DTEGY - Deutsche Telekom AG

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
17.40
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 12:07PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close17.40
Open17.33
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range17.30 - 17.41
52 Week Range15.24 - 17.95
Volume19,889
Avg. Volume293,217
Market Cap83.339B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.11
PE Ratio (TTM)18.01
EPS (TTM)0.97
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.78 (4.50%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-03-29
1y Target Est20.03
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Aggressive Dealmaking Drives Europe's Most Expensive Stock
    Bloomberg6 hours ago

    Aggressive Dealmaking Drives Europe's Most Expensive Stock

    (Bloomberg) -- Combining two badly performing industries usually doesn’t make them any better. Yet that’s what’s underpinning Europe’s most expensive stock.Spain’s Cellnex Telecom SA has become the highest-valued stock on the regional benchmark by serving as a landlord to the ailing telecom industry. While real estate and telecom are among the worst performers on the Stoxx 600 Index this year, Cellnex has soared after snapping up towers from carriers eager to convert their assets to cash, helping them keep up with network investments.“They are in a very sweet spot,” Neil Campling, an analyst at Mirabaud, said by phone. “The only worry at the moment for me is that the stock has moved an awful long way in a very, very short space of time.”The tower company model is fairly new to Europe, in contrast with the U.S., where American Tower Corp. and Crown Castle International Corp. began buying communication sites in the mid-1990s. Since its initial public offering in 2015, Cellnex has seized the relatively open field with aggressive dealmaking, spending 2.7 billion euros ($3.1 billion) just last month on more than 10,000 towers in Italy, France and Switzerland.The company looks set to continue its acquisition spree -- it announced on Tuesday the issuance of as much as 850 million euros in a nine-year convertible bond to fund purchases. The company has increased the number of network infrastructure sites in its portfolio by six-fold to about 45,000 in the past 4.5 years, including ones it has agreements on building for clients.Cellnex has gained nearly 60% in the first half, taking this year’s estimated price-to-earnings ratio to an eye-watering 131, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That’s beyond such high-growth companies as the Dutch payments prodigy Adyen NA, or computer-games maker CD Projekt SA, which is about to publish its most-hyped title ever. Cellnex declined to comment on the valuation.While Cellnex’s expected revenue growth is much slower than the other names at the top, the surveyed 12 analysts estimate its earnings per share to nearly double from 2019 to 2021. Tower stocks have showed up on investors’ radar thanks to their stable cash flows and good visibility: smaller Italian peer Inwit SpA has also had a good year with a 43% gain so far. Tower contracts are usually signed for a decade or two.“There is a premium being paid for corporates that offer visibility,’’ Guy Peddy, an analyst at Macquarie, said by phone. “Cellnex is the only clear, European, free-from-ownership-issues, tower-focused operator.”Cellnex’s biggest shareholder is Italy’s Benetton family, which owns about 30% of the stock via its investment company Edizione. The family is said to be backing former Telecom Italia SpA head Franco Bernabe to replace Marco Patuano as chairman, Bloomberg reported Monday, citing people familiar with the matter.During the stellar run of the second quarter, Cellnex shares have mostly traded above the average price target, leaving analysts to play catch-up. The gap became the widest ever this week at 3 euros and currently implies a 4.8% downside to the stock, according to 27 estimates in a Bloomberg survey.In Europe, the share of telecommunications infrastructure held by independent tower companies is low compared with other regions, according to an April report by accounting and consultancy firm EY and the European Wireless Infrastructure Association (EWIA). The share of independent tower firms was a mere 17% in 2017, compared with 67% in North America and 42% in the Caribbean and Latin America. Operators could free up 28 billion euros if that share grew to 50%, the report estimates.Race to BuyOne risk to Cellnex’s tower campaign across Europe is competition for assets. The region’s emerging tower business is “not a one-horse race,” analysts at Kempen warned in a note last month, saying that Cellnex losing out on deals could lead to investor disappointment. In 2016, American Towers teamed up with Dutch pension fund PGGM Fondsenbeheer BV, beating Cellnex to win Antin Infrastructure Partners’ French phone towers.While American Towers has been more focused on emerging markets since, there’s a possibility that a private equity firm such as KKR & Co. Inc. would join the party, Giles Thorne, an analyst at Jefferies said in a note on Tuesday, keeping his buy rating and raising his price target by more than 50%.“The one candidate that has the assets and scope on paper to replicate Cellnex’s march across Europe is KKR,” Thorne said. “Its actions suggest it doesn’t see the regional synergy case for cross-border M&A. This may yet change.”Additionally, some telecom carriers see network quality as an important competitive advantage and are reluctant to relinquish control of their top sites. Tim Hoettges, chief executive officer of Deutsche Telekom AG -- which is not a client of Cellnex -- has spoken of “golden sites” as a category of differentiating network infrastructure locations the company wouldn’t be willing to share.Yet overall, tower companies are well placed to benefit from industry-specific drivers, including increased data consumption, Josh Sambrook-Smith, a thematic equity analyst at Sarasin & Partners, said by phone.“You have all the other super exciting, long-term trends,” said Sambrook-Smith. “This is just a relatively safe way to play it.”(Updates share prices from the 6th paragraph, chart)To contact the reporter on this story: Kit Rees in London at krees1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Beth Mellor at bmellor@bloomberg.net, Kasper Viita, Celeste PerriFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reutersyesterday

