DM2.F - De.mem Limited

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
0.0935
-0.0075 (-7.43%)
At close: 6:03PM CET
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Previous Close0.1010
Open0.0945
Bid0.0935 x 0
Ask0.1060 x 0
Day's Range0.0935 - 0.0945
52 Week Range0.0495 - 0.1970
Volume1,500
Avg. Volume23
Market Cap12.693M
Beta (5Y Monthly)2.02
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.0410
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • Investors Who Bought De.mem (ASX:DEM) Shares A Year Ago Are Now Up 89%
    Simply Wall St.

    Investors Who Bought De.mem (ASX:DEM) Shares A Year Ago Are Now Up 89%

    Passive investing in index funds can generate returns that roughly match the overall market. But if you pick the right...

  • What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of De.mem Limited (ASX:DEM)?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of De.mem Limited (ASX:DEM)?

    If you want to know who really controls De.mem Limited (ASX:DEM), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Apple's would-be sapphire glass supplier charged with fraud
    Engadget

    Apple's would-be sapphire glass supplier charged with fraud

    Not that long ago, Apple was going to build iPhone screens using sapphire glass, but that didn't work out so well. It loaned $578 million to a company called GT Advanced Technologies, which was supposed to build highly scratch-resistant screen covers from synthetic sapphire crystals. Instead, it produced flawed "boules" of sapphire that couldn't be cut into displays and went bankrupt months after it started. Now, the SEC has announced that it's charging the company and its ex-CEO with fraud for allegedly withholding key information from stockholders.

  • SEC hits failed Apple sapphire glass manufacturer with fraud charges
    TechCrunch

    SEC hits failed Apple sapphire glass manufacturer with fraud charges

    Way back in 2013, Apple spent a whopping $578 million on sapphire glass. The sum, spread out over four installments, was an advance to GT Advanced Technologies. Already in use on the company’s home buttons and camera, the plan was to implement the extremely hard material on a larger scale, replacing Gorilla Glass in the process.