DAL - Delta Air Lines, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
56.85
+0.30 (+0.53%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close56.55
Open56.89
Bid56.75 x 1000
Ask56.93 x 3000
Day's Range56.82 - 57.23
52 Week Range45.08 - 63.44
Volume3,390,816
Avg. Volume5,993,620
Market Cap36.767B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.12
PE Ratio (TTM)8.04
EPS (TTM)7.07
Earnings DateJan 13, 2020 - Jan 17, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.61 (2.85%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-23
1y Target Est65.20
  • Is DAL Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Stock Chart Show
    Investor's Business Daily

    Is DAL Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Stock Chart Show

    Delta is a top-rated airline in IBD's database, helped by decent fundamentals and improving relative price strength. But is Delta stock a buy?

  • Benzinga

    Delta Refuses To Sweeten Alitalia Investment Offer

    In spite of competition from German flag carrier Lufthansa, U.S. major Delta Air Lines Inc. (NYSE: DAL) remains firm in an offer to take no more than a 10% stake in a reformed Alitalia. The Italian government is seeking €1 billion ($1.1 billion) in investment to relaunch Alitalia. "Delta is continuing to work with Ferrovie dello Stato (FS) and Atlantia and it can confirm that it is ready to invest up to €100 million for a 10% stake in Alitalia," a Delta spokesperson told Italian public news agency ANSA on Nov. 11.

  • Top Industrial Stocks for November 2019
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    Top Industrial Stocks for November 2019

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  • Here's how airlines rank for loyalty programs, which travelers say are increasingly confusing
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    Here's how airlines rank for loyalty programs, which travelers say are increasingly confusing

    A new J.D. Power report also found growing confusion among travelers about how loyalty programs work as changes are made.

  • 3 Airline Stocks to Trade Into 2020
    InvestorPlace

    3 Airline Stocks to Trade Into 2020

    Airline stocks historically have not had the best of reputations on Wall Street. For decades, they could not sustain their winning streaks for long. The perception was that they always found new ways of messing up, even while winning.But those days are over, because now when we fly, we get very few freebies. Passengers sometimes even have to pay extra to reserve a seat that they've already paid for. Checking luggage is also no longer always free.The bottom line is that airline stocks have cultivated taxing habits to enhance their bottom lines on a sustainable basis.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Cheap Stocks to Buy Under $10 Yet, the write-up today is to caution against going long these three airline stocks right now. This is not a knock against the companies themselves. In fact, about a month ago, I wrote about going long these very same stocks -- and the trades paid well quickly. But now the stocks of United Airlines (NASDAQ:UAL), Delta Airlines (NYSE:DAL) and Southwest Airlines (NYSE:LUV) will likely offer up better entry opportunities than current levels. Airline Stocks to Trade: United Airlines (UAL)United Airlines stock is cheap. It trades at an under 9x price-to-earnings ratio and 0.5 times sales. There is little fat to trim off this bone. However, this doesn't mean that the stock cannot fall.Since the bulls have fresh profits in hand, now is the best time to sit back and wait for another entry point before a new rally begins. Again, this is nothing against the company's fundamentals. As with all three opinions today, these are trading opportunities around the actual price action, not the value of the company.UAL stock chart looks vulnerable at these levels. A better entry point would be closer to $89 per share. So I would either buy the dip if and when it happens, or I would wait for a technical breakout to chase.If the United Airlines bulls can rise above $95 per share then they would invite momentum buyers. The ensuing rally would then target triple digits. But it is best to wait for a confirmation of the breakout. Delta Airlines (DAL)DAL stock rallied 15% off its earnings report. But the bad news is that it has set another lower high since its 52-week top of around $63 per share. Since it also has been setting higher lows, the range of the stock is tightening into a point. This usually gathers energy that would need to let loose. The direction of the move has yet to be determined, but we do know the lines that matter for it.The Delta bulls need to hold $56 and then $55 per share, or else they risk handing the momentum over back to the sellers. * 7 Great High-Yield Stocks With Payouts Over 5% There are a lot of fresh profits at risk. Easy money comes fast, but it also goes away at the drop of a hat. Conversely, the upside opportunity lies just above $58.50 per share. If the buyers can close above that level then they can continue the rally and breakout of the descending trend line of lower highs. If so, then the measured move would target the July highs. There will be heavy resistance near $60.50 per share. Southwest Airlines (LUV)Of the three companies here, LUV stock is the most expensive. It trades at a 13x P/E ratio which is 50% higher than either DAL or UAL. But in this case, the bulls got their money's worth. Year-to-date, LUV is up 23%, which is in line with the S&P 500 and about double the performance of the other two airline stocks.Nevertheless, this doesn't make Southwest stock a more attractive long investment here. Its chart also looks vulnerable to dips. A better entry point than now would be closer to $55 per share. It is best to either buy the dip to $55, or wait for a technical breakout to chase above $58.80.It is important to note that LUV stock is now inside a region that has been in contention for years. A breakout from those is not usually easy, but it would make for a good catalyst. If the bulls overcome the resistance, they can target a 10% rally from there.The general markets are near all-time highs, so conviction in any stock should be tempered. It won't take much to cause a correction from these altitudes, especially since Wall Street is still suffering from headline whiplash. Patience is a virtue in these airline stocks charts.Nicolas Chahine is the managing director of SellSpreads.com. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Join his live chat room for free here. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Stocks to Buy Under $10 * These 10 Stocks to Buy Make the Perfect 'Retirement' Portfolio * 5 Streaming Stocks to Buy for Huge Upside Over the Next Decade The post 3 Airline Stocks to Trade Into 2020 appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Sea-Tac Airport launches first phase of $156M airfield repair project
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    Sea-Tac Airport launches first phase of $156M airfield repair project