    Deutsche Telekom wins SK Telecom backing for venture arm; 5G JV agreed

    Deutsche Telekom's venture capital arm said on Tuesday it was closing its second fund to new money after raising $350 million to invest in software service companies that are powering digital transformation. Corporate sponsors SK Telecom of Korea and German optics company Zeiss have joined Deutsche Telekom, HarbourVest, Neuberger Bermann and others in backing the fund, Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners (DTCP) said. SK Telecom's $30 million investment is part of a wider agreement with Deutsche Telekom to set up a joint venture to develop technologies and services for next-generation 5G mobile networks, the Korean company said separately.

  • Reutersyesterday

    UPDATE 1-Deutsche Telekom wins SK Telecom backing for venture arm; 5G JV agreed

    Deutsche Telekom's venture capital arm said on Tuesday it was closing its second fund to new money after raising $350 million to invest in software service companies that are powering digital transformation. Corporate sponsors SK Telecom of Korea and German optics company Zeiss have joined Deutsche Telekom, HarbourVest, Neuberger Bermann and others in backing the fund, Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners (DTCP) said.

  • Deutsche Telekom wins SK Telecom backing for venture arm; 5G joint venture agreed
    Reutersyesterday

    Deutsche Telekom wins SK Telecom backing for venture arm; 5G joint venture agreed

    Deutsche Telekom's venture capital arm said on Tuesday it was closing its second fund to new money after raising $350 million to invest in software service companies that are powering digital transformation. Corporate sponsors SK Telecom of Korea and German optics company Zeiss have joined Deutsche Telekom, HarbourVest, Neuberger Bermann and others in backing the fund, Deutsche Telekom Capital Partners (DTCP) said. SK Telecom's $30 million investment is part of a wider agreement with Deutsche Telekom to set up a joint venture to develop technologies and services for next-generation 5G mobile networks, the Korean company said separately.

  • Amazon Lives on the Edge, and Telecoms Should Tremble
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Amazon Lives on the Edge, and Telecoms Should Tremble

