EADSY - Airbus SE

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
29.72
-1.27 (-4.10%)
At close: 3:59PM EST
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Previous Close30.99
Open29.71
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range28.93 - 29.99
52 Week Range28.93 - 38.45
Volume1,718,324
Avg. Volume205,895
Market Cap93.859B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.15
PE Ratio (TTM)27.14
EPS (TTM)1.10
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.47 (1.50%)
Ex-Dividend DateApr 10, 2019
1y Target EstN/A
  • ACCESSWIRE

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Investigates Claims On Behalf of Investors of Airbus SE - EADSY; EADSF

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / February 28, 2020 / Pomerantz LLP is investigating claims on behalf of investors of Airbus SE ("Airbus" or the "Company") (OTCPINK:EADSY) (OTCPINK:EADSF). ...

  • Malaysia's AirAsia X defers A330neo deliveries as virus pressures frail finances
    Reuters

    Malaysia's AirAsia X defers A330neo deliveries as virus pressures frail finances

    KUALA LUMPUR/SYDNEY (Reuters) - Malaysian long-haul budget airline AirAsia X said it will defer delivery of 78 Airbus SE A330neo planes and consider other changes to reduce its fleet, as the coronavirus outbreak adds pressure on the loss-making carrier. AirAsia X said late on Thursday it might sell two A330s that could fetch up to $100 million and return five others to lessors early, adding it was already in negotiations with lessors about a targeted 30% cut in lease rates. AirAsia X flagged lower forward bookings and pressure on fares in the presentation.

  • Ice Cream and Thai Curries Are About to Fly Through Irish Skies
    Bloomberg

    Ice Cream and Thai Curries Are About to Fly Through Irish Skies

    (Bloomberg) -- In the suburbs of Dublin on a windy, overcast day in January, several alumni of Airbus and the U.K.’s Royal Air Force watched as a flying object, shaped a bit like a crouching frog, hovered about 10 meters (33 feet) up in the air.The craft, called MNA-1090, opened its cargo bay door, and lowered a package — about the size of a shoebox — to the ground on a string. The robotics engineers who’d helped design the vehicle opened the carton, looked inside, and smiled: the dozen-or-so pots of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream were still perfectly frozen.In late March, customers on the outskirts of Dublin, far from the dense metropolises that make services like Uber Eats and Deliveroo viable in terms of revenue, will get to try ordering food and drink the same way. Manna.aero built the MNA-1090 drone to be an airborne replacement for the human-and-bicycle formula used the world over by food-delivery apps, and is preparing to run a couple of hundred test flights per day over several weeks to lay the groundwork for a permanent service for small Irish towns. Ben & Jerry’s, U.K. food delivery firm Just Eat Plc, and local Irish restaurant chain Camile Thai are signed up to participate in the pilot that will take place at the University College Dublin campus.“In five years, it’s going to be the most normal thing you can imagine,” Manna Chief Executive Officer Bobby Healy says.If you live in a city, having a hot meal delivered to your doorstep in under an hour has never been easier or cheaper. For about the price of a small coffee, a human being will cycle to a restaurant, collect your freshly baked pizza and bring it to your apartment. Innovations in smartphones, mapping and gig-economy logistics have catalyzed growth of the sector, which research firm Frost & Sullivan estimates will be worth $200 billion by 2025.But the margins are tiny for the companies handling the delivery, and the competition fierce. In October, Grubhub Inc. executives told shareholders they didn’t believe it was even possible to generate significant profit from food delivery. The cost of paying people to drive food around was just too much, they said.Companies are looking for an alternative, and a roster of investors believe Healy might have a model that could work: a drones-as-a-service for restaurants and delivery apps.Here’s how Healy said it will work: Manna will partner with restaurants or food courts that have a high-throughput of orders and a small outdoor space to house a drone-loading team. The Manna craft itself is about the size of a computer printer and will carry meals weighing around 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds) more than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in under three minutes, even in wind and rain.Upon arriving at its destination, the drone will hover and wait for the customer to accept delivery using an app, having indicated when ordering exactly where they want their food to land — on the lawn, an outdoor dining table or just in the driveway. The drone will descend and lower the food parcel that, Healy said, will still be “piping hot.”Manna’s vehicle has been designed to travel for 100 million hours without a problem, Healy said in an interview. But, alongside space for three 10-inch pizzas, it also has a backup battery and two parachutes, just in case.The 51-year-old Irish entrepreneur is a mobility veteran: In 2003, he sold off travel software firm Eland Technologies to industry titan Sita.Aero. He then helped build CarTrawler into a transportation platform used by more than 100 international airlines. Healy’s got some well-known names putting $5.2 million behind Manna, including billionaire Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund, Dynamo venture capital, and FFVC, among others.For food platforms, Manna says the service is more than just a gimmick — it will lower delivery costs and allow them to scale to currently under-served suburban areas in a profitable way. Healy said Manna’s drone delivery will cost platforms $3 to $5 per delivery.Fabricio Bloisi, CEO of online delivery platform iFood in Brazil, said the use of drones is a “great breakthrough” for the industry because of their efficiency and ability to travel relatively large distances. He said his company’s working with Sao Paulo-based Speedbird to reduce delivery time by combining the use of drones with bicycles and motorbikes.Uber’s testing a drone for food delivery in the San Diego area, and Alphabet Inc.’s Wing is already delivering coffee, food, medicine and household items directly to homes in Finland, Australia and the U.S. state of Virginia.Amazon.com Inc.’s also developing its Prime Air service, with a view to delivering parcels, not necessarily food, of up to five pounds via drone. The company’s bidding for a stake in the U.K.’s Deliveroo.Healy isn’t worried. He’s pitching Manna as a business-to-business company, where its drones are used by food delivery companies, not end consumers. To the entrepreneur, Wing isn’t his rival. “We’re arming their competitors.”Still, not everyone is so rosy about the drone delivery trend. In a sign of how divided views are on the technology, Dutch food delivery firm Takeaway.com NV — which recently bought Just Eat, one of Manna’s partners for the March pilot — said it thinks drone delivery for food is a “fantasy.”“We just don’t see any way how it can work currently from a technical perspective,” said Joris Wilton, a spokesman for Takeaway. “We will not be investing in developing it in-house.”Miki Kuusi, co-founder and CEO of Helsinki-based food delivery company Wolt, said his company has tested drone deliveries, but, “it’s been more PR than actually about a business case.”That partly has to do with complexities around picking up the food orders, he said. Drone services have to be deeply integrated with the restaurants to ensure that drones are loaded in the right way, something “most restaurants in a hectic environment are not equipped to do.”Then there’s the tricky issue of regulation. Airspace authorities have tightened restrictions on drone usage as their popularity with consumers and troublemakers has grown. People also express discomfort at the idea of machinery whizzing above their homes — both for privacy and safety reasons. Add to that the complexity of hauling hot food in the sky over several kilometres and it’s an uphill battle for any startup to launch a service.Healy recognizes that changing the industry won’t come overnight, given the need to safely test the technology, get approvals from regulators at each new stage as well as from the local communities.Still, he expects to have completed between 20,0000 and 50,000 successful deliveries by year-end.“With this industry it’s ‘crawl, walk, run,’” Healy said, “and we want to crawl for a little while, we want everyone to feel good about it.” To contact the author of this story: Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Nate Lanxon at nlanxon@bloomberg.net, Amy ThomsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • A Slimmer Nokia Might Better Compete With Huawei
    Bloomberg

