying for the passengers," said Brembo's Executive Deputy Chairman Matteo Tiraboschi.

  • MarketWatch

    Continental to take 2.5 billion euro charge on view auto production won't improve

    Brake system and tire maker Continental AG said it's going to take a 2.5 billion euro ($2.8 billion) charge in the third quarter, on the planning assumption there will not be a material improvement in global light vehicle production during the upcoming five-year period. Continental said a significant portion of the impairment are attributable to acquisitions made before 2008. Continental said while the impairment will hit earnings, it's not expected to have a material impact on its setting of the dividend, and said preliminary third-quarter results have met analyst expectations.

  • Does Continental (ETR:CON) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Continental (ETR:CON) Have A Healthy Balance Sheet?

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' It's only natural to consider a company's...

  • Should Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Is Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with...

  • How Do Continental Aktiengesellschaft’s (ETR:CON) Returns Compare To Its Industry?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Do Continental Aktiengesellschaft’s (ETR:CON) Returns Compare To Its Industry?

    Today we'll look at Continental Aktiengesellschaft (ETR:CON) and reflect on its potential as an investment...

  • BMW & Co Are Losing Their Allure, and That’s Got Germany Worried
    Bloomberg

    BMW & Co Are Losing Their Allure, and That’s Got Germany Worried

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Germany is at a crossroads, and nowhere will that be more evident than at the Frankfurt auto show this week.Despite sleek new electric models like the Porsche Taycan, the traditional showcase of German automotive excellence risks becoming a platform for protest rather than preening, drawing attention to a generation of young consumers more likely to demonstrate against the car’s role in global warming than shop for a new VW, BMW or Mercedes-Benz.Autos have made Germany into a global manufacturing powerhouse, but pollution concerns -- intensified by Volkswagen AG’s 2015 diesel-cheating scandal -- have sullied the reputation of a product that once embodied individual freedom. More recently, trade woes and slowing economies have hit demand. The consequence is Germany’s car production slumping to the lowest level since at least 2010.“Investors have been fearful about the industry’s prospects for a number of years, and the list of things to worry about doesn’t seem to be getting shorter,” said Max Warburton, a London-based analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein. “There is a general sense that things are about to get worse.”The end of the combustion-engine era and car buyers more interested in data connectivity than horsepower threaten Germany’s spot at the top of the automotive pecking order. Signs of trouble abound. In addition to numerous profit warnings this year, Mercedes maker Daimler AG delayed a plan to expand capacity at a Hungarian factory, parts giant Continental AG has started talks to cut jobs, and automotive supplier Eisenmann filed for insolvency.The car’s fragile standing was evident in the reaction to a deadly accident in Berlin on Friday evening when a Porsche SUV crashed into a group of pedestrians. Stephan von Dassel, the mayor of the district where the incident took place, said on Twitter that “such tank-like vehicles” should be banned in the city.Germany is teetering on the brink of recession, and the auto industry is pivotal to the economy’s health. Carmakers such as Volkswagen, Daimler and BMW AG as well as parts suppliers like Robert Bosch GmbH and Continental employ about 830,000 people in the country and support everything from machine makers to advertising agencies and cleaning services. With factories from Portugal to Poland, the importance of the sector radiates across Europe as well.With emissions regulations set to tighten starting next year, concerns are mounting that companies across the country’s industrial landscape are ill-equipped to deal with the technology transition resulting from climate change and increasing levels of digitalization. IG Metall organized a demonstration in June, with more than 50,000 people rallying in Berlin, to draw attention to the risk of widespread layoffs from what Germany’s biggest industrial union calls “the transformation.”“Far too many companies stick their heads in the sand and rest on their laurels,” IG Metall Chairman Joerg Hofmann said. “If companies continue to act so defensively, they’re playing roulette with the futures of their workers.”The concern is that the future of Germany’s car towns could look something like Ruesselsheim. The home of the Opel brand, which once rivaled VW as the German leader, has faded along with the carmaker’s performance. After years of losses, it was sold in 2017 by General Motors Co. to France’s PSA Group, which is slashing the Opel’s 20,000-strong German workforce by nearly a fifth.“Everybody in Ruesselsheim is worried,” said Servet Ibrahimoglu, owner of a kebab restaurant down the street from Opel’s factory, adding that his business has dropped by a third. “Before at lunchtime, this place was full. Now there’s no one.”The auto industry’s efforts to adapt to the risks will be on display in Frankfurt, and the stakes couldn’t be higher for models like the VW ID.3. The battery-powered hatchback is the auto giant’s first effort in an aggressive push into electric cars, which will make its debut at the Germany’s premier auto exhibition.Under bright lights and blaring music, the show is a throwback to the auto industry’s glory days, but it’s fading as public interest in old-school car show wanes. Toyota, Volvo and Ferrari are among the 30 brands skipping the show. For those still there, the displays will predominantly feature traditional gas guzzlers and other cash cows. Land Rover will unveil a resurrected version of the Defender, the British brand’s iconic offroader.“Instead of presenting new mobility concepts for the future, we’ll see lots of SUVs on stands that have become few and far between,” said Ferdinand Dudenhoeffer, director of the University of Duisburg-Essen’s Center for Automotive Research. “The recession in the global auto business is forcing savings cuts for car manufacturers and suppliers, along with a rapid loss of attractiveness of the classic ‘analog’ car shows.”Make or BreakWhere German brands once tried to outdo one another with outlandish displays like indoor tracks and multistory exhibition spaces, the main drama may take place outside Frankfurt’s sprawling fairgrounds. Greenpeace and Germany’s BUND have called for a mass march on the site on Saturday, joined by groups of cyclists setting off from around Frankfurt to underscore their call for the end of the combustion engine. Organizers are expecting at least 10,000 people. “We’re in the middle of a climate crisis,” said Marion Thiemann, transport-policy expert at Greenpeace. “The biggest problem is the automobile industry.”Despite doubts from environmentalists, automakers have gotten the message that they’re facing a make-or-break moment. The industry is spending billions of euros to develop cleaner vehicles and counter the emergence of ride-sharing services like Uber Technologies Inc., which has a market value equivalent to Daimler, the inventor of the automobile.“I’m absolutely convinced that carmakers will adapt to the situation,” BMW’s labor head Manfred Schoch said during a testy panel discussion with activists in Berlin last week. “Those that don’t will go out of business.”(Adds comment from activist in third-to-last paragraph)\--With assistance from Kristie Pladson, Andrew Blackman and William Wilkes.To contact the reporters on this story: Christoph Rauwald in Frankfurt at crauwald@bloomberg.net;Carolynn Look in Frankfurt at clook4@bloomberg.net;Elisabeth Behrmann in Munich at ebehrmann1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Christoph Rauwald, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Potentially Undervalued?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Potentially Undervalued?