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- 5G networks will allow vast gobs of data to be transmitted at great speeds. And more data usually means more money for mobile carriers like Deutsche Telekom AG and AT&T Inc. But there’s a hitch. Cloud giants such as Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc. and Microsoft Corp. are lurking.The new tech enables ever more computational decision-making to be carried out by powerful processors sitting in the cloud. But when even a few milliseconds of lag can be a problem – as might be the case with high-frequency trading or connected factories – it’s worth trying to slash the time it takes to reach a cloud server.That’s why the cloud giants are pushing what’s known as edge computing: where cloud functions run on servers that are physically closer to the end user, thereby cutting the distance to a computer making a given decision. They’re at the “edge” of the network. It’s a feature of the distributed cloud, where different functions are distributed across different parts of a network.For telecoms firms that could be a problem. They’re terrified of spending hundreds of billions of dollars on upgrading their networks, only to become the providers of dumb pipes exploited by technology behemoths, and miss the most profitable opportunities the investments could generate. They don’t want a repeat of WhatsApp, whose free messaging platform gobbled up carriers’ SMS revenues.The main cloud providers – Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.  – have a headstart when it comes to exploiting these opportunities. They have huge customer bases and developer ecosystems, in addition to their existing hordes of servers. In short, they have scale.It would therefore be foolish for a telco to try to build a cloud offering to rival that scale, according to Nick McQuire, head of enterprise research at CCS Insight. They seem to recognize this, and are instead trying to ensure they’re the gatekeepers for their customers’ relationships with the cloud operators. Unfortunately for the network firms, the lock they have on those relationships can be tenuous.There are different ways carriers can try to control them. Just this month, Spain’s Telefonica SA announced it would sell Google Cloud solutions globally. Alone, that’s unlikely to generate much profit. But by inserting themselves into the transaction, they hope to be in prime position to offer additional lucrative services that run on a third party’s cloud. And when it comes to small- and medium-sized enterprises, network firms’ extensive local teams can offer comprehensive solutions. It’s less scalable than what the cloud operators do, but it’s still an opportunity.Others such as France’s Orange SA think that owning the cybersecurity layer is the best way to manage the process. That encryption key ensures they control enterprise customers’ cloud access, also making it easier to sell value-added services. Both approaches are a gamble. Cloud providers have their own cybersecurity solutions, for one. Convincing customers that a carrier can do it better might be tough.Increasingly, the operators have little choice. The likes of Amazon and Google are proactive in creating demand for their products. Their customers then turn to their telecom providers and request the cloud giants’ services. That all but forces them to play along.Consider Google’s new Netflix for games, Stadia. For a subscription fee, starting in November users can access a bevy of titles running on cloud servers rather than their own computers. They’ll be able to play on a computer more than twice as powerful as Sony Corp.’s Playstation 4 console using just a cellphone, which becomes little more than a screen and a controller. And since the data is never exposed to the public internet, carriers’ importance is diminished.A carrier who can boast about Stadia’s performance on its network might use it as a tool to win customers. The best gaming experience will have no perceptible lag, so the closer Stadia’s servers are to the user, the better.Amazon and Microsoft’s gambits, which are called AWS Outposts and Azure Stack respectively, have similar placement goals. While not yet widely available, they comprise server boxes which sit on customers’ premises – factories, oil rigs or offices – and provide a hybrid of local and cloud computing.The race to the edge really does risk turning the network operators into providers of dumb pipes: enterprise customers’ data enter the network via AWS Outpost at one end, and travel to and from centralized servers without being exposed to the public internet, remaining on a private network. It raises carriers’ risk of disintermediation – that they get all but shut out of the most lucrative parts of the cloud business. Stadia is unlikely to eat the world any time soon, and Google is behind rivals Azure and AWS in many enterprise applications, which is where the real money lies. We’re in the very early days of this struggle.But edge computing could turn into something of a Trojan horse for other cloud services. Carriers have a real challenge on their hands.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Huawei’s Troubles Are a Big Opportunity for Ericsson and Nokia
    Bloomberg7 days ago

