DIO.F - Christian Dior SE

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
442.00
-2.00 (-0.45%)
As of 10:21AM CET. Market open.
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Previous Close444.00
Open442.00
Bid443.20 x 25000
Ask445.80 x 25000
Day's Range442.00 - 442.00
52 Week Range327.40 - 496.80
Volume3
Avg. Volume4
Market Cap78B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.79
PE Ratio (TTM)29.74
EPS (TTM)14.86
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield6.20 (1.40%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-12-06
1y Target EstN/A
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  • Christian Dior's Book Bags Are Red Hot Right Now
    Bloomberg

    Christian Dior's Book Bags Are Red Hot Right Now

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Despite the pressures piling onto the luxury industry, LVMH has pulled a great performance out of its roomy monogrammed bag.Sales excluding currency movements rose by 11% in the three months to Sept. 30, better than the consensus of analysts’ forecasts of 9.2%. That’s creditable given the ongoing disruption in Hong Kong.Don’t be lulled into a false sense of security, though. LVMH is the world’s biggest luxury group, with a broad geographic reach and a portfolio spanning fashion to spirits. Not all of the sales reports from high-end sellers in the coming weeks will be as alluring.Purveyors of bling have enjoyed more than three years of frantic growth, driven primarily by Chinese consumers, who account for about a third of sales and have snapped up Christian Dior book bags and Balenciaga sneakers. Some slowdown was inevitable. Despite the reassurance from LVMH, the risk of a hard landing, rather than a gentle deceleration, is rising.LVMH’s fashion and leather goods sales growth of 19% was much stronger than the consensus for a 15% expansion. That indicates that many purchases that would have been made in Hong Kong were diverted to the mainland, or to other Asian shopping destinations. The group has about 1,340 stores across Asia excluding Japan, so it can pick up sales wherever they are made. It helps that the Christian Dior brand is red hot right now, too. Even so, Bernstein forecasts that the protests will shave 0.6-1.2 percentage points off of the entire industry’s growth rate this year, so that expansion will be a figure in the mid-single digits.That’s not disastrous. But Hong Kong isn’t the only cloud on the high-end horizon. Trade tensions between the U.S. and China continue to simmer. So far, consumers appear to be adapting to the new reality. But some data points are more worrying. For example, Chinese consumer confidence slipped in July. Analysts at Citigroup have also noted the potential for Japanese sales to be hurt by the recent increase in the country’s consumption tax from 8% to 10%.And it is not just Asia that luxury-goods groups have to fret about.In general, consumers are more willing to splurge on things they can’t really afford, or don’t really need, when they’re feeling confident and flush with cash. With political turmoil on both sides of the Atlantic, and concerns mounting about economic growth, that’s unlikely to be the case. LVMH said it made “good progress” in the U.S. But increasing fears of a downturn next year will do nothing to encourage spending there.Like LVMH, Kering SA also has a broad reach, but it’s navigating Gucci’s transition from stellar to steady growth.  Conditions are not ideal for those groups trying to revive their performances, such as Prada SpA and Salvatore Ferragamo SpA, although there are signs that Burberry Group Plc is gaining momentum with young Chinese shoppers.There’s another reason why the pain might not be spread evenly. With fat margins, and little debt, the biggest groups have plenty of scope to invest. If they keep up capital expenditure when times are tough, they can emerge even stronger. Louis Vuitton designing clothing for characters in the popular fantasy game League of Legends is a case in point. As all of the industry’s growth is coming from the under 40s, investments that appeal to the cool kids are wise. The big groups also have the balance-sheet firepower to make acquisitions.Share prices have been hurt since mid-September by the escalation of protests in Hong Kong. Even so, the Bloomberg Intelligence top luxury peer group trades on a forward price-earnings ratio of about 22 times. That’s a decline to be sure, but it’s not that far off the peak of about 27 in June 2018.Bernard Arnault, chairman of LVMH, has bemoaned high valuations as a barrier to deals. There may still be some way to go until prices are more palatable. But if nascent industry woes become more pronounced, he may finally get his chance to swoop. \--With assistance from Nisha Gopalan.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Do Your Gucci Loafers Make You Feel Ashamed?
    Bloomberg