    Some older pavement is as thin as 14 inches, with the average being 16 inches thick, resulting in airfield assets continually needing emergency repairs. Modern airports require 20 or more inches of thickness.

  • Benzinga

    JetBlue Rolls Out Blue Basic, A Cheaper, No-Frills Fare

    JetBlue Airways Corporation (NASDAQ: JBLU) is moving to match competitors by offering a new basic economy fare for passengers who are willing to give up early seat selection and the ability to change a flight. JetBlue said Tuesday it would begin rolling out “Blue Basic” fares on a couple of routes. Most JetBlue flight searches Tuesday didn’t yet turn up the Blue Basic fares, so it’s hard to compare the new prices.

  • Moody's

    Atlanta (City of) GA -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Atlanta (City of) GA Airport Enterprise

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Atlanta (City of) GA Airport Enterprise and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • Barrons.com

    Buy JetBlue and United, but Avoid American as the MAX Jet Returns, Says UBS

    The bank launched coverage of the U.S. airlines. Analyst Myles Walton sees tough times ahead for the sector and recommends investors buy the carriers with the most growth potential.

  • International passenger declines not enough to slow SJC's rapid growth
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    San Jose International's September passenger report is the first to reveal the impact of losing three international airlines in a four-month period in fiscal year 2018-19

  • Delta (DAL) Up 8.4% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
    Zacks

    Delta (DAL) Up 8.4% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

    Delta (DAL) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

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  • Lufthansa only interested in 'restructured' Alitalia: CEO
    Reuters

    Lufthansa only interested in 'restructured' Alitalia: CEO

    German airline Lufthansa is only interested in investing in struggling Italian airline Alitalia [CAITLA.UL], which is running out of cash and racing to find new funds, once it has been restructured, its chief executive said on Thursday. "The technical restructuring of taking elements out, people out needs to be done by the current ownership before we can see ourselves getting involved here," Carsten Spohr told analysts after Lufthansa reported third quarter results. On Wednesday, Alitalia's administrators said they had no preferred option between Delta Air Lines and Lufthansa, the two groups talking with rail operator Ferrovie dello Stato about a rescue for the Italian carrier.

  • United Airlines, American and Delta likely facing slide in international travel, report says
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    United Airlines, American and Delta likely facing slide in international travel, report says

    The predictive metrics for international airline travel to the United States over the next six months aren't looking so hot, according to the U.S. Travel Association.