    Huawei’s Troubles Are a Big Opportunity for Ericsson and Nokia

    (Bloomberg) -- Over the past two decades, China’s Huawei Technologies Co. has come to dominate the global telecom equipment market, winning contracts with a mix of sophisticated technology and attractive prices. Its rise squeezed Europe’s Nokia Oyj and Ericsson AB, which responded by cutting jobs and making acquisitions. Now, with Huawei at the center of a U.S.-China trade war, the tide is turning.Nokia and Ericsson—fierce rivals themselves—have recently wrested notable long-term deals from Huawei to build 5G wireless networks, to enable everything from autonomous cars to robot surgery. Analysts say more could come their way as Huawei grapples with a U.S. export ban and restrictions from other governments concerned that its equipment could enable Chinese espionage.“Huawei will, for the foreseeable future, face a broader cloud of suspicion,” said John Butler, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence in New York. “Nokia and Ericsson are well positioned to benefit.”In May, the European companies both won 5G contracts from SoftBank Group Corp.’s Japanese telecom unit, replacing Huawei and Chinese peer ZTE Corp. Ericsson signed a similar pact in March with Denmark’s biggest phone company, TDC A/S, which had worked with Huawei since 2013 to modernize and manage its network.Other carriers, expecting government curbs on Huawei, have started removing its equipment from sensitive parts of their systems. BT Group Plc is taking Huawei out of its network core, and Vodafone Group Plc has suspended core equipment purchases from Huawei for its European networks. Deutsche Telekom AG, which has Huawei throughout its 4G system, is re-evaluating its purchasing strategy.Nokia and Ericsson are Europe’s final survivors of a merciless winnowing of more than a half-dozen telecom equipment providersAs dozens of phone companies—including those in Canada, Germany and France—plan to choose 5G suppliers in the coming months, Cisco Systems Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co. are also vying for deals. But the key beneficiaries of Huawei’s difficulties are likely to be the two Europeans, which compete directly with the Chinese company in supplying radio-access network equipment.Since last year, the Trump administration has pushed allies to bar Huawei from 5G, citing risks about state spying—allegations the company has denied. The move in May to block Huawei’s access to U.S. suppliers escalated the campaign. The company’s founder, Ren Zhengfei, now predicts the U.S. sanctions will cut its revenue by $30 billion over the coming two years.Outside the U.S., security concerns have led Australia, Japan and Taiwan to bar Huawei from 5G systems. The Chinese company also risks losing meaningful work in Europe and emerging markets where countries could follow with their own limits, according to Bloomberg Intelligence.Publicly, executives from Nokia and Ericsson have been careful not to come off as critical of Huawei. Both manufacture in China and sell gear to Chinese phone carriers, and Nokia has a big research and development presence there. Nokia says it has already been forced to shift some of its supply chain away from China to reduce the impact of tariffs imposed by the Trump administration.QuicktakeHow Huawei Became a Target for GovernmentsInstead of piling on Huawei, the European carriers have trumpeted their 5G successes, each using slightly different metrics. Ericsson claims it has the most publicly announced 5G contracts—21—while Nokia says it has raked in more commercial 5G deals than any other vendor (42). Huawei says it has signed 46 5G contracts. A spokesman for Huawei declined to comment further about its position relative to rivals.Ericsson is “first with 5G,” after building high-speed networks for companies such as AT&T Inc., Swisscom AG in Switzerland and Australia’s Telstra Corp., said Chief Technology Officer Erik Ekudden. “You see that in some markets that we are attracting more customers.”Nokia is winning 5G deals “quite handsomely,” Chief Executive Officer Rajeev Suri told Bloomberg TV on June 10.While Suri said more carriers are likely to swap out Huawei gear in countries that have announced restrictions, the situation is less clear in Europe. “We don’t know yet the impact of specific operator plans,” he said in an interview. “We also don’t know where this geopolitical thing will end up.”Nokia and Ericsson are Europe’s final survivors of a merciless winnowing of more than a half-dozen telecom equipment providers. Bloated costs, a cyclical marketplace, cash-strapped customers, and the relentless rise of Huawei—aided by access to generous Chinese state financing—helped push the likes of Canada’s Nortel Networks Corp. and Germany’s Siemens AG out of the industry.Nokia paid some $2 billion in 2013 to buy Siemens out of a joint venture established to compete against Ericsson and Huawei. Then in 2015, it spent another almost $18 billion acquiring Alcatel-Lucent to broaden its product offering after pushing through more than 25,000 job cuts in the preceding three years. Still, Huawei’s share of the $33 billion of sales in the global mobile infrastructure market surged to 31% in 2018 from 13% in 2010, IHS Markit data show.Huawei, despite its troubles, remains a potent rival. Many phone companies in Europe deem its base stations, switches and routers technologically superior. Fully excluding Huawei and ZTE from 5G would raise radio-access network costs for European phone companies by 40%, or 55 billion euros ($62 billion), the GSMA industry group predicts in an unpublished report seen by Bloomberg. Nokia and Ericsson would have to almost double production to absorb Huawei and ZTE’s business in Europe and could struggle to meet demand, the GSMA report says.Quicktake5G and EspionageBengt Nordstrom, CEO of telecom consultancy Northstream AB, says the situation is perilous for everyone in the industry, as vendors’ budgets could be hit if Huawei faces greater restrictions. “Many component suppliers are already in a tough situation,” Nordstrom said. “They need to spend a lot of money on research, and that means they need access to the entire global market.”For carriers, swapping vendors isn’t as simple as flipping a switch. It takes about two years to plan and implement such a technology shift and install the new equipment, Nordstrom said.Both Nokia and Ericsson are working to make it easier for carriers to switch. Nokia has developed what it calls a “thin layer” of its 4G technology to connect to a new 5G system, allowing a carrier to avoid a wholesale swap of another supplier’s equipment. Ericsson also has a solution to allow a carrier to swap out only a portion of existing infrastructure, and says it can make some areas work side-by-side with Ericsson’s 5G gear.Nokia and Ericsson can agree on one thing: Claims of Huawei’s technological superiority are overblown. They note that they’re involved in the latest networks in the U.S., where carriers are rolling out 5G faster than the Europeans.“We compete quite favorably with Huawei,” Suri said, “with or without the current security concerns.”(Updates to add Nokia and Ericsson production estimate in sixth-last paragraph. An earlier version of the story corrected the ninth paragraph to reflect that Telstra Corp. is an Australian company.)\--With assistance from Caroline Hyde, Kati Pohjanpalo and Angelina Rascouet.To contact the authors of this story: Stefan Nicola in Berlin at snicola2@bloomberg.netNiclas Rolander in Stockholm at nrolander@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, David RocksFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • T-Mobile Doesn't Need Sprint This Bad
    Bloomberg8 days ago