    Today we're going to take a look at the well-established Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON). The company's stock...

  • Why We’re Not Keen On Continental Aktiengesellschaft’s (FRA:CON) 6.6% Return On Capital
    Simply Wall St.

    Why We’re Not Keen On Continental Aktiengesellschaft’s (FRA:CON) 6.6% Return On Capital

    Today we are going to look at Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) to see whether it might be an attractive...

  • What Should Investors Know About Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Future?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should Investors Know About Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Future?

    Since Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) released its earnings in March 2019, analyst forecasts appear to be...

  • Here's How We Evaluate Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's How We Evaluate Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Dividend

    Today we'll take a closer look at Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) from a dividend investor's perspective...

  • How Should Investors React To Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) CEO Pay?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Should Investors React To Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) CEO Pay?

    Elmar Degenhart became the CEO of Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) in 2009. This analysis aims first to...

  • A Closer Look At Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Impressive ROE
    Simply Wall St.

    A Closer Look At Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) Impressive ROE

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

  • How Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Could Add Value To Your Portfolio
    Simply Wall St.

    How Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Could Add Value To Your Portfolio

    Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) is a stock with outstanding fundamental characteristics. When we build an...

  • With A -8.0% Earnings Drop, Is Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) A Concern?
    Simply Wall St.

    With A -8.0% Earnings Drop, Is Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) A Concern?

    Measuring Continental Aktiengesellschaft's (FRA:CON) track record of past performance is a valuable exercise for...

  • Imagine Owning Continental (FRA:CON) And Wondering If The 34% Share Price Slide Is Justified
    Simply Wall St.

    Imagine Owning Continental (FRA:CON) And Wondering If The 34% Share Price Slide Is Justified

    Want to participate in a short research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and you could win a $250 gift card! Passive investing in an index fund is a good way to ensure your own returns roughly match the overal...

  • Why Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Is A Financially Healthy Company
    Simply Wall St.

    Why Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON) Is A Financially Healthy Company

    Continental Aktiengesellschaft (FRA:CON), a large-cap worth €31b, comes to mind for investors seeking a strong and reliable stock investment. Most investors favour these big stocks due to their strong balance sheet and high market liq...