FB - Facebook, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
162.50
-1.45 (-0.88%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous Close163.95
Open164.51
Bid162.36 x 800
Ask162.47 x 1000
Day's Range160.86 - 164.70
52 Week Range123.02 - 218.62
Volume15,504,415
Avg. Volume24,969,167
Market Cap463.773B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.23
PE Ratio (TTM)21.47
EPS (TTM)7.57
Earnings DateApr 23, 2019 - Apr 29, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est197.94
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • UK parliament report will call for 'sweeping' regulation of Facebook
    Engadget8 hours ago

    UK parliament report will call for 'sweeping' regulation of Facebook

    The UK Parliament's Facebook document dump is close to creating serious legaltrouble for the social network

  • Please stop marking yourself safe on Facebook
    TechCrunch16 hours ago

    Please stop marking yourself safe on Facebook

    Let me begin by saying that Facebook's Crisis Response pages do a lot of good. As a former Ottawa resident I have multiple Facebook friends there. If a single person were hospitalized as a result of an incident in a single town of 216,000, would Facebook call on every resident of that town to mark themselves safe?

  • Facebook "misled" Parliament on data misuse, U.K. committee says
    CBS MoneyWatch1 hour ago

    Facebook "misled" Parliament on data misuse, U.K. committee says

    CEO Mark Zuckerberg previously said the company learned of the breach from journalists, but a new report questions that

  • Reuters3 hours ago

    Facebook needs independent ethical oversight - UK lawmakers

    Facebook and other big tech companies should be subject to a compulsory code of ethics to tackle the spread of fake news, the abuse of users' data and the bullying of smaller firms, British lawmakers said on Monday. In a damning report that singled out Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg for what it said was a failure of leadership and personal responsibility, the UK parliament's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee said the companies had proved ineffective in stopping harmful content and disinformation on their platforms. "The guiding principle of the 'move fast and break things' culture often seems to be that it is better to apologise than ask permission," committee chairman Damian Collins said.

  • UK lawmakers slam Facebook, recommend stiffer regulation
    Associated Press4 hours ago

    UK lawmakers slam Facebook, recommend stiffer regulation

    British lawmakers issued a scathing report Monday that accused Facebook of intentionally violating privacy and anti-competition laws in the U.K., and called for greater oversight of social media companies. The report on fake news and disinformation on social media sites followed an 18-month investigation. The parliamentary committee that prepared the report says social media sites should have to follow a mandatory code of ethics overseen by an independent regulator to better control harmful or illegal content.

  • The Wall Street Journal4 hours ago

    [$$] U.K. Committee Rebukes Facebook in Call for Social-Media Regulation

    The report urged a compulsory code of ethics for technology companies to deal with harmful or illegal content on their sites. Large sections of the report were devoted to criticism of Facebook, which it said had intentionally and knowingly violated both privacy and anticompetition laws in how it handled user data and tried to stifle competitors. It follows a monthslong inquiry into tech companies and issues of privacy, misinformation and the power of their platforms in the wake of the scandal involving the data-analytics firm Cambridge Analytica’s access to Facebook users’ information.

  • Reuters6 hours ago

    Facebook needs independent ethical oversight: UK lawmakers

    Facebook and other big tech companies should be subject to a compulsory code of ethics to tackle the spread of fake news, the abuse of users' data and the bullying of smaller firms, British lawmakers said on Monday. In a damning report that singled out Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg for what it said was a failure of leadership and personal responsibility, the UK parliament's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee said the companies had proved ineffective in stopping harmful content and disinformation on their platforms. "The guiding principle of the 'move fast and break things' culture often seems to be that it is better to apologize than ask permission," committee chairman Damian Collins said.

  • U.K. Lawmakers Recommend Harsher Penalties For Tech Companies
    Bloomberg6 hours ago

    U.K. Lawmakers Recommend Harsher Penalties For Tech Companies

    Damian Collins, the policy maker who spearheaded the inquiry, called for Parliament to create new laws to help a proposed regulator oversee the industry, with fines for companies to be calculated based on their revenue. “Companies like Facebook exercise massive market power which enables them to make money by bullying the smaller technology companies and developers who rely on this platform to reach their customers,” Collins said in a statement Monday.

  • How Square's Cash App Makes Money (SQ)
    Investopedia8 hours ago

    How Square's Cash App Makes Money (SQ)

    Cash App is free for individuals to download and use, which leaves many people wondering how Square makes money from it.

  • CNBC13 hours ago

    Tech bankers are making their money in the enterprise while Facebook and Google stay quiet

    Facebook and Google have made big splashy deals, but the largest acquisitions of late have been in the enterprise. GitHub, Red Hat, CA and MuleSoft were all acquired last year. While big internet companies like Facebook FB and Google GOOGL have been fairly quiet of late on the deal-making front, business software vendors have kept bankers quite busy.

  • Facebook knew about data misuse earlier, report says
    CBS News Videos1 hour ago

    Facebook knew about data misuse earlier, report says

    A British Parliament report says Facebook knew about a data breach associated with Cambridge Analytica earlier than the social media giant originally admitted. The finding comes from Parliament's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee.