DTEGY - Deutsche Telekom AG

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
16.76
+0.01 (+0.07%)
At close: 3:48PM EDT
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Previous Close16.75
Open16.68
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range16.68 - 16.81
52 Week Range15.81 - 17.95
Volume69,856
Avg. Volume148,581
Market Cap80.443B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.11
PE Ratio (TTM)17.35
EPS (TTM)0.97
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.78 (4.68%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-03-29
1y Target Est20.03
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Deutsche Telekom to take on telecom ops from slimmed-down T-Systems
    Reuters

    Deutsche Telekom to take on telecom ops from slimmed-down T-Systems

    Deutsche Telekom is taking back responsibility for corporate telecoms clients from its restructured T-Systems unit, which will emerge as a slimmed-down operation focused on IT and digital services. Adel Al-Saleh, hired at the start of 2018 to staunch losses at T-Systems, told staff on Wednesday that the business would in future be "an integrated end-to-end IT player and reliable enabler for our clients' digitization". American Al-Saleh, who gave himself two years https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-deutsche-telekom-restructuring/new-ceo-of-deutsche-telekoms-it-arm-gives-himself-1-2-years-for-turnaround-idUKKCN1GS1S6 to get the job done, has already acted to reduce T-Systems' German headcount by 5,600, close most local offices and hire 3,000 offshore staff to round out its software skills.

  • T-Mobile and Sprint Merger Could Lead to Job Losses
    Market Realist

    T-Mobile and Sprint Merger Could Lead to Job Losses

    T-Mobile's (TMUS) retail employees and technicians want assurance that the proposed merger with Sprint (S) won't result in job losses.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Deutsche Telekom 5G network goes live in 5 German cities

    Deutsche Telekom said on Thursday its 5G mobile network had gone live in five German cities, timing the launch for maximum impact on the opening day of the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin. The German market leader paid 2.2 billion euros ($2.5 billion) for 5G spectrum at a recent auction and the regulator has just unlocked access to the 3.6 Gigahertz band that will power its initial 5G offering. Berlin, Munich, Cologne, Bonn and Darmstadt now offer local 5G services with bandwidth of up to 1 gigabit per second - fast enough to download a movie onto a smartphone in a few seconds.

  • T-Mobile US workers worry Sprint deal will mean job losses
    Reuters

    T-Mobile US workers worry Sprint deal will mean job losses

    T-Mobile US retail employees and technicians delivered a letter late Tuesday for Deutsche Telekom CEO Tim Hoettges, seeking assurances that their jobs and paychecks will be safe if the wireless carrier is allowed to merge with Sprint, its smaller rival. T-Mobile Workers United, with about 500 members and backed by the Communications Workers of America and the German union ver.di, urged Hoettges to "make solid and verifiable" assurances that jobs will be safe, paychecks will not shrink and management will not interfere in union activities. Deutsche Telekom, which owns 63% of T-Mobile, did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

  • Benzinga

    What Some Of The Largest Companies On OTC Markets Said In Their Most Recent Earnings Reports

    For the sake of brevity—there are over 10,000 securities that trade on OTC Markets—we narrowed down our search to a few of the largest companies based on market cap on the OTCQX Best Market (all performance data is as of the August 28 close). The earnings growth was led by strong sales of multiple sclerosis drug Ocrevus, hemophilia drug Hemlibra, and cancer drugs Tecentriq, Perjeta and Avastin. More importantly, the company raised its sales growth guidance from the low-to-mid single-digit range to the mid-to-high single-digit range and announced they expect to raise their dividend.

  • Ericsson, Deutsche Telekom team up for industrial 5G services in Germany
    Reuters

    Ericsson, Deutsche Telekom team up for industrial 5G services in Germany

    Ericsson and Deutsche Telekom will team up to tap rising demand for mobile technology at industrial sites in Germany, as communications providers seek local uses for 5G with national deployment still years away. Next generation 5G technology, which can provide data speeds at least 20 times faster than 4G, will underpin the great advances of the next era, from self-driving cars and augmented reality to smart cities and artificial intelligence. Ericsson, which competes with Finland's Nokia and China's Huawei to build mobile data infrastructure worldwide, said that its so-called Campus networks would combine public and private mobile connectivity.

  • Power-Hungry Phone Companies Dial Into Surging Green Bond Market
    Bloomberg

    Power-Hungry Phone Companies Dial Into Surging Green Bond Market

    (Bloomberg) -- Phone carriers are huge energy users, and need to cut emissions. They also face massive bills to build out the next generation of wireless networks. Green bonds promise to help them with both.A steady flow of issuance could be building: Orange SA and BT Group Plc are poised to follow Telefonica SA and Verizon Communications Inc. in selling securities designed to fund environmentally friendly projects. The industry has already completed at least $3 billion of sales since January, its first steps into a sustainable debt market that Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates could exceed $370 billion this year.The proceeds can help telecom companies replace power-hungry copper wires with fiber-optic cables, or build the 5G networks that promise to make cities, homes and factories more efficient. There’s plenty of investor appetite for this new take on sustainable investing, but there’s a catch: any hint that a bond doesn’t genuinely help the planet can cause some buyers to flee.“Telecoms have to invest a lot. In the long run, having green bonds in place is going to be very important,’’ said Juuso Rantala, who holds Telefonica’s green bond in the 400 million-euro ($449 million) fund he manages at Aktia Asset Management Ltd. in Finland. “If I find out that I cannot trust the company in the case of green bonds, I cannot trust them in many other ways too. If I cannot trust them, I don’t invest.’’The securities show how green debt is expanding beyond its original universe of the clean energy industry. Beef supplier Marfrig Global Foods SA and Australian retailer Woolworths Group Ltd. have tapped this market to help their operations become more environmentally friendly.For carriers, the task is urgent. The communications industry accounts for about 10% of global electricity demand, and that could exceed 20% by 2030 as demand for data balloons, according to Huawei Technologies Co.Telecom companies have ways to clean up their act. For example, replacing copper with glass wires would use 85% less energy, according to Telefonica. And 5G can enable a range of environmental benefits by allowing smart buildings to monitor heating, connected warehouses to optimize their logistics and power grids to better allocate electricity.But these companies are already staggering under a mountain of debt from, among other things, buying 5G licenses. They’ll need to make sure they can keep their borrowing costs low and tap investors when needed.That’s where green bonds can help: the interest costs are about the same as on these companies’ conventional securities, but they offer the opportunity to access a wider pool of investors.The share of funds focused on socially responsible investing, which includes environmental projects, has risen 34% over the last two years, and now accounts for $30.7 trillion of assets globally, according to the investor group Global Sustainable Investment Alliance.“Many more green telco bonds are likely,” Morgan Stanley analysts led by Emmet Kelly wrote in June. “Demand from funds that have incorporated sustainability into their investment framework has been key.’’Telefonica, based in Madrid, is a good example. Demand for the issue, which priced in January, was significant: the company received five times the orders than what was available for sale, and obtained a spread more than the mid-swap rate that was about 25 basis points lower than initial indications.The yield on the 1 billion-euro 5-year security is in line with the rest of its curve, Bloomberg data show, indicating it didn’t have to pay a premium to tap demand for sustainable credit. It’s a similar story for Verizon and Vodafone Group Plc.Orange and BT Group are paying attention -- they have inserted clauses into their Eurobond prospectuses which would let them issue green bonds in the near future. And Deutsche Telekom AG is monitoring the surging market closely, said a spokesman.For investors, the risks go beyond what’s expected for any fixed-income asset. Buyers also have consider just how green these bonds are.“The question is whether or not a bond offers a real energy efficiency gain or overall gain for the environment,’’ said Arnaud-Guilhem Lamy, who holds telecom securities in his 340 million-euro ($381 million) green bond fund at BNP Paribas Asset Management in Paris. “If we think it’s insufficient, we would sell.’’For a start, there’s always the possibility that this new breed of green-bond borrowers divert proceeds to inappropriate purposes, including pooling them into general funds. Though monitoring groups such as credit rating firms can discourage such behavior, it’s something investors need to watch.But 5G presents a particular environmental paradox.Internet-of-things technologies will connect billions more devices and require many more antennas, so 5G will initially use more power than 4G, according to Sustainalytics, an independent corporate sustainability research firm. This complicates the idea that 5G can be a green investment.However, Sustainalytics estimates the energy savings from 5G outweigh the extra emissions to deploy the new tech by a ratio of 5 to 1. The firm’s analysis of the Verizon bond issue, which included 5G deployment among the potential use of proceeds, found that it was a credible candidate for green financing.It’s a good thing, because Verizon plans on returning to this corner of the bond market. It looks like it will be welcome, too – its $1 billion issue of 10-year green debt was eight times oversubscribed within six hours of being offered for sale, said Jim Gowen, head of supply chain and sustainability for the U.S. carrier.“It was far beyond our wildest expectations,” Gowen said. “We are very interested in doing another one.’’\--With assistance from Paul Cohen and Lyubov Pronina.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Jennifer RyanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Deutsche Telekom confident U.S. merger will still deliver cost savings
    Reuters

    Deutsche Telekom confident U.S. merger will still deliver cost savings

    Deutsche Telekom said on Thursday it still expects the merger of its U.S. unit T-Mobile with Sprint to generate $43 billion in cost savings even after tweaking the deal to secure antitrust clearance. The U.S. Department of Justice approved the deal, which was struck more than a year ago, after T-Mobile agreed to sell Sprint's prepaid business to satellite TV firm Dish Network Corp to create a fourth U.S. wireless carrier. The merger of the No.3 and No.4 U.S. mobile players would create a business accounting for more than three fifths of group revenue at Deutsche Telekom, which is the leader in its home market and has a broad European presence.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Deutsche Telekom confident U.S. merger will still deliver cost savings

    Deutsche Telekom said on Thursday it still expects the merger of its U.S. unit T-Mobile with Sprint to generate $43 billion in cost savings even after tweaking the deal to secure antitrust clearance. The U.S. Department of Justice approved the deal, which was struck more than a year ago, after T-Mobile agreed to sell Sprint's prepaid business to satellite TV firm Dish Network Corp to create a fourth U.S. wireless carrier.

  • Three High Forward Dividend-Yield Stocks
    GuruFocus.com

    Three High Forward Dividend-Yield Stocks

    Deutsche Telekom AG tops the list Continue reading...

  • Reuters

    Two German fibre groups for sale; buyer could combine them -sources

    Two German fibre-optic networks operators are coming up for sale, presenting an opportunity for a potential buyer to create a sizeable player in a fragmented market where Deutsche Telekom dominates, sources close to the matter said. Inexio, 59%-owned by buyout group Warburg Pincus, is expected to launch a sale in the second half of the year that could value it at more than 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion), the sources said. Rival Deutsche Glasfaser, majority-owned by private equity investor KKR, is also preparing a sale which may start in late 2019 or early 2020, they added.

  • Moody's

    Dish Network Corporation -- Moody's places DISH Network's and DISH DBS's ratings on review for downgrade

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") placed DISH Network Corporation's (DISH) Ba3 Corporate Family Rating (CFR), Ba2-PD Probability of Default Rating (PDR) rating, and Ba3 senior unsecured rating, as well as its wholly-owned subsidiary DISH DBS Corporation's (DISH DBS) B1 CFR, Ba3-PD PDR, and B1 senior unsecured rating on review for downgrade. DISH Network's SGL-2 speculative grade liquidity (SGL) rating is unchanged.

  • Moody's

    T-Mobile USA, Inc. -- Moody's says DOJ approval of T-Mobile's merger with Sprint has no ratings impact; lawsuit by 13 state AGs remains primary hurdle

    Moody's Investors Service says the ratings of T-Mobile USA, Inc. (T-Mobile, Ba2 stable) and Sprint Corporation (Sprint, B2 review for upgrade) remain unchanged following the filing today of a proposed settlement by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Attorneys General for five states that addresses the anticompetitive concerns of the DOJ's Antitrust Division regarding the proposed merger between T-Mobile US, Inc. (T-Mobile US), the parent of T-Mobile, and Sprint. While this proposed settlement still needs to be approved by the US District Court for the District of Columbia, a primary hurdle for the merger's close remains in the form of litigation by 13 state Attorneys General and the District of Columbia (state AGs group).