    T-Mobile Doesn't Need Sprint This Bad

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- T-Mobile US Inc. may have found a way to salvage its takeover of Sprint Corp., but it comes at a cost, and leaves one to wonder whether its single-minded focus on sealing the deal is clouding its judgment. It certainly wouldn’t be the first company to let that happen in M&A. T-Mobile is in talks to sell assets, including wireless spectrum and Sprint’s Boost Mobile prepaid brand, to satellite-TV provider and known spectrum-hoarder Dish Network Corp. for at least $6 billion, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. This is being done in an effort to appease the U.S. Department of Justice, which is concerned about the impact that T-Mobile’s $59 billion acquisition of Sprint will have on consumers’ wallets.The DOJ is said to want T-Mobile to lay the foundation for the emergence of a viable No. 4 competitor in the U.S. wireless market to help fill the hole that buying Sprint would leave behind. Dish could, in theory, be that new fourth competitor, and that’s likely the motivation behind the reported arrangement. But given the strategic needs of all involved, the logic of this workaround is puzzling. Let’s start with Dish. While it doesn’t have a wireless network, it already owns lots of mid-band spectrum licenses. These valuable assets have underpinned the company’s $18 billion market capitalization, even as its core satellite-TV business has lost droves of subscribers. Charlie Ergen, the billionaire chairman of Dish, has vaguely laid out plans for using the company’s spectrum to build a nationwide network to service the “internet of things,” ostensibly a step toward later launching a 5G network. Despite what he says, many investors and analysts have expected (or hoped) to see Ergen just sell the spectrum, rather than spending years entangled in a costly network build-out and as a latecomer to the 5G race at that. In any case, the last thing Dish would seem to need is more spectrum. Taking on Boost’s prepaid customers also wouldn’t seem to give Dish much of a leg up in the wireless space, and their bases don’t really overlap. What Dish does need is a partner with the ability to help build its network. If the Sprint deal were to collapse, T-Mobile could be said partner. (After all, Dish has been one of the biggest opponents of the T-Mobile-Sprint merger, at least until now it seems.) Or what about Amazon?A couple of years ago, Ergen reportedly discussed a partnership of sorts with Amazon.com Inc. – and that has to make T-Mobile a little nervous. It’s hard to see how buying Sprint and potentially providing an entry point for Amazon is a better outcome for T-Mobile than the status quo of competing with Sprint, a far weaker rival. Gaining Sprint’s spectrum is also one of the biggest reasons for doing the merger in the first place, so it’s surprising that T-Mobile is willing to divest some of it. And a forced seller isn’t known to get the best price. This is why I wrote last week that it wouldn’t be a surprise if at this point T-Mobile decided to walk away from the deal, on account of disagreeable concessions and a lawsuit by a group of state attorneys general seeking to block the transaction. It may not be a stretch to think that may have been part of the DOJ’s angle in pushing for such divestitures. But if the DOJ and T-Mobile can come to this simple of an agreement – sell spectrum and Boost – then I’m left with two questions: Were regulators really not taking a hard line? Or are executives at T-Mobile and its German parent company, Deutsche Telekom AG, so resolved to get the merger done that they’ll do it even if the merits are spoiled in the process? Craig Moffett, an analyst at MoffettNathanson LLC, put it this way in a note to clients on Monday: “At the end of the day, a bad deal is worse than no deal at all.” That’s true – unless you’re Sprint, in which case no deal is the worst outcome. But T-Mobile shouldn’t feel that same desperation.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals, Berkshire Hathaway Inc., media and telecommunications. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 5G Auction in Germany: Vodafone, Telefonica Buy Spectrum
    Zacks13 days ago

    5G Auction in Germany: Vodafone, Telefonica Buy Spectrum

    After an expensive 5G auction, carriers in Germany are likely to find it increasingly difficult to shell out additional dry powder to upgrade the existing network infrastructure for the nationwide deployment.