  • Southwest Airlines dips in October battle with Delta Air Lines for best on-time performance
    American City Business Journals

    Southwest Airlines dips in October battle with Delta Air Lines for best on-time performance

    Delta Air Lines finished October once again solidly ahead of its three principal rivals In the on-time arrivals derby, according to data released Wednesday by airline data behemoth OAG. There has been little doubt for a long time that Delta is the clear leader in on-time performance among the four largest United States-based carriers, which include American Airlines (NASDAQ: AAL), United Airlines (NASDAQ: UAL) and Southwest Airlines (NYSE: LUV). Delta (NYSE: DAL) finished October with 85.6 percent of flights arriving at the gate on time.

  • Airline Stock Roundup: Q3 Earnings Beat at SKYW & GOL, DAL's Traffic & More
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    Airline Stock Roundup: Q3 Earnings Beat at SKYW & GOL, DAL's Traffic & More

    While fleet-modernization efforts aid SkyWest's (SKYW) third-quarter performance, solid demand for air travel in the corporate segment boosts Gol Linhas' (GOL) results.

  • Delta’s Traffic Outgrew Its Capacity in October
    Market Realist

    Delta’s Traffic Outgrew Its Capacity in October

    Delta Air Lines reported its October operating metrics on Monday. Delta's traffic outgrew its capacity, expanding by 5.2% year-over-year.

  • Reuters

    Alitalia administrators neutral on Delta, Lufthansa offers

    Alitalia's administrators said they had no preferred option between Delta Air Lines and Lufthansa, the two groups talking with rail operator Ferrovie dello Stato about a rescue for the troubled Italian carrier. Ferrovie, which is leading a state-orchestrated effort to rescue Alitalia, will have to choose between the two foreign carriers in the next weeks as the financial performance of Alitalia was deteriorating, the administrators said. "We do not have any preference about the industrial partner for Alitalia, we are unbiased," Daniele Discepolo, one of the three administrators in charge of the airline told a parliamentary hearing.

  • Sea-Tac Airport bungles leases, takes back tenant space amid $1M payouts
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    Sea-Tac Airport bungles leases, takes back tenant space amid $1M payouts

    The payouts have triggered pointed questions from Port of Seattle commissioners and highlighted planning flaws by airport officials.

  • United Airlines and American watch as Delta lifts curtain on new economy product
    American City Business Journals

    United Airlines and American watch as Delta lifts curtain on new economy product

    Delta's dramatically-enhanced international economy cabin product is sure to be a game changer in the battle among U.S.-based airlines to gain more international traffic.

  • Tom Gayner Continues to Buy Alphabet, Amazon
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  • Delta extends reach within Georgia, debuts 'reinvented' international cabin
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    Delta extends reach within Georgia, debuts 'reinvented' international cabin

    Delta boosted its investment both near and far with new flights within Georgia as well as debuting its "reinvented" international Main Cabin service

  • Aviation professionals are seeing effects of pilot shortage: BAML survey
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    Aviation professionals are seeing effects of pilot shortage: BAML survey

    There is a shortage of pilots, according to a new Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey of aviation industry professionals.