  • T-Mobile and Sprint Are Almost One. Hooray?
    Bloomberg

    T-Mobile and Sprint Are Almost One. Hooray?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The government body that long posed the biggest obstacle to the union of T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp. because of the deal’s glaring antitrust issues has now given its blessing. On Friday, the U.S. Department of Justice approved the controversial $59 billion merger, capping a rather unconventional regulatory review process with a decision that will utterly transform the U.S. wireless market.The deal may alter how wireless-plan prices are set in the industry, where Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Inc. are currently the only other national carriers. As part of the flimsy concessions meant to offset the negative effects, T-Mobile agreed to sell Sprint’s Boost and Virgin pay-as-you-go wireless businesses and some airwaves to Dish Network Corp., a satellite-TV company. Makan Delrahim, the DOJ’s top antitrust enforcer, is seeking to synthetically create a new fourth competitor through Dish, which will have access to T-Mobile’s wireless network for seven years while it builds its own. But Dish is inexperienced in this business, so it has a long way to go and much work to do before it can disrupt the market the same way that competition between T-Mobile and Sprint has for the last few years.In an earlier agreement with Ajit Pai, chair of the Federal Communications Commission, T-Mobile pledged to hold off on price increases, but only for three years, by which point it promises to cover 97% of the population with 5G service. Backing a deal that was once seen as off-limits, the federal government broadly has taken the stance that the merger is essential for U.S. companies to lead the world in launching faster 5G data networks, though it’s not entirely clear why.There’s irony in the fact that amid all the chest-thumping about U.S. technological dominance, the biggest beneficiary of the DOJ’s decision is a billionaire from Japan named Masayoshi Son. His company, SoftBank Group Corp., controls the downtrodden Overland Park, Kansas-based Sprint, which has largely been a disappointing investment for Son. Sprint, strained by debt and a run-down brand, now gets to join a superior operator on healthier footing – and Son gets a piece of it. SoftBank is retaining 27% economic ownership of the combined entity, while T-Mobile’s German parent, Deutsche Telekom AG, will own 42%. Shares of their rivals, Verizon and AT&T, extended gains after the DOJ announcement.It’s not a done deal yet. Attorneys general from 13 states and the District of Columbia have sued to block the merger; should they proceed, they may have a strong case. However, Delrahim is reportedly trying to negotiate with state officials.Still, the DOJ appears to be contradicting itself. Just three days ago, Delrahim’s antitrust division announced a broad review of the U.S. technology giants, such as Facebook Inc. and Google, to look into whether they possess too much power and cause consumer harm. Backing a deal that similarly has the potential to hurt consumers is inconsistent with his concerns about tech overreach. The appearance of a double standard doesn’t help to suppress speculation that political forces may be at play.Questions have been raised about White House interference, just as they were during last year’s trial over AT&T’s takeover of Time Warner, in which the DOJ failed in its effort to block the deal. While some 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls have come out against the Sprint takeover, arguing it would hurt lower-income consumers and Americans in rural areas, President Donald Trump has signaled support by emphasizing the need to be globally competitive in 5G and facilitate such investments: The FCC also became fiercely divided along party lines. Pai, a Republican, broke with tradition by voicing his support for the transaction in May, before his own agency colleagues and counterparts at the DOJ had the chance to complete their analyses. Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, expressed her displeasure with how this was handled, saying it “looks like some backroom dealing.”The country’s 5G push isn’t based on fantasy or a ruse, but it’s not clear how enabling T-Mobile and Sprint to combine their 5G capabilities abates the antitrust issues. On the one hand, T-Mobile will gain Sprint’s desirable mid-band spectrum, which can carry data at fast speeds and still travel long distances and through buildings. That makes it practical for connecting rural areas, as the companies promise to help close the country’s digital divide. After all, there’s a connection between income inequality and a lack of affordable access to wireless connectivity, which has become part of our social fabric.But while addressing that problem is certainly a mission to support, skepticism is warranted when any megamerger promises better service and better prices as a result. Just look at the airline industry: Consolidation has left the carriers with little incentive to compete on price or labor, improve the experience for customers or try to earn their trust (and in the case of wireless companies, part of that trust is with our personal data, and it’s been broken before).As for the notion that Dish is going to maintain the competitive balance, if that were true there’d be little reason for T-Mobile to do the deal as it likely seeks to close the gap with its larger rivals and earn margins more on par with theirs. Dish hasn’t even proven a reliable narrator in its own story yet, given that Chairman Charlie Ergen’s wireless talk has mostly been just that. It will take time for Dish to become widely known as another option for wireless service, never mind the costly, time-consuming process of actually building a network.T-Mobile and Sprint have been important competitive and innovative forces in the wireless market. We’ll know in due time whether regulators erred in not trying harder to preserve that.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals, Berkshire Hathaway Inc., media and telecommunications. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Napping Spanish Dealmaker Nears The End of Its Siesta
    Bloomberg