  • Is Deutsche Telekom AG (FRA:DTE) A Smart Choice For Dividend Investors?
    Simply Wall St.15 days ago

    Is Deutsche Telekom AG (FRA:DTE) A Smart Choice For Dividend Investors?

    Is Deutsche Telekom AG (FRA:DTE) a good dividend stock? How would you know? Dividend paying companies with growing...

  • TELUS to Invest $150M in Prince George to Boost Connectivity
    Zacks19 days ago

    TELUS to Invest $150M in Prince George to Boost Connectivity

    By investing $150 million in Prince George, TELUS (TU) intends to connect more than 90% of homes and enterprises directly to its leading-edge fiber optic network.

  • Reuters19 days ago

    UPDATE 1-IBM, T-Systems scrap mainframe venture after German criticism

    IBM has withdrawn an application for anti-trust approval for a mainframe computing venture with T-Systems, the IT services arm of Deutsche Telekom , after the German cartel office made a critical initial assessment of the plan. Pulling the deal marks a setback for T-Systems CEO Adel Al-Saleh, who since being hired at he start of 2018 has reduced staff, closed offices and sought to hive off business lines that are not expected to generate profitable growth. "According to our preliminary assessment IBM holds a dominant position here in the European Economic Area which would have been further strengthened by acquiring personnel and essential infrastructure from its competitor, T-Systems," said Cartel Office chief Andreas Mundt in a statement on Friday.

  • Frontier Communications to Sell Operations in Four States
    Zacks27 days ago

    Frontier Communications to Sell Operations in Four States

    The sale proceeds are likely to be utilized to pay off Frontier Communications' (FTR) financial obligations, while strengthening its liquidity position.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: L'Or??al, Kering, TOTAL, Deutsche Telekom and Davide
    Zacks28 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: L'Or??al, Kering, TOTAL, Deutsche Telekom and Davide

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: L'Or??al, Kering, TOTAL, Deutsche Telekom and Davide

  • 5 Stocks to Buy on European Parliament Election Results
    Zacks29 days ago

    5 Stocks to Buy on European Parliament Election Results

    European stocks get a lift after EU parliamentary election results show more support for pro-EU, business-friendly centrists.

  • Reuterslast month

    Bids in Germany's 5G auction already top 6 billion euros

    Germany's auction of frequencies for fifth-generation mobile services, now into its 10th week, has drawn 6 billion euros (£5.2 billion) in bids so far. Market leader Deutsche Telekom has complained that the regulator has forced up prices by offering too little spectrum. Deutsche Telekom leads in 13 of the blocks, with competitor Vodafone ahead in 12 and Telefonica Deutschland in eight, according to auction results https://www.bundesnetzagentur.de/DE/Sachgebiete/Telekommunikation/Unternehmen_Institutionen/Frequenzen/OeffentlicheNetze/Mobilfunknetze/mobilfunknetze-node.html published by the Federal Network Agency (BNetzA).

  • TELUS to Invest $53M in Greater Montreal Networks This Year
    Zackslast month

    TELUS to Invest $53M in Greater Montreal Networks This Year

    TELUS' (TU) network investments are likely to help Montreal to become one of the smartest cities in Canada, while paving the way for the impending 5G technology across the region.

  • Barrons.comlast month

    Sprint’s Merger With T-Mobile Is Good for AT&T and Verizon Stock. Here’s Why.

    Many investors assumed that federal antitrust regulators wouldn’t let the wireless market shrink to three major players from four. But the latest news from the FCC indicates otherwise.

  • Reuterslast month

    Deutsche Telekom declines comment on Huawei reports; vendor review continues

    FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Deutsche Telekom declined to comment on reports that some Western companies were reducing their exposure to Huawei after the Chinese company was blacklisted in Washington, but said ...

  • Vodafone & Telecom Italia to Merge Telecom Towers in Italy
    Zackslast month

    Vodafone & Telecom Italia to Merge Telecom Towers in Italy

    Vodafone (VOD) and Telecom Italia (TI) intends to unite their 22,000 telecom towers in Italy under a single operation, to reduce debt and enhance productivity.