    A Slimmer Nokia Might Better Compete With Huawei

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The prospect is tantalizing: the Boeing Co. versus Airbus SE battle, but for the 5G era.Nokia Oyj, the Finnish telecommunications equipment firm, is contemplating asset sales and merger options, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday. That raises the prospect of joining forces with Swedish rival Ericsson AB, thereby creating a European behemoth to compete more effectively with China’s Huawei Technologies Co.A tie-up would echo Europe’s cobbling together of Airbus in the 1960s and 1970s as a rival to U.S. aircraft-making giants like Boeing, setting up a fiercely contested duopoly that has dominated global aviation ever since. Unfortunately, it would also be a strategic misstep. Asset sales are the far more sensible option.Merging the two Nordic companies would most likely create as many problems as it would solve. Nokia has endured a tumultuous 12 months — the shares fell 25% in October after cutting its outlook — in part because of the failure to effectively integrate its last major acquisition, the $18 billion takeover of Alcatel-Lucent SA.Combining with Ericsson would make it easier to compete on price with Huawei, which benefits from the economies of scale afforded by the massive Chinese market, but it could also require several years just to secure regulatory approval, let alone integrate the operations. That would be a boon to Huawei, which could capitalize on the period of uncertainty to secure new customers.Crucially, Finland, which is one of Nokia’s five-biggest shareholders through its Solidium Oy investment vehicle, would surely stand in the way of any merger that would eliminate a lot of jobs.An acquisition by Cisco Systems Inc. would satisfy President Donald Trump’s exhortations for the U.S. to build a giant in fifth-generation wireless technology, pairing the San Jose, California-based company’s core network savvy with Nokia’s expertise in wireless communications. But it would be foolish of Cisco to tap its sizable cash pile for a deal that would dilute its margins; it enjoyed net profit representing 24% of sales last year, compared with Nokia’s 2.1%.QuicktakeHow Huawei Landed at the Center of Global Tech TussleNokia’s substandard 5G offering means Chief Executive Officer Rajeev Suri has been unable to profit on the tribulations of Huawei, and its shares have lost a third of their value over the past year. That downturn in fortunes makes it vulnerable to an approach from an activist investor scrutinizing businesses that are undervalued as part of the whole.Nokia can get ahead of that threat by putting some assets on the chopping block. Its intellectual property arm would seem the prime candidate: the division still generates healthy profits — it has a 98% gross profit margin on sales of 1.5 billion euros ($1.6 billion) — but the value of the portfolio is deteriorating steadily. Nokia could sell much of it for a lucrative sum — those parts pertaining to its old handset business, for example — while retaining the most recent patents developed for 5G. The fixed-access business, which has endured the steepest sales drop-off, might also be a candidate, according to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst John Butler.The review of options may yet come to nothing, as my Bloomberg News colleagues reported. But the last thing Suri needs is the unhelpful distraction of an activist calling for changes as he plays catch-up in 5G. It would be far better to be proactive himself.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Peter Thiel’s Palantir Wins Role in $823 Million Government Contract
    Bloomberg