    Napping Spanish Dealmaker Nears The End of Its Siesta

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Is Telefonica SA ready to return to its acquisitive ways? Almost.Since Jose Maria Alvarez-Pallete was promoted from operations chief to the joint chief executive and chairman role in 2016, the focus at Spain’s former national carrier has been debt reduction. And quite rightly, too – he inherited one of the biggest debt piles in Europe.He has sold businesses in Latin America, stakes in the cell towers unit, and other businesses not considered central, raising at least 2.5 billion euros ($2.8 billion), according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Operating income before depreciation and amortization, the company’s preferred earnings measure, hit 8.7 billion euros in the first six months of this year, up 12% from three years ago. Net debt has fallen below 40 billion euros for the first time in more than a decade.But historically Telefonica has been a voracious acquirer. In the decade before Alvarez-Pallete took the reins, it spent some 26 billion euros investing in operators from Brazil to Italy. And that excludes its majority-owned subsidiary Telefonica Deutschland AG’s 8.6-billion-euro acquisition of KPN NV’s German operations in 2013.While acquisitions on that sort of scale would still ask a lot from investors, there’s the possibility of some smaller deals. Changes in the telecoms landscape have made Telefonica’s debt pile more acceptable: the trajectory of its biggest rivals mean it looks a lot more frugal.That’s because the dealmaking of two other European telecoms giants, Vodafone Group Plc and Deutsche Telekom AG, has stretched their debt exposure to levels similar to those of Telefonica. Vodafone is awaiting the completion of its 18.4 billion-euro acquisition of Liberty Global Plc’s German and Eastern European operations, while Deutsche Telekom is hoping its U.S. unit’s $57.8 billion deal for Sprint Corp. secures regulatory approval soon.Although the Spanish firm hasn’t yet reported its net debt ratios according to the most recent accounting standards, it’s likely to be somewhere close to 2.8 times Ebitda. That’s below Vodafone’s 2.9 times, and similar to the level around which Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Aidan Cheslin expects Deutsche Telekom to land following the Sprint takeover. And Telefonica’s capital costs are less  than Vodafone’s. Assuming that the Spanish firm’s debt pile continues to shrink as we head towards 2020, it could feasibly start looking at deals in adjacent markets where it would be easy to execute operational synergies. Investment bankers would also love a tie-up with Liberty’s U.K. cable business, Virgin Media, but it’s hard to see how Telefonica could be the consolidator in such a deal without some very creative financing. Portugal’s NOS SGPS S.A., with a market capitalization of some 3 billion euros, might be more in the realms of possibility.For his part, Alvarez-Pallete seemed to indicate that Telefonica is ready to end the era of divestments. The firm no longer needs to sell businesses solely to reduce its debt pile, he intimated to analysts in a conference call on Thursday. Perhaps he's ready to return to the consolidator role.The company probably isn’t there just yet. But it’s likely to have the firepower in the not too distant future if it maintains the current path.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Zacks

    T-Mobile & Sprint Merger Nears Approval, Dish to Buy Assets

    T-Mobile (TMUS) and Sprint (S) get a step closer in securing the Justice Department's approval for their $26.5 billion proposed merger, as Dish agrees to pay $5 billion for wireless assets.

  • Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets
    Bloomberg

    Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets

    (Bloomberg) -- Satellite-TV provider Dish Network Corp. has agreed to pay $5 billion for wireless assets in a deal with T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp., setting the stage for the Justice Department to approve the $26.5 billion merger of the mobile-phone carriers, according to people familiar with the matter.After weeks of negotiations, the parties have hammered out an agreement under which Dish will pay about $1.5 billion for prepaid mobile businesses and roughly $3.5 billion for spectrum, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the details are still private. Under the terms of the deal, Dish can’t sell the assets or hand over control of the agreement to a third party for three years, the people said.The accord should allow the Justice Department to sign off on T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint as soon as Thursday. T-Mobile also is expected to reiterate that the economic terms of the Sprint deal, which it said would generate about $43 billion in savings, won’t be affected by the asset sale to Dish, the people said.Representatives for Dish, T-Mobile, Sprint and the Justice Department declined to comment.Sprint shares jumped as much as 7.2% in New York trading Wednesday and T-Mobile gained as much as 1.9%. Dish slipped as much as 2.3%.Shares of SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese owner of Sprint, rose as much as 3.3% after Bloomberg reported on the Dish deal. T-Mobile is backed by Deutsche Telekom AG, which rose less than 1% in Frankfurt.T-Mobile and Sprint -- and their overseas parent companies -- have spent more than a year fighting to get their merger approved. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai recommended in May that his agency clear the deal, but the Justice Department has been harder to win over.As part of the Dish agreement, the satellite-TV company gets a seven-year wholesale agreement allowing it to sell T-Mobile wireless service under the Dish brand. The package also includes a three-year service agreement from T-Mobile to provide operational support as prepaid customers shift to Dish.Fourth CarrierThe Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, has pushed for an agreement that would be a win for consumers and compensate for the fact that T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint would reduce the number of major players in the wireless industry to three from four.Dish’s role would satisfy the government’s longstanding demand that there be four national mobile-service companies remaining, even after the merger of the third- and fourth-ranked carriers in the market.Critics have noted that the track record for competitors created by divestitures has been dismal. French communications firm Iliad SA became Italy’s fourth carrier last year after buying assets divested by two larger rivals that merged. Iliad had an initial surge in subscriber growth, followed by a slowdown.Even if T-Mobile and Sprint secure the Justice Department’s blessing, they face resistance from a group of state attorneys general. They say the deal should be blocked because it will hinder competition and raise prices.(Updates with shares in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nabila Ahmed in New York at nahmed54@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Nick TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Deutsche Telekom sets meeting as T-Mobile, Sprint deal nears approval: report
    Reuters

    Deutsche Telekom sets meeting as T-Mobile, Sprint deal nears approval: report

    Deutsche Telekom has called a leadership meeting on Wednesday in expectation of U.S. regulatory approval of the proposed merger of its U.S. T-Mobile unit with rival Sprint, according to business daily Handelsblatt. A meeting to update Deutsche Telekom's supervisory board on U.S. strategy has been scheduled for 10:15 am (0815 GMT), Handelsblatt reported. It cited unnamed sources as saying that officials at the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) were expected to give the nod to the $26 billion deal after months of negotiations to address antitrust concerns arising from the deal.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Deutsche Telekom sets meeting as T-Mobile, Sprint deal nears approval-report

    Deutsche Telekom has called a leadership meeting on Wednesday in expectation of U.S. regulatory approval of the proposed merger of its U.S. T-Mobile unit with rival Sprint, according to business daily Handelsblatt. A meeting to update Deutsche Telekom's supervisory board on U.S. strategy has been scheduled for 10:15 am (0815 GMT), Handelsblatt reported. It cited unnamed sources as saying that officials at the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) were expected to give the nod to the $26 billion deal after months of negotiations to address antitrust concerns arising from the deal.

  • T-Mobile-Sprint Deal With Department of Justice May Be Stalling
    Motley Fool

    T-Mobile-Sprint Deal With Department of Justice May Be Stalling

    T-Mobile's parent company doesn't want to enable a potential competitor.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-U.S. Justice Department may sue to block Sprint, T-Mobile merger -source

    The U.S. Justice Department has told T-Mobile US Inc and Sprint Corp to wrap up a deal by the end of next week to sell assets that are to be divested as a condition of their proposed merger or face a lawsuit aimed at stopping the transaction, a source familiar with the deal said on Thursday. T-Mobile and Sprint did not immediately respond to Reuters' requests for comment. The Justice Department declined to comment.