    Do Your Gucci Loafers Make You Feel Ashamed?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- “Flygskam” (or flight shame) has made some people too embarrassed to fly because of the damage to the planet. Might fashion be the next business to suffer as consumers put on their environmental hair shirts?Bernard Arnault, chairman of luxury behemoth LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE, has criticized the 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg as being “demoralizing for young people.” She’s probably a bit of a downer for him too.Arnault’s business depends on shoppers, especially young ones, buying lots of unnecessary stuff, from Christian Dior saddlebags to expensive lipsticks from the pop star Rihanna’s Fenty range. Fretting about an impending environmental catastrophe, and worrying that your purchases are contributing to it, is hardly conducive to a spot of retail therapy.The clothing and footwear industries (of which luxury is only a part) contribute about 8% of global C02 emissions, according to Quantis, an environmental consultancy. The Ellen MacArthur foundation, a non-profit organization, estimates that the textiles business generated more greenhouse gas emissions in 2015 than all international flights and shipping combined. There’s plenty here to infuriate Thunberg.Reliable data on the luxury industry’s environmental performance isn’t easy to come by, but one group (made up of Global Fashion Agenda, an industry forum, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition and the Boston Consulting Group) has had a go at creating at a scorecard. This “Pulse Score” is based on elements such as the ecological smartness of product design, raw material use and manufacturing processes. Getting 100 would be perfection on sustainability; nobody comes close to that.Overall, fashion had a pretty underwhelming score of 42 out of 100, although the big luxury companies scored a slightly more respectable 54. While this isn’t exactly cause to celebrate, it does show that the financial clout of LVMH — and its big peers such as Gucci-owning Kering SA and Switzerland’s Compagnie Financiere Richemont SA (home to Cartier) —  might be an advantage when it comes to trying to mitigate their impact on the planet and its resources.Yet one can’t ignore the scale of that industry impact. The luxury goods makers have enjoyed more than three years of blockbuster growth, driven largely by Chinese shoppers, meaning they’re gobbling up more natural resources than ever. And as the chart below shows, the natural materials favored by the fashionable elite have the worst effect on the environment (silk is a particular disaster).   None of this is helped by the wasteful practices of many shoppers, who move on quickly to the next hot design, or indeed some of the companies. Britain’s Burberry Group Plc came under justified fire last year for its now abandoned practice of destroying unsold stock to prevent it being sold off cheaply.Kering, founded by Arnault’s great rival Francois Pinault, does at least try to be transparent about the damage it does. It publishes an environmental profit and loss account, which put the cost of its impact on the planet in 2018 at about 500 million euros ($549 million). It estimates that about three-quarters of this came from raw materials processing and production. Still, while it’s honest of them to publish these data, the harm is still being done.LVMH has kept a lower profile, though it does perform well on one measure. Morgan Stanley analysts say that the more a luxury company does its own manufacturing, the better it performs on environmental, social and governance targets. That’s because some of the worst industry practices happen in the supply chain away from the direct control — and responsibility — of the parent. The LVMH brands rank well on this measure, according to the Morgan Stanley research. Three of its brands (Loro Piana, Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior) do most of their own manufacturing.As Arnault’s attack on Thunberg highlighted, there’s a reason why these companies are trying to mend their ways: younger shoppers, including Chinese ones, are demanding it. In 2018 all of the industry’s growth came from the under-40s, according to consultants at Bain & Company. Those consumers are more likely to be loyal to brands with a conscience. Yet no matter how much attention the industry pays to the planet, this business is still about getting people to spend money on stuff they could live without. If the rich can be shamed into giving up their far-flung holidays, what does the future hold for Gucci’s diamond belt?\--With assistance from Elaine He and Lara Williams.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Reuters

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    Christian Dior presented a wardrobe fit for glamorous eco-warriors in Paris on Tuesday, as models showed off looks dotted in wild flowers on a catwalk lined with trees set to be replanted around the city. Dior, part of luxury group LVMH, is one of the first major French brands to kick off Paris Fashion Week, with the likes of Kering's Saint Laurent and independent Chanel also set to showcase looks for next spring and summer. Hot on the heels of runway shows in New York, London and Milan, where some labels as well as organisers sought to address consumer concerns over the industry's green credentials, Paris is also looking to improve its environmental record.

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    Reuters

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    PARIS/MILAN (Reuters) - Jacket maker Moncler joined Louis Vuitton owner LVMH on Wednesday in reporting a pick up in sales growth in the second quarter, as the luxury firms capitalised on strong Chinese demand and investments in marketing and new designs. "With Chinese customers, there was a noticeable improvement between the first quarter and the second quarter," LVMH's Financial Director Jean-Jacques Guiony told analysts.

  • CNBC

    LVMH launching 'Fenty,' a new fashion house developed by Rihanna

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  • Reuters

    Dior gowns that made headlines star in London exhibition

    From Princess Margaret's 21st birthday gown to Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence's red carpet dress, Christian Dior outfits that have made headlines go on show in a London exhibition dedicated to the French fashion house. With a supporting cast of accessories, sketches and perfume bottles, "Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams" takes a close look at the history of the luxury brand he founded in 1946 and which remains the epitome of haute couture. "Not only did (Dior) ... revolutionise fashion design ... but he was also important in how he did business," Oriole Cullen, Fashion and Textiles curator at the V&A, told Reuters.

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    CBS News Videos

    LVMH planning to buy Tiffany for $16.2 billion

    French luxury group LVMH has agreed to buy iconic New York jeweler Tiffany and Co. for $16.2 billion, adding a famed star to its portfolio that already boasts Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Bulgari. CBSN Los Angeles reports.

  • Dior's 'love affair' with Britain en vogue in London
    Reuters Videos

    Dior's 'love affair' with Britain en vogue in London

    The legendary French fashion designer Christian Dior, who had a love affair with Britain, will have his elegant outfits displayed at an exhibition in London next month. Colette Luke has more.