    Peter Thiel’s Palantir Wins Role in $823 Million Government Contract

    (Bloomberg) -- Palantir Technologies Inc. scored another win in Washington Tuesday, securing a contract worth as much as $823 million to provide software to the Department of Defense, according to communications reviewed by Bloomberg.The four-year deal represents more than a decade of work by the Palo Alto, California-based data mining startup to break into the club of existing defense contractors, and bolsters the company’s prospects as it prepares it to go public.The contract is the second half of a larger project. Palantir and Raytheon Co. won the first half of the deal in 2018, worth $876 million. This second part involves Palantir working with BAE Systems to replace the U.S. Army’s Distributed Common Ground System, used for aggregating and analyzing data, which has faced technical challenges. Palantir sued the Army in 2016 to win the right to compete for the new contract after the U.S. Government Accountability Office determined the old system was underperforming and over budget. It is unclear how revenue from the contract will be split between Palantir and BAE Systems. The deal will increase annual sales at Palantir’s government division from its current $500 million or so, according to people familiar with Palantir’s finances who asked not to be identified discussing private information. Investor Peter Thiel co-founded Palantir in 2004, and the company’s software has been used for controversial ends like enabling the immigration deportation policies championed by President Trump, as well as for philanthropic ones like preventing sex trafficking and finding missing children.About half of Palantir’s business relies on deals with large corporate customers like Merck KGaA and Airbus SE,  which use the software to manage drug discovery and improve supply chain logistics.The company is exploring both an IPO and a direct listing, but does not yet have a target date for going public, Bloomberg has reported. To contact the author of this story: Lizette Chapman in San Francisco at lchapman19@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GlobeNewswire

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Investigates Claims On Behalf of Investors of Airbus SE – EADSY; EADSF

    Pomerantz LLP is investigating claims on behalf of investors of Airbus SE (“Airbus” or the “Company”) (OTCMKTS: EADSY; EADSF). Such investors are advised to contact Robert S. Willoughby at rswilloughby@pomlaw.com or 888-476-6529, ext. The investigation concerns whether Airbus and certain of its officers and/or directors have engaged in securities fraud or other unlawful business practices.

  • Trump’s phase one trade deal with China could strengthen free trade globally
    MarketWatch

    Trump’s phase one trade deal with China could strengthen free trade globally

    President Donald Trump’s phase one deal could move the world closer to free trade and ultimately save the World Trade Organization.

  • Financial Times

    The shot for the sky that brought Bombardier low

    “The business of making and selling aeroplanes is not for the fainthearted . . . In deciding to build a new airliner, a manufacturer is literally betting the company.” The opening lines of The Sporty Game ...

  • Airbus investing up to €1 billion in A220 passenger jet programme this year
    Reuters

    Airbus investing up to €1 billion in A220 passenger jet programme this year

    Airbus SE plans to invest between 500 million euros and 1 billion euros (£837 million) this year on its A220 passenger jet programme, Chief Executive Guillaume Faury said on Thursday at the company's A220 factory in Mirabel, just outside Montreal. Earlier in February, Airbus raised its stake in the A220 programme - known as Airbus Canada - to 75% from 50.1% after teaming up with the government of the Canadian province of Quebec to buy Bombardier's 33.5% stake. With the deal, Bombardier exited the civil aviation industry and bolstered the European planemaker's position in its ongoing competition with U.S. rival Boeing Co .