  • Bloomberg

    Microsoft Wants to Teach Drones, Robots and Drills How to Think

    (Bloomberg) -- Microsoft Corp. and technology rivals spend a lot of time talking about machine learning. Now Microsoft is talking about something called machine teaching.No, the software maker doesn't plan to send robots into classrooms. In a world where factories and wind farms will increasingly run on autonomous systems, drones will criss-cross cities delivering packages and robots will operate in underground mines, Microsoft wants to make the software that helps mechanical and chemical engineers teach those devices how to behave, where to go and how to maintain safe conditions.Microsoft last year acquired a company called Bonsai that makes this kind of software, merged it with some work from its research arm — a group of Microsoft researchers wrote a paper on this idea back in 2017 — and  is now expanding a software preview so more potential customers can test it. As the company tries to sell more of its Azure cloud software to industrial companies, it aims to make these kinds of autonomous programs a profitable part of that portfolio. Many consumers will be most familiar with this kind of software as it exists in self-driving cars, but Microsoft plans to leave that part of the market to the Teslas of the world.Delta Air Lines Inc. is running a project to improve their baggage handling using the technology, Microsoft will announce Monday. Royal Dutch Shell Plc is trying out the software to control drilling equipment, while Schneider Electric SE is seeing how it works with electric heating and cooling controls for buildings, said Mark Hammond,  founder and chief executive officer of Bonsai, who is now a general manager at Microsoft. A Microsoft partner based near that company’s Redmond, Washington, headquarters wants to use it for tractors and Carnegie Mellon University deployed the software as part of a mine-exploration robot that recently won a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency challenge.  Microsoft has also suggested the software could work well for drones that check power lines and wind turbines and for disaster recovery operations where autonomous devices scout out the situations that may not be safe for human rescuers.“The industry is fixated on autonomous driving and that’s it, but if you look around you in the world, you can find literally hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of scenarios where automation can improve things,” said Gurdeep Pall, Microsoft vice president, business AI.  “A lot of these folks who build these systems are mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, etc. They are not AI people. We are bringing AI to these engineers in a way that they can operate.”In May, Microsoft began a limited preview of the software that extended to about 50 customers. On Monday at Microsoft’s Ignite conference in Orlando, CEO Satya Nadella will announce an expansion of that program to about 200 companies and likely more after that. The company won’t yet say when it will be broadly available.The software allows engineers to set up rules and criteria for how autonomous devices should operate, anything from where a robot arm should start, what it should do next and all the different possibilities. Then engineers use simulation software — either from Microsoft or its partners — to set up a series of lessons, a digital curriculum. “It’s not randomly exploring, it’s exploring in a way that’s guided by the teacher,” Hammond said. And once you have the curriculum, the system automates the process of teaching and learning, across hundreds or thousands of simulations at the same time. Microsoft partner Fresh Consulting is working with several customers to figure out how to program devices and vehicles with Microsoft’s tools. One such customer is  industrial equipment rental company United Rentals, and Fresh wants to use Microsoft’s product to better control compact track loaders, which need to work in uneven terrain and mud. The software can also be useful in construction and warehouse work. “These are dirty, dangerous and dull jobs, and there's not enough people, said CEO Jeff Dance. Microsoft is also partnering with MathWorks Inc., which makes simulation and modeling software used by companies like Toyota and Airbus, to allow its programs to work with Microsoft’s. Microsoft said its autonomous software approach blends the power of human experience with the ability to adapt to changing situations through a type of AI called reinforcement learning. For example, Shell is using the tools to teach its drills. Shell could program drills the old fashioned way, with a series of rules put in by the human experts, Hammond said. But that would require lots of time reprogramming each drill every time it’s used on different terrain. A reinforcement learning system — like those used to teach machines how to play video games better than humans — could learn how to do it alone. But for industrial tasks, reinforcement learning with human knowledge and guidance works better, Hammond said. Without it, systems may come to conclusions that don’t make sense in the real world. Software for factories, equipment and industrial applications is often very specific and made by companies in those industries rather than large, general purpose software makers like Microsoft. And many of those vendors are also working on systems for increasing autonomous control. Microsoft also wants to sell other products, from cloud services to HoloLens augmented reality goggles to construction and industrial firms. Meanwhile its cloud rival Amazon.com Inc. is trying to leverage expertise in logistics and warehouse automation to sell services to industrial companies, said Nick McQuire, an analyst at market research firm CCS Insight. Amazon and Google are also working on AI learning techniques with robots and on programs that promise to enable engineers without AI expertise to program complicated AI models. Rather than try to compete with industrial tech vendors, Microsoft wants to partner with them, Pall said.“It's a big market, but a very difficult one to target in terms of the complexity and the legacy systems, and a lot of those systems are highly mission critical,” McQuire said. “It's going to take some time, but Microsoft is starting to position a lot of its products for it.”Microsoft also made other announcements at the conference including:A new Office mobile app that combines Word, Excel and PowerPoint into one app instead of separate ones. Outlook for iOS will now be able to read a user’s emails out loud and share changes to their day. And now there’s a male voice available instead of Microsoft’s usual female Cortana voice assistant. In a bid to be more helpful, Cortana can now scan users’ email and send a single “briefing” document with all the things they’ve promised to do each day, as well as a summary of meetings and relevant documents.  Microsoft’s Azure cloud division is unveiling a new program for data analytics called Azure Synapse Analytics and new technologies for using Azure tools to manage Linux and Windows Servers located in a customers own data centers or multiple clouds.  To contact the author of this story: Dina Bass in Seattle at dbass2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew Pollack at apollack1@bloomberg.net, Robin AjelloFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.