  • Airbus investing up to 1 billion euros in A220 passenger jet program this year
    Reuters

    Airbus investing up to 1 billion euros in A220 passenger jet program this year

    Airbus SE plans to invest between 500 million euros and 1 billion euros ($539 million-$1.08 billion) this year on its A220 passenger jet program, Chief Executive Guillaume Faury said on Thursday at the company's A220 factory in Mirabel, just outside Montreal. Earlier in February, Airbus raised its stake in the A220 program - known as Airbus Canada - to 75% from 50.1% after teaming up with the government of the Canadian province of Quebec to buy Bombardier's 33.5% stake. With the deal, Bombardier exited the civil aviation industry and bolstered the European planemaker's position in its ongoing competition with U.S. rival Boeing Co .

  • China's HNA emerges as recent buyer of A330neo jets amid revamp: sources
    Reuters

    China's HNA emerges as recent buyer of A330neo jets amid revamp: sources

    Debt-laden HNA Group has restructured jet orders with Europe's Airbus in a compromise deal that includes an order for dozens of A330neo jets, two people familiar with the matter said, amid reports of a wider shake-up at the Chinese conglomerate. Airbus last month announced a surprise order for 40 of its A330neo wide-body aircraft, worth $12 billion at list prices, but the buyer's identity was kept under wraps. The sources said the order, dated Dec. 23, came from HNA Group airlines and reflected efforts already in place to carry out a restructuring of fleet plans that would see some previously unfulfilled jet orders fall by the wayside.

  • GE Eyes Jet Engine Sales To Airbus As Boeing 737 Max Crisis Pressures Cash Flow
    Investor's Business Daily

    GE Eyes Jet Engine Sales To Airbus As Boeing 737 Max Crisis Pressures Cash Flow

    General Electric forecast Q1 cash-flow "pressure," citing the still-grounded Boeing 737 Max jet. It's also reportedly seeking more work with Airbus.

  • Airbus defense division plans to cut more than 2,300 jobs
    Reuters

    Airbus defense division plans to cut more than 2,300 jobs

    The aircraft maker said its Airbus Defense and Space division had entered consultation with the company's European works council on the planned cutbacks. The group has also taken a 1.2 billion euro ($1.3 billion) charge on the worsening sales outlook, with a German ban on defense exports to Saudi Arabia causing Airbus Defense and Space to lose a promising potential customer, Dirk Hoke said. Airbus Defense and Space, formed in 2014 as part of a broader restructuring, employs 34,000 staff - 13,000 of them in Germany - and contributes around a fifth of revenues to parent group Airbus.

  • TheStreet.com

    General Electric Turns to Airbus Because of Boeing's Mess

    One airplane maker's misery is another's potential fortune. So it could well be, not just for Airbus SE but also for jet-engine maker General Electric.

  • TriMas Aerospace Wins Airbus Deals, Boosts Fastener Solutions
    Zacks

    TriMas Aerospace Wins Airbus Deals, Boosts Fastener Solutions

    TriMas' (TRS) alliance with Airbus supports its growth strategy to boost global customer base in commercial and defense aerospace applications.

  • TheStreet.com

    General Electric Pivoting to Airbus as Headwinds Hurt Boeing

    General Electric is reportedly in talks with Airbus as the engine maker's other big customer, Boeing, continues to face headwinds over the grounded 737 MAX.

  • Kuwaiti parliament to investigate Airbus aircraft orders
    Reuters

    Kuwaiti parliament to investigate Airbus aircraft orders

    Kuwaiti lawmakers agreed on Wednesday to set up a committee to look into whether Airbus's aircraft orders from the Gulf Arab state involved alleged corruption, the state news agency reported. Governments and airlines around the world have launched their own investigations after Airbus on Jan. 31 reached a record $4 billion settlement with prosecutors in Britain, France and United States over alleged bribery and corruption stretching back more than a decade. In Kuwait, a three-member parliamentary committee has been tasked with reviewing Airbus orders and is to submit a report of its findings to the National Assembly within three months, KUNA reported.

  • Financial Times

    Boeing asks to give up tax break to avert EU tariffs

    Washington state lawmakers on Wednesday introduced bills in the state’s senate and house proposing the end of a business rate tax break for aerospace companies that has saved Boeing more than $1bn since 2004. The move threatens to nullify Brussels’ argument to the World Trade Organization that Boeing continues to benefit from illegal state aid — the basis on which the right to impose tariffs was expected to be granted later this spring.

  • Air Lease's (AL) Earnings Beat Estimates in Q4, Down Y/Y
    Zacks

    Air Lease's (AL) Earnings Beat Estimates in Q4, Down Y/Y

    Higher revenues from rental of flight equipment drive Air Lease's (AL) fourth-quarter 2019 results. However,increase in operating costs is